Our Mixed Winter Show is now on view at The Old Print Gallery. Stop by our Georgetown shop to see these stunning original 20th century and contemporary prints.Mixed Winter Show

Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Openings, Prints

On View Now…

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Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Prints

Mixed Winter Show

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16" (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16″ (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

From November 20th through February 12th, the Old Print Gallery will display a new selection of prints from emerging and established printmakers, pulling from both our 20th century and contemporary print collection. This showcase of prints will exhibit a variety of printmaking techniques, and range from representational to abstract in theme. Just in time for the 2015 Holiday Season, this eclectic and impressive mix will have original artwork available at all price points, with prints desirable to the seasoned art collector as well as those looking to break into the market.

Selected Artists: Alexander Archipenko, Albert W. Barker, Philip Bennet, Matt Brown, Asa Cheffetz, Robert Cook, Michael Di Cerbo, Werner Drewes, Richard Florsheim, Eric Goldberg, Rockwell Kent, Richard Lubell, Heather McMordie, Frederick Mershimer, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Matt Phillips, Emilio Sanchez, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Benton Murdoch Spruance, and Lawrence N. Wilbur.

To see the prints included in the show, click here.

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4" (428 x 337 mm).

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4″ (428 x 337 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8" (428 x 327 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8″ (428 x 327 mm).

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4".

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4″.

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Contemporary, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Monotype, Prints, Woodcut

Upcoming Print Events

At The Old Print Gallery:

Woman Under a Tree. BY Eliza Draper Gardiner. Woodblock, c. 1932. Image size 6 x 7 inches. LINK.

Woman Under a Tree. BY Eliza Draper Gardiner. Woodblock, c. 1932. Image size 6 x 7 inches. LINK.

Ink & Grain’s Last Week: Make sure to stop by the Gallery to see Ink & Grain before the show ends. Ink & Grain highlights 20th century printmakers who excelled in woodcuts and wood engravings. One of the most ancient forms of printmaking, the woodcut saw an energized revival during the 20th century. American printmakers experimented heavily with technique, by manipulating the grain of the wooden matrix and crafting new methods of ink and color application. Ink & Grain celebrates this renaissance and the skilled printmakers who worked in the medium, creating in the form of editioned prints, hand-made books, and commercial book illustrations. The show’s last day is this Saturday, November 15th.

Persistent Optimism 4a. Heather McMordie. Stone lithograph with woodcut and mixed media, 2014. Ed 1/3. Paper size 11 x 10". LINK.

Persistent Optimism 4a. Heather McMordie. Stone lithograph with woodcut and mixed media, 2014. Ed 1/3. Paper size 11 x 10″. LINK.

2014 Winter Contemporary Show Opening Reception: Join us on Friday, November 21, from 5-8pm at the Gallery, as we celebrate the opening of our new 2014 Winter Contemporary Show. Works by thirteen different printmakers, all created within the last two years, were chosen for the show. The prints offer a dizzying array of techniques and styles from local DC, regional, and international printmakers. Purposeful and inventive, the prints are successful experiments in medium, color, and scale. The show will remain on view until February 14, 2014.


 OPG Printmakers Around Town:

Target Bloom II. Susan Goldman. Monotype with woodcut, 2014.

Target Bloom II. Susan Goldman. Monotype with woodcut, 2014.

A Path Through Darkness- Whole, Sound, Color Light Opening Reception: This Thursday, November 13, from 4:30 to 6:30pm, celebrate with Susan Goldman at an opening reception for her new prints, in a show titled A Path Through Darkness: Whole, Sound, Color, Light. The reception will be held at the Lombardi Atrium of the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center of Georgetown University Hospital. The show is presented by the Arts and Humanities Program.

Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, 3800 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20007. Parking in Leavy Conference Center Garage.

More info: Contact Julia Langley at julia.langley@georgetown.edu.

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Power. Werner Drewes. Woodcut on paper, 1982.

Werner Drewes: Artist and Humanitarian Opening Reception: A show of works by celebrated printmaker Werner Drewes will be on view at the United States District Court in Greenbelt, Maryland. The Opening Reception is on Thursday, November 20, 2014, from 5:00pm- 6:30pm. Opening remarks will be made by Karen E. D. Seibert, granddaughter of the artist, and a Doctors Without Borders representative. 10% of all proceeds from the sales at the Opening Reception with be donated to Doctors Without Borders. The show will remain on view until January 30, 2015, with show hours of Monday- Friday, 9am to 4pm. The show is presented by the U. S. District Court and The Hyattstown Mill Arts Project.

United States District Court, 6500 Cherrywood Lane, Greenbelt, Maryland 20770.

More info: http://drewesfineart.com/

Swirls. By Philip Bennet. Monotype with pastel, 2014.

Swirls. By Philip Bennet. Monotype with pastel, 2014.

Pastel Unleashed: A Mixed-Media Approach Artists’ Reception and Awards Ceremony: OPG printmaker Philip Bennet has a print in this juried show, presented by the Maryland Pastel Society. The show was an invitation to artists by the Society to rethink soft pastel. Work entered in the show was required to have, in addition to soft pastel, one or more other painting or drawing mediums. Philip Bennet’s monotype with pastel Swirls was selected for the exhibit. The Artists’ Reception and Awards Ceremony is on November 23, 2014 from 2:00pm- 4:00pm. The Exhibition opens on November 22, 2014 and closes on January 4, 2015.

Invitational Gallery, Strathmore Mansion, 10701 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD, 20852.

More info: https://marylandpastelsociety.com/

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Early 20th Century, Landscapes, Prints, Woodcut

Werner Drewes

Farm with Figures. By Werner Drewes. Woodcut on Japanese paper, 1931.  Image size 8 3/8 x 11 3/4". LINK.

Farm with Figures. By Werner Drewes. Woodcut on Japanese paper, 1931. Image size 8 3/8 x 11 3/4″. LINK.

Werner Drewes (1899-1985) was born in Canig, Germany. In 1921, he was admitted into the Bauhaus where he studied under artists such as Klee and Muche. Drewes traveled throughout Italy and Spain studying the old masters, particularly Velasquez and El Greco, supporting himself by selling prints as postcards. His vagabond lifestyle took him to the Americas and Asia, where he was inspired the people and landscapes he met along the way. In 1930 he immigrated to the U.S. with his wife, Margaret Schrobsdorf, and his sons. From 1934 to 1936, Drewes taught at the Brooklyn Museum under the auspices of the WPA Federal Art Project. In 1936, he became an American citizen. Drewes joined other Bauhaus artists in New York to form the core of the American Abstract Artists group. He taught at Columbia University from 1937 to 1940, and served as director of graphic art for the WPA Federal Art Project in New York in 1940. In 1944 he studied printmaking at Stanley William Hayter’s famed Atelier 17.

Drewes was a tenured professor at Washington University in St. Louis, from 1946-to 1965. With his sons grown, Drewes’ time at Washington University in St. Louis was a very creative period, with his focus no longer split between his art and raising and financially supporting his family. After his wife’s passing in 1965, Drewes remarried a jeweler and fellow professor from Washington University, Mary Louise Lischer. Retirement led the couple to Bucks County, Pennsylvania where Drewes’ art focused on abstract landscapes and still lifes. Moving once more to escape the long winters, Virginia became Drewes’ final home, where he continued to create and teach until the age of 85. His paintings and prints have been shown at major museums throughout Europe and the United States.

Werner Drewes’ Farm with Figures (shown above) can be seen at our Georgetown gallery in Washington, D.C.  It would make a fantastic addition to any early 20th century collection.

 

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18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Abstract, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Collagraph, Contemporary, Copperplate, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Landscapes, Linocut, Lithograph, Maps, Mezzotint, Multi-stone Lithograph, Prints, Science, Wood

Print Round-Up: The Moon

In honor of this morning’s “Blood Moon” total lunar eclipse (read about it here), we are sharing a print round-up of our favorite moon related prints. These lunar prints are stunning scientific and artistic representations, from multiple centuries. We hope you enjoy!

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio…. By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio… By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

This is an interesting and decorative map of the surface of the Moon. Doppelmayr was an astronomer as well as a professor of mathematics. He often worked with the Homann heirs.  Together they produced a number of atlases, including Atlas Coelestis and Selenographica.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4" (365 x 210mm). LINK.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4″ (365 x 210mm). LINK.

This print is from Chambers’ and Rees’ Cyclopaedia or, An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. The composite shows diagrams relating to eclipses.

Phases Of The Moon.  By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8" (248 x 217mm). LINK.

Phases Of The Moon. By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8″ (248 x 217mm). LINK.

This chart appeared in Smith’s Illustrated Astronomy, Designed for the Use of the Public or Common Schools in the United States.  This wonderful work was produced by Asa Smith, the Principal of Public School No. 12, in New York City. He notes that the purpose was “to present all distinguishing principles in physical Astronomy with as few words as possible; but with such ocular demonstrations, by way of diagrams and maps, as shall make the subject easily understood.”

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" plus title and margins. LINK.

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ plus title and margins. LINK.

This print is from Das Illustrierte Mississippithal (The Valley of the Mississippi Illustrated).  In the late 1840’s, Henry Lewis traveled the length of the Mississippi and, with the assistance of other artists, assembled a collection of sketches detailing scenery of the entire river.  Based on these drawings, Lewis proceeded to paint a panorama on a continuous length of canvas which would be moved and viewed through a frame.  In the fall of 1848, the completed piece (hundreds and hundreds of feet in length),  began its tour of American cities.  A European tour followed and while in Dusseldorf, in 1853, Lewis teamed up with the publisher Heinrich Arnz to redo the sketches as lithographs, illustrating a book on Mississippi scenery.  While production was sporadic and relatively unprofitable, the resulting seventy-eight lithographs provide a early and remarkably complete record of the Mississippi River.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16" (204 x 151 mm). Link.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16″ (204 x 151 mm). LINK.

This etching by 20th century printmaker John Taylor Arms (1887-1953) is one of many in his oeuvre to include moons or moonlight. The print is an edition of 100 in color and 75 in black and white. This particular impression is an artist proof, and was printed by  Frederick Reynolds. Reynolds was born in London, immigrating to New York in 1911 to establish himself as an artist in the United States. He was an etcher and mezzotint engraver, and operated his own printing studio in New York. In addition to his own works, Reynolds printed for other artists, including Arms.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16". Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right "38". LINK.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16″. Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right “38”. LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8". LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8″. LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16". LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16″. LINK.

Moonrise Tide. (green ink). By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4". LINK.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4″. LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16". LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16″. LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5". LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5″. LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997.  Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11" (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997. Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11″ (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Above are a selection of moon-related prints and drawings from our 20th century and contemporary printmakers. While varying in style and technique, all depict the moon and it’s luminescence casting light and shadows throughout the foreground, making for some very interesting compositions.

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