17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, 20th Century Maps, American Maps, Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Foreign Maps, Foreign Views, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Maps, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Pocket Maps, Prints, Sporting, World Maps

May 2015 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new May 2015 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog presents a wide range of prints and maps, at all price points. Highlights include Fritz Baedeker travel maps of popular cities and destinations, baseball scenes, college views, circus prints, Frederick Catherwood lithographs of ancient Mayan temples, and more! We have also feature several selections from our most recent aquatint show, Tonal Array, and our current landscape exhibit, Resonant Terrain.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in September. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the May Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.  Volume XXXVIII, Number 2.  May 2015. Click Here To Read!

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.
Volume XXXVIII, Number 2. May 2015.
Click Here To Read!

We hope you enjoy it!

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16th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, Engraving, Maps, Portraits, Prints, World Maps

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator. A cartographer, mathematician, philosopher, inventor, engraver, and teacher, Mercator was a man whose eponymous cartographic projection forever changed how mariners navigate their ships and how we see the world. He was also the first person to call a collection of maps an atlas. Cheers to a great man and an even greater mind.

VIA LINK.

Image via LINK.

Below are world maps based on Mercator’s Projection. All the meridians intersect with lines of latitude at 90 degree angles. Alone, this would still skew a line of bearing. To combat this, Mercator proportionally increased the distance between the parallels, so he could match the rate of angular distortion. This projection was widely used for navigation charts during the age of exploration, as any straight line on a Mercator-projection map is a line of constant true bearing that enables a navigator to plot a straight-line course, without having to continuously recalculate his course.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator's Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale.  Handcolored engraving,1844.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator’s Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale. Handcolored engraving,1844.

Colton's Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator's Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources.  By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Colton’s Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources. By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue.  Engraving, 1821.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue. Engraving, 1821.

Map of the World on Mercators Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Gilbert's Map of the World, on Mercator's Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

Gilbert’s Map of the World, on Mercator’s Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

 

 

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18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Abstract, American Maps, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Foreign Maps, Gallery Updates, Genre, Landscapes, Maps, Natural History, Naval, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Portraits, Prints, World Maps

Holiday 2014 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new Holiday 2014 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s special holiday edition features a wide range of prints and maps from our collection.

Whether you are looking for a gift for a friend, loved one, or yourself, we offer marvelous examples of important historical scenes, holiday genre, early 20th century American masters, and contemporary fine art. The maps selected for this issue offer a visual “tour around the world”, beginning with three pages of double hemisphere world maps,  an extensive history and list of available state maps by 19th century map publisher Ormando W. Gray, as well as the original 1792 L’Enfant/Ellicott Plan of the City of Washington by Philadelphia-based engravers Thakara and Vallance. Those interested in historical prints will enjoy our prints of George Washington, War of 1812 battle scenes, and George Caleb Bingham’s Stump Speaking– one of the most important depictions of 19th century American politics. Get into the holiday spirit by perusing the wintry genre scenes by Currier and Ives, Thomas Nast, A. B. Frost, and more.

Prints by American masters George Bellows, Robert Riggs, Armin Landeck, Martin Lewis, and Reginald Marsh all appear on later pages of the catalog, followed by a selection of our original, hand-pulled works by DC, NY, regional, and international printmakers. These prints are an impressive and alluring display of the current eclecticism found in contemporary printmaking.

Published in both traditional and digital media formats, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in February. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the 2014 Holiday Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. Holiday Issue. Volume XXXVII, Number 4. Click to read here.

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. Holiday Issue. Volume XXXVII, Number 4.
Click to read here.

We hope you enjoy it!

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, World Maps

Strait of Anian

79997-2 strait

(Detail of) Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. By Claes Jansz Visscher. Copper-plate engraving, 1639-1652. LINK.

Today we are sharing several of our antique maps that feature the mythical Strait of Anian, which first appeared on maps in the mid-16th century. This strange waterway shows up on maps until the late 17th century, finally disappearing once the northwest coast of North America was fully explored and documented. What is so fascinating about these make-believe places and watery bodies is their evolution; depending on the year and map maker, they tend to migrate to new locations and change in size and importance.

47385 nw pass

(Detail of) Carte des parties nord et ouest de l’Amerique. By Didier Robert de Vaugondy. Published by Diderot et d’Alembert, Paris. Copper engraving, 1772. LINK.

In the mid-16th century, the Strait of Anian was located near what is now the Bering Strait. The Strait was a short channel of water between northeastern Asia and northwestern America. Towards the end of the 17th century, the Strait of Anian migrates south, closer to California. In these maps, the Strait joins up with other waterways that stretch across North America, creating the mythical Northwest Passage. Many hoped (and believed) in a marine route that would connect the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, but spare travelers the dangerous and long voyage around the southern tip of South America. Surely a tempting prospect, the idea of a Northwest Passage across North America was bolstered by falsified travel stories and imperial ambition. The Strait of Anian became the western access point to a navigable route that eventually ended in the French-owned Hudson Bay.

The fabled and fictitious Strait was finally removed from maps in the early 18th century, thanks to westward expansion and exploration.

America sive India Nova. By Michael Mercator. Published by Rumold Mercator, Duisburg. Copper plate engraving, 1595 (c.1616-1619). LINK.

America sive India Nova. By Michael Mercator. Published by Rumold Mercator, Duisburg. Copper plate engraving, 1595 (c.1616-1619). LINK.

Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. By Pieter van den Keere. Issued by Joannes Jansonius, Amsterdam. Copper-plate engraving, handcolored, 1608 - c.1630. LINK.

Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. By Pieter van den Keere. Issued by Joannes Jansonius, Amsterdam. Copper-plate engraving, handcolored, 1608 – c.1630. LINK.

Werelt Caert. By Pieter and Jacob Keur. Published by Daniel Stoopendaal. Copper plate engraving, c.1680. LINK.

Werelt Caert. By Pieter and Jacob Keur. Published by Daniel Stoopendaal. Copper plate engraving, c.1680. LINK.

Carte Generale des Decouvertes de l'Amiral de Fonte representant la grande probabilite d'un Passage au Nord Ouest par Thomas Jefferys. By Didier Robert de Vaugondy. Published Paris. Copper engraving, 1772. LINK.

Carte Generale des Decouvertes de l’Amiral de Fonte representant la grande probabilite d’un Passage au Nord Ouest par Thomas Jefferys. By Didier Robert de Vaugondy. Published Paris. Copper engraving, 1772. LINK.

 

 

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19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Views, Americana, Chromolithograph, Lithograph, Maps, Multi-color Rotolithograph, Prints, World Maps

Washington DC Puzzle

The Capitol at Washington. Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection. (Puzzle, map, and view.)  View: chromolithograph. Map: multi-color rotolithograph. Published by McLoughlin Bros., New York, 1888.

 

We recently added a unique boxed puzzle, with a view of the United States Capitol building on one side and a map of the world on the other, to our inventory. The title on the puzzle box is: “A New Dissected Map of the World with a picture puzzle of the Capitol at Washington.”  It comes with a separate folded copy of the world map. The puzzle creates a striking view of the Capitol, with a blue and coral sky and lots of activity around the entrance to the Capitol. As is typical in 19th century puzzles, the outer ring of pieces all link into each other, while the inner pieces are flat-sided squares and rectangles.  The puzzle was created in 1888.

The puzzle was published by McLoughlin Bros., Inc., a New-York based publishing firm, active from 1828-1920.  The company was a pioneer in color printing technologies in children’s books and games. Early products were  attractively hand-painted, in what was an early form of an assembly line–the line drawings were passed from artist to artist with each one responsible for coloring in one of the colors. The company later experimented with chromolithographic and multi-color rotolithographic printing techniques. McLoughlin Bros. also specialized in the retelling of classic stories, with omissions of lewder or uncouth sections, to make the story more child-friendly.   By 1886, the firm was publishing a wide range of items, including chapbooks, larger picture-books, puzzles, games, and paper dolls. McLoughlin produced some of the most colorful and collectible board games in America, and was a prolific manufacturer of games until the company was bought out by Milton Bradley in 1920.

To see this item on our website, click here. You can also see it in person at our Georgetown DC gallery.

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