Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Prints, Serigraph

Will Barnet on Theory

Ariadne. By Will Barnet. Published by Styria Studio, Inc., New York and Will Barnet. Color serigraph. 1980. Image size 17 3/4 x 15" (450 x 378 mm). Edition 150. Inscribed "54/150." LINK.

Ariadne. By Will Barnet. Published by Styria Studio, Inc., New York and Will Barnet. Color serigraph. 1980. Image size 17 3/4 x 15″ (450 x 378 mm). Edition 150. Inscribed “54/150.” LINK.

“The crux of my art is that I believe in theory and aesthetics as the base for any artist’s development. To me no artist can develop without theory… Theory and ideas are absolutely essential, and you need culture. It is nice to be emotional and I think I am emotional enough as it is, but you need control and a depth of experience in what painting is all about… I think only by studying the past will you know what today should be like. That’s my belief anyway.”- Will Barnet

Quote from: Oral history interview with Will Barnet, 1968 January 15, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. LINK.

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Aquatint, Charcoal Drawing, Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Drawing, Etching, Figurative, Lithograph, Pencil Drawing, Prints, Watercolor

“20th Century People” to Open in September

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown.  Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8" (257 x 302 mm). LINK.

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown. Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8″. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery’s new fall show, 20th Century People, will open on Friday, September 18th, with an opening reception from 5-7pm. The exhibit is a compendium of “people in prints” by some of the most celebrated 20th century American printmakers. Working and creating in a time when the art world was pushing towards abstract expressionism and modernism, these print artists stayed rooted in a sort of inherent figural humanism. With an exquisite ability to convey emotion through the anatomy of the human figure, the artists used their pencils, woodblocks, and burins to capture an arresting gaze, a fleeting moment between individuals, people at work, at play, and deep in thought. Seen together, these prints offer a glimpse of 20th century America, while also reminding viewers of our shared human condition. The show will remain on view until November 14, 2015.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Selected Artists: Peggy Bacon, Albert W. Barker, Will Barnet, Leonard Baskin, Thomas Hart Benton, Isabel Bishop, Abe Blasko, Ernest Fiene, Emil Ganso, Gordon Grant, Marion Greenwood, Irwin D. Hoffman, Martin Lewis, Charles W. Locke, James Penney, Robert Riggs, John Sloan, Bruce Waldman, Max Weber, and Anders Zorn.

Click HERE to see the prints included in the show. 

Single Strap Hanger. ISabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4". LINK.

Single Strap Hanger. Isabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4″. LINK.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints, Watercolor

RED show

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

We are very excited to announce our early spring show, RED, which will open with a nighttime reception on February 15, 2013.  RED is a group show of contemporary and early 20th century printmakers who feature the emboldened and passionate hue of red in their prints. Red is the color of blood, fire, earthen clay and blushing petals, and as such, has strong symbolic connections to life and vitality. The selected artists use this energizing pigment to excite the eye and engage viewers- drawing them into their dynamic compositions.

Highlights include a monotype, Fast Forward, by Washington, DC artist Rosemary Cooley, whose concentrated red tones pulsate beneath more delicate looping white and blue strokes. Similarly, red weaves its way along limbs, eyes, and biomorphic shapes in Cantos y Voces and outlines two faces in Black & White, both by Karima Muyaes. Here, red symbolizes blood-ties and familial relationships, linking disparate visages together into a cohesive whole.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Red also is used by artists in representations of our natural world. It shows up in the rust-colored canyons of John Ross’s collagraphs, in the flushed petals of Clare Romano’s Mallorcan Flower and Nina Muys’ Hibiscus, and in the ominous and bruised red and purple sky of Frederick Mershimer’s Eye of the Storm.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

The show will be on view until April 13, 2013. We encourage all our blog readers and gallery followers to attend the RED opening reception and show, to see these beautiful and striking prints in person.

Selected Artists: Will Barnet, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Robert Birmelin, Rosemary Cooley, Antonio Frasconi, Susan Goldman, Mary Manusos, Tokoha Matsuda, Heather McMordie, Judy Mensch, Frederick Mershimer, Karima Muyaes, Nina Muys, Michael Pellettieri, Matt Phillips, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Clare Romano, John Ross, and Hank Virgona.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

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17th Century Prints, Collagraph, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Gallery Event, Lithograph, Prints, Serigraph, Silver Gelatin Print, White-line Woodcut, Woodcut

Online Summer Shows at the Old Print Shop- Pt. 3

Our NYC sister shop, the Old Print Shop, has three fantastic summer shows going on right now. You can view all three summer shows  online, through their exhibition tab on their website.  Below is a preview of one of their shows, Summer in the Country.

Country Scene. By Peter Hurd. Color lithograph, undated.

Summer in the Country

The country: a place of great escape, where one can leave behind the hustle and bustle of their ordinary lives and enwrap themselves in the beauty that is nature. It is a place of endless entertainment, where natural wonders await discovery and hobbies, new and old, can be enjoyed by people of all ages. From mountain tops to canyon bottom, from horseback riding to sailing and fishing, there are any number of possibilities. One simply needs to find them.

Augustus. By Antonio Tempeste. Engraving, c.1600.

Fence and Shadow. (Newport, RI). By Bo Kass. Silver gelatin print, 2002.

Beach Study. By Richard Carleton. Etching, 2007-8.

Landscape, Cape Cod. By Agnes Weinrich. White-line woodcut, c.1920.

Summer. By Will Barnet. Color lithograph and serigraph. 1986.

The Beach at Dorset. By Ellen Nathan Singer. Etching, 2001.

Red Canyon. By Clare Romano. Collagraph, 1983.

To view Summer in the Country online,  click here. We blogged about The Art of Sporting exhibit last Friday, which can be viewed here, and the exhibit City Heat on Saturday, which can be viewed here.

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