Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Prints

Yvette Lucas Explains Solar Etchings

lucas

(Left image) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar etching, 2010.
(Right Image) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar etching, 2010.

The Old Print Gallery has a show of etchings now up on view. Because the prints span from 1909 to 2012, ETCHED highlights both the use of  traditional methods and a newer trend among contemporary printmakers- a playful exploration of the medium with novel materials, resins, and acids. Yvette Lucas is a perfect example of a printmaker incorporating technological advancements into her creative process. She works with Solarplates™ to create beautiful photo intaglios- two of which are featured in the show.

Solarplates™ were created in the early 1970s by Dan Weldon. Not only are these plates more economical and faster to work with than traditional copper or zinc plates, they remove acid baths from the etching process-resulting in an environmentally friendly printmaking process and safer working conditions for the printmaker.  The plate is “etched” by the sun, which appeals to not just printmakers but also photographers and multi-media artists.

Below, Lucas has written about her experience with Solarplates™ to create Lace and Ecstatic Tree just for our OPG blog readers. We hope you enjoy this look into her creative process and methods.

PHOTO INTAGLIOS

So many of us are drawn to the natural places that exist outside of the heavily populated towns and cities. They engage our senses and calm our mind. I chose these images for their quiet but powerful presence to be enhanced by the process of ink pressed into paper. There is a depth and dimension that is achieved with the intaglio process which is different from a pigment print. Though not as sharply detailed, its softness and warmth pulls in the viewer to experience and linger in those places.  

These intaglios are printed from Solarplates™, steel plates coated with a light sensitive polymer. The plate is exposed with a film positive using sunlight or other form of UV light to burn the image onto the plate. The plates are processed in water then inked, hand wiped, and printed on an etching press in small editions. In this series I use raw sepia for its large tonal range and warm brown color.

Thanks to Yvette Lucas for the explanation! OPG blog readers can view the ETCHED prints in person at our Georgetown gallery or online here.  The show is on view until April 5, 2014.

 

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Updates, Prints

ETCHED Opening Reception

You’re Invited….

ETCHED Ad Flat RGB

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

ETCHED

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.  (Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.
(Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

We are very excited to announce ETCHED, our upcoming OPG show of early 20th century and contemporary original etchings, which will open Friday, February 21, 2014. The gallery will host a nighttime reception that Friday, from 5-8pm, which is open and free to the public. The show will remain on view at the gallery until April 5, 2014, during normal gallery hours.

Etching as a form of printmaking evolved from metal workshops of the Middle Ages, where swords, armor, and tools were all etched with acid to produce intricate line and scroll work. Daniel Hopfer, a 16th century craftsman, applied these metalworking techniques to iron printmaking plates, and was the first to use etching as a form of printmaking. Many artists were soon lured by etching’s capacity to capture the essence and spontaneity of the artist’s hand in printed form.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

ETCHED will celebrate the long legacy of printmakers who specialize in and focus on etching as a way of image making. As the show pulls from over a century of creative expression, viewers will be fascinated by the myriad of ways an artist can use an etched line to create tone, atmosphere, and detail. The show also highlights new technical advances in etching, including multi-plate color etchings and experimental solar plate etchings.

Highlights include meticulously etched architectural views by John Taylor Arms, two direct and intimate portraits by Isabel Bishop and Nicholas Vagenas, and  velvety and dense lines found in works by Peter Milton and Otto Kuhler.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Selected Artists: Sigmund Abeles, John Taylor Arms, Frank W. Benson, Robert Birmelin, Isabel Bishop, Richard Carleton, Arthur Cohen, Robert Cook, Joseph Essig, Takuji Kubo, Otto Kuhler, Yvette Lucas, Charles F. Mielatz, Peter Milton, Ellen Nathan Singer, Joseph Pennell, Susan Pyzow, Nicholas Vagenas, Hank Virgona, Bruce Waldman.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints

BLOSSOM DC to Open in March

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its newest gallery exhibit, BLOSSOM DC. BLOSSOM DC opens on March 16, 2012 with a nighttime opening reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. Inspired by the 100 year anniversary of the gift of cherry trees from Japan to Washington, DC, this show celebrates the beauty and youthful energy of spring’s blossoms. Most exciting for the gallery is the large number of prints by local DC artists included in the show, which are coupled with a selection of works by NY contemporary artists and several early 20th century printmakers.

Highlights from BLOSSOM DC include new prints by DC artist Marti Patchell- intensely saturated works, composed of pulsing reds and hot pinks. Her large show stopping pieces rely on a combination of etching, reliefs, and stencils, creating prints that are cacophonous in color, untamed and stimulating homages to spring’s budding energy.  In contrast, Susan Goldman’s large scale woodcut plays with layers. Abstract blue and black brushstrokes create a deep and dark abyss, from which a large deep-red blossom emerges. Alternatively, local artist Philip Bennet’s prints are less representational, rooted in abstract forms and color interaction. His loose spills of paint and prismatic color schemes make for refreshing and organic monoprints.

Rare for the Old Print Gallery, this show will also feature a painting. Although we  deal exclusively in prints, one of our NY printmakers, Su-Li Hung, experiments in both mediums. Her painting on oil canvas, Taiwan Cherry Tree, will be accompany one of her woodcuts, St.Mark’s Church & Cherry Tree, on our gallery wall. An exciting coupling, her painting and print play off one another nicely- the bold, thick woodcut lines offer a noticeable contrast to her layered, painterly brushstrokes of oil paint.

BLOSSOM DC will open with a nighttime reception on Friday, March 16, from 5-8pm at the Old Print Gallery, located in the heart of Georgetown. Many of the artists will be in attendance, to share their inspiration and answer questions regarding their work and process. Free wine and light refreshments will be served, and the event is open to all ages.

Selected Artists: Philip Bennet, Childe Hassam, Susan Goldman, Su-Li Hung, Gene Kloss, Yvette Lucas, Marian Osher, Marti Patchell, Laurent Schkolnyk, Gerald Scheck, Erwin Thamm, and Emily Trueblood.

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