Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Woodcut

Past/Present: Circus

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two prints from our upcoming summer show, PER∙FORM. The older print is by Arnold Ronnebeck (1885-1947), a noted modernist sculptor and lithographer. Ronnenbeck studied sculpture with Aristide Maillol and Émile-Antoine Bourdelle in Paris between 1907 and 1913. In 1923, he made the move to the United States, and was best known for his lithographs of New York City in the 1920s and depictions of western life in Colorado and New Mexico in the 1920s through the 1940s. He later settled in Denver, Colorado, and worked as Art Adviser to the Denver Art Museum from 1926-1931. His print shown below, We Shall Always Love Them, was first exhibited in November of 1937, at the Chicago Art Institute’s “Sixth International Exhibition of Lithography and Wood Engraving”.

The contemporary print is a woodcut by Ellen Nathan Singer. Singer grew up in Brooklyn, New York and studied theater at Columbia University and at some of the New York acting schools. In her early twenties, she took classes at the Art Students League of New York where she won scholarships and ultimately taught. Recently, she was voted into the Society of American Graphic Artists, and is now on their council. Singer works primarily in pastels, etchings, and woodcuts. Trips around the country and abroad, almost yearly to England, serve as subject matter for her art. She also continues to work on New York City images, and to draw inspiration from the moment.

Image on Left: We Shall Always Love Them. By Arnold Ronnebeck. Lithograph, 1936. Edition 20.

Image on Right: On the High Wire.  [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010. Edition 10.

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69438-2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***PER∙FORM opens THIS Friday, July 13, 2013, with an opening night reception. Join us at the gallery from 5:00 to 8:00pm to help us celebrate our new summer show!

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Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Linocut, New Additions, Prints, Woodcut

New Additions: Ocean Night

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added a new print by Emily Trueblood to our inventory and website. It is a striking and beautiful print of the ocean at night, completed in color woodcut. Trueblood, while better known for her prints of New York City  architecture, is an avid swimmer and draws inspiration from her time in the water. She has produced several prints of waves, surfers, and swimmers over the years, and this new addition is a perfect complement to her previous water images. We hope you enjoy it! As always, you can view and purchase the print online or in our Georgetown shop.

Ocean Night 1. Emily Trueblood. Woodcut, 2012. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16" (202 x 256 mm). Edition 30. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $175.00.

Ocean Night 1. By Emily Trueblood. Woodcut, 2012. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16″ (202 x 256 mm). Edition 30. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $175.00.

Below are some of Trueblood’s other water-related prints:

Ocean Wave. by Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 2000. Image size 6 x 8" (150 x 200 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $150.00.

Ocean Wave. by Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 2000. Image size 6 x 8″ (150 x 200 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $150.00.

Ocean Bay at Night. By Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 1999. Image size 8 7/8 x 11 15/16" (226 x 303 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $200.00

Ocean Bay at Night. By Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 1999. Image size 8 7/8 x 11 15/16″ (226 x 303 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $200.00

Fast Start. By Emily Trueblood. Linocut, 2001. Image size 1 1/2 x 2 15/16" (38 x 68 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $125.00.

Fast Start. By Emily Trueblood. Linocut, 2001. Image size 1 1/2 x 2 15/16″ (38 x 68 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $125.00.

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Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Prints, Woodcut

Mary Manusos

“For many years my art has held together as a statement of color and response to places and situations I have experienced. Then in 1976, I become fascinated with the bright colors and light of Mexico.”

Oaxaca Column. [Two pieces stacked.]  Mary Manusos. Woodcut on handmade paper, 2010. Monoprint.

Oaxaca Column. [Two pieces stacked.] Mary Manusos. Woodcut on handmade paper, 2010. Monoprint.

We are happy to introduce the work of Mary Manusos to our blog readers. We featured California RB Two. [Hotel California.] and San Francisco LB Two. [Convento San Franciso.] in our RED show, and received many compliments from show attendees on her pieces and work. (San Francisco sold, but California RB Two is still available!) As a result, we recently acquired one of her Oaxaca series prints- a stunning woodcut diptych on handmade paper.

Mary Manusos was born in San Diego, California.  She studied at San Diego State University, then at University of Wisconsin at Madison. Manusos has been creating art for almost four decades and has had numerous single artist shows, juried shows, and has received nine grants. She has written numerous books, including D’ART OBJECTS and Woman’s Self Image. Her work is in numerous public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, Tweed Museum, Cleveland Museum, and the Library of Congress.

Her fascination with the rich colors and textures of Mexican architecture and landscape resulted in the creation of 600 SX-70 photographs, which were manipulated “to accentuate the essence of each particular situation recorded.” The images were edited and published as D’ART OBJECTS, a collaboration between Mary Manusos and John Chakeres, in 1979. These photographs, along with her travels, played an important role in the structure and content of her subsequent art work.

Excerpt from Manusos’ Artist Statement:

“…Prints of landscape and architecture are close up views of a state of documenting then removing from the place they are found.  The resulting portraits of place and form are dismembered and put back together to make new propositions.  These images are usually found in simple situations on the course of a walk.  There is not much that distinguishes one building from another, a ditch, a road, a hedge, a blanket, or a flower.  The distinction comes when I decide to use an image and create its urgency.  The works are in response to what I feel about the Latin American landscape.  A landscape that is given meaning by the lives that it supports.  The variety of ephemera of human intervention and invention on the landscape is of great interest to me.  The history left behind evokes a story as I record it.  I can bring many emotions to the work through the use of my colors and the strength of my lines.  One can feel the weight of the place I am defining and the sunshine that exudes from it’s life force…”

(Mary Manusos, 7/30/09, http://www.marymanusos.com/mmfineartist/Statement.html

California RB Two.  [Hotel California.] Mary Manusos. Woodcut on handmade paper, 2009. Monoprint.

California RB Two. [Hotel California.] Mary Manusos. Woodcut on handmade paper, 2009. Monoprint.

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19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Chromolithograph, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Lithograph, Natural History, Prints, Woodcut

Owl Prints

Throughout history, people have regarded owls with fascination and wonder. Few other creatures have so many varied and contradictory beliefs about them, owls have been both feared and venerated.

In early Indian folklore, owls represented wisdom and helpfulness. As a consequence of their night vision, they were believed to have powers of prophecy- capable of seeing concealed facets of a person or situation and were heralded as powerful predictors of events to come. This symbolism recurs in Aesop’s fables-“The Owl and the Other Birds”- and in Greek myths. In Greek mythology, the Owl was a creature sacred to Athena, goddess of the night who represented wisdom. Athena had a companion owl on her shoulder, which revealed unseen truths to her.

By the Middle Ages in Europe, the owl had become the cohort of witches and the inhabitant of dark, lonesome, and profane places. Its reputation was reduced to a feared specter. An owl’s emergence at night, when others were left vulnerable and blind, linked them with creatures and spirits both mysterious and unknown. Its eerie call signaled a death was imminent or some evil was at hand, its hoot filled people with foreboding and apprehension.

During the eighteenth century, the zoological attributes of owls were detailed through close observation, reducing the mystery that surrounded these animals.

Below are some of our owl prints, available at our gallery in  Georgetown or in shop in New York.

Asio otus (L.).  Waldohreule.  1 Mannchen.  Asio accipitrinus (Pall.).  Sumpfohreule. 2 Mannchen.  [Long-eared Owl / Short-eared Owl].  Published by Gera-Umterhaus. Chromolithograph. 1896-1905. $90.00

Asio otus (L.). Waldohreule. 1 Mannchen. Asio accipitrinus (Pall.). Sumpfohreule. 2 Mannchen. [Long-eared Owl / Short-eared Owl]. Published by Gera-Umterhaus. Chromolithograph. 1896-1905. $90.00

Snowy Owl No. 3. By H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1934.

Snowy Owl No. 3. By H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1934. $250.00

Pl. V (owl and other birds). By Theodore Jasper. Published by Jacob H. Studer Co., Colombus, OH. Chromolithograph, 1878. From "Popular Ornithology, The Birds of North America" by Jacob H. Studer. $75.00

Pl. V (owl and other birds). By Theodore Jasper. Published by Jacob H. Studer Co., Colombus, OH. Chromolithograph, 1878. From “Popular Ornithology, The Birds of North America” by Jacob H. Studer. $75.00

Subcommittee. Joan Drew. Woodcut, 1968. Edition 32. $350.00

Subcommittee. Joan Drew. Woodcut, 1968. Edition 32. $350.00

Burrowing Owl, Columbian Owl, European Little, Pygmy Owl, Short-eared Owl  PL. 432. John James Audubon. Aquatint and engraving, 1838.

Burrowing Owl, Columbian Owl, European Little, Pygmy Owl, Short-eared Owl PL. 432. John James Audubon. Aquatint and engraving, 1838.

Frank and Bernie.  [Rockport, Massachusetts.] By Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph,1977. $1,200.00

Frank and Bernie. [Rockport, Massachusetts.] By Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph,1977. Edition 100. $1,200.00

Owl No. 1. By Ben Shahn. Lithograph, 1968. $1,200.00

Owl No. 1. By Ben Shahn. Lithograph, 1968. $1,200.00

 

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Collagraph, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

ROSS/ROMANO Opens in April

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The Old Print Gallery is very excited to announce our new summer show, Ross/Romano.  The show will open on April 19 and stay on view until July 13, 2013. The exhibit features the work of John Ross and Clare Romano, internationally known printmakers, teachers, and husband and wife creative duo. Their prints sample architecture, waterways, and canyon vistas- a visual record of their travels to Italy and the Southwest. Working in the medium of collagraphy and woodcuts, prints by Ross and Romano marry texture and color in a beautiful and skillfully layered way. A free nighttime reception will be held on Friday, April 19, 2013 from 5-8pm at the Old Print Gallery, to celebrate the show’s opening.

Ross and Romano’s book ”The Complete Printmaker”, first published in 1972, has been called the definitive textbook on printmaking, and is still in use today at universities and art schools. The prints selected for this show will heavily showcase the duo’s talent and expertise at collagraphy- a true printing hybrid that involves collage applied to a plate, printed by intaglio or relief methods.

Spanish Hills.  [Nevada.] By Clare Romano. Collagraph, undated.

Spanish Hills. [Nevada.] By Clare Romano. Collagraph, undated.

Romano’s canyon scenes weave together textural ribbons of dusty rose and bright orange. Her abstract bands evoke sky, land, and water, harmoniously flowing into one another. In contrast, Ross builds his compositions with interlocking, architectural shapes, resulting in layered city views. Blending the Gothic archways and vaults of Venice with the stark skyscrapers of New York, Ross creates fantastical urban landscapes that seem right out of Metropolis.

Voyage. By John Ross. Collagraph, undated. Ed. 75.

Voyage. By John Ross. Collagraph, undated. Ed. 75.

Metropolis. John Ross. Collagraph, undated.

Metropolis. John Ross. Collagraph, undated.

John Ross is a painter, printmaker, book artist and Professor of Art. He has served as president of the Society of American Graphic Artists, and is active in a number of art organizations. He printed and illustrated many books with original prints. He has had over sixty one-artist shows and is represented in many museum collections. Ross studied at Cooper Union School of Art, Parson School of Design, École des Beaux-Arts, New School for Social Research, Columbia University, and Istituto Statale d’Arte in Italy. He taught printmaking at the New School for over fifty years and has been a professor of art Manhattanville College.

Grand Canyon. Clare Romano. Collagraph, 1975.

Grand Canyon. Clare Romano. Collagraph, 1975.

Clare Romano was born in Palisades, New Jersey, in 1922. She studied at Cooper Union training as a painter. Her first prints were lithographs produced at Robert Blackburn’s workshop in 1949; but she has worked in many different mediums. She is best known for her stunning woodcuts and for her collagraphs. She is a noted educator, teaching generations of artists printmaking at the New School, Pratt Graphics Center and Pratt Institute. Throughout her career she has received numerous awards and has had many one artist shows. Her work is in museums across the United States and Europe.

Magic Mountain. By Clare Romano.  Collagraph, undated.

Magic Mountain. By Clare Romano. Collagraph, undated.

The Old City. By John Ross. Woodcut, undated.

The Old City. By John Ross. Woodcut, undated.

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