19th Century Prints, American Views, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Landscapes, Prints

William J. Bennett

William James Bennett (1787-1844) was a British born painter and engraver, known for his series of birds-eye views of American cities and a series of large aquatints of Niagara Falls. Born in London, Bennett studied at the Royal Academy schools, working under Westall to develop his landscape skills. He spent his late teens and early twenties traveling with the British military, first to Egypt and Malta, followed by a later appointment in Italy. His travels expanded his landscape and portraiture skills, gifting an invaluable opportunity for the young artist to sketch both ancient ruins and modern cities and capture landscapes of all visual varieties.

In 1808, Bennett became a founding member of the Associated Artists in Water Colours, and worked out of London for a time. Bennett later moved to the United States in 1826 and was elected a full member of the National Academy of Design just two years later, in 1828. At the Academy he exhibited watercolor landscapes and seascapes as well as his engravings.

From 1830-1840, Bennett produced a series of aquatint topographical city views. Based off paintings of his own and the work of others, this series was immensely successful. In his views Bennett “not only celebrated the beauty of the American landscape, he also recorded the young nation’s growing urban centers, from Boston, Buffalo, and Detroit to New Orleans and Mobile, with a special focus on New York. Bennett recorded the bustling waterfront activity of thriving ports bathed in a luminous light that unified water, ships, and architecture. Capturing the optimism of the new nation, these magnificent aquatints have been regarded as the finest folio views of 19th-century American cities, which set the stage for an independent American school of city views.” (NYPL link). Bennett later painted four views of Niagara Falls, two which became subjects for his own aquatints, two which were translated into aquatints by fellow engraver John Hill.

Below are three prints we have by Bennett, a stunning view of Richmond, a harbor scene of Boston, and (of course) a beautiful view of the Navy Yard in Washington, DC. We hope you enjoy these prints- all three are still available to view and purchase in our Georgetown location!

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8". LINK.  One of the great views of the Nation's Capital. Washington is shown from the south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, est. 1799, behind is the original Capitol Building and to the left is the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8″. LINK.
One of the great views of the Nation’s Capital. Washington is shown from the bucolic south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, established in 1799. Behind is the original Capitol Building with the old dome. To the left sits the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Handcolored aquatint, 1833.  Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8".  LINK.  William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. One of the great views of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling and dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1833. Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8″. LINK.
William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. An attractive and colorful view of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling, dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By Goegre Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8". LINK. One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett's aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as "George Cooke's romantic celebration of Richmond's charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . ." Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor's mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8″. LINK.One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett’s aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as “George Cooke’s romantic celebration of Richmond’s charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . .” Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor’s mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe. REF: Deak 420; Stokes 1833 E-58.

 

 

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Botanical, Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Watercolor

Edith Johnston Watercolors

Our partners in New York City, The Old Print Shop, have a stunning set of floral watercolors by 20th century artist Edith F. Johnston. Not much is know about Johnston, who created during the early to mid 20th century. She was illustrator and co-author (along with Margaret McKinney) of “A Book of Garden Flowers” published in 1941, “A Book of Wayside Fruits” in 1945, as well as “A Book of Wild Flowers” published in 1946. These publications offered rich insight and advice to their readers, with notes on planting windows and care for a multitude of flower varieties. Johnston and McKinney also included light history of each flower, including its use in ancient cultures and any symbolic meanings. Every book featured full-color multi-stone lithographs, after drawings by Johnston.

The original watercolors shown below vary in design and arrangement but all show a propensity towards illustrating with strong and dramatic color palettes. It is possible that several of the watercolors were studies for plants featured in her books. These unique works on paper would make beautiful additions to any natural history collection.

To see more by Edith Johnston, click here.  

Assam, N. E. India, on Brahmaputra R. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, July, 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled in pencil at lower paper edge. Plant identification has been erased - it appears that this was done for a presentation (framing for a show). Signed and dated in image. LINK.

Assam, N. E. India, on Brahmaputra R. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, July, 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled in pencil at lower paper edge. Plant identification has been erased – it appears that this was done for a presentation (framing for a show). Signed and dated in image. LINK.

Pansy & Bleeding Heart. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, undated. Image size 20 7/8 x 15" (531 x 382 mm). Signed by the artist (under leaves) on left side. LINK.

Pansy & Bleeding Heart. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, undated. Image size 20 7/8 x 15″ (531 x 382 mm). Signed by the artist (under leaves) on left side. LINK.

Eggs of Red Snail on Cuperys Alternifolius [umbrella papyrus]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, 1956. Paper size 22 x 14 7/8"558 x 378 mm). Titled and date in pencil along lower paper edge. "May 2, 1956 - O'Brien." Edith Johnston often noted the locations where she drew - possible why O'Brien in noted. LINK.

Eggs of Red Snail on Cuperys Alternifolius [umbrella papyrus]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, 1956. Paper size 22 x 14 7/8″558 x 378 mm). Titled and date in pencil along lower paper edge. “May 2, 1956 – O’Brien.” Edith Johnston often noted the locations where she drew – possible why O’Brien in noted. LINK.

Bog Violet, Butlerwort, Pinquicula lutea, P. elatior, Mill Crk. Rd. Mar. 7, 1957. A&T Gleason. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1957. Paper size 13 7/8 x 9 3/4" (353 x 248 mm). Titled in pencil. Signed Edith E. Johnston. LINK.

Bog Violet, Butlerwort, Pinquicula lutea, P. elatior, Mill Crk. Rd. Mar. 7, 1957. A&T Gleason. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1957. Paper size 13 7/8 x 9 3/4″ (353 x 248 mm). Titled in pencil. Signed Edith E. Johnston. LINK.

Carambola - Averrhoa carambola. Oxalis Family - china. Burma, India. collection of Billings McArthur. Killarney Point, Lake Pillarney, Fla. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated at upper paper edge in pencil. Pencil notes in image. LINK.

Carambola – Averrhoa carambola. Oxalis Family – china. Burma, India. collection of Billings McArthur. Killarney Point, Lake Pillarney, Fla. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated at upper paper edge in pencil. Pencil notes in image. LINK.

Aletris aurea - Golden Colie Root. Mill Crk. Rd. Aut. 24, 55'. KWD Lily family. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated in penci at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK.

Aletris aurea – Golden Colie Root. Mill Crk. Rd. Aut. 24, 55′. KWD Lily family. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated in pencil at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK.

Rosa Laevigato. Cherokee Rose. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, undated circa 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled in penci at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK

Rosa Laevigato. Cherokee Rose. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, undated circa 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled in pencil at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK

Floral Vine [Untitled]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, c.1955. Paper size 18 3/4 x 13 1/8" (47.5 x 33.3 cm). Signed in watercolor. LINK.

Floral Vine [Untitled]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, c.1955. Paper size 18 3/4 x 13 1/8″ (47.5 x 33.3 cm). Signed in watercolor. LINK.

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Bronze, Drawing, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Sculpture, Steel

Soaring into Three Dimensions

The Old Print Shop presents a show of SCULPTURE and DRAWINGS by Robert Cook and Masaaki Noda

May 10 – June 27

Opening Reception Saturday, May 10, from 1-4pm

Long-known as a prominent resource for prints and works on paper, our partner, The Old Print Shop in NYC, is expanding its repertoire with an exhibit of two artists, each notably accomplished in the discipline of sculpture. The street-level gallery, recently created to show contemporary art, has been further configured to accommodate this show.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Cook was born in Boston in 1921. He studied with George Demetrios, a classical sculptor. During WWII he served in Europe as an engineer making maps and models. After the war he stayed in Paris to study with Marcel Gaumont at L’Academie des Beaux Arts. In 1948 he moved to Rome. He is an innovator in the “lost wax” process of casting, creating larger sculptures than had previously been possible. He has a number of major public sculptures in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Saudi Arabia, Italy and Canberra, Australia. His work, “Dinoceras,” is in New York at Park Avenue and 51st Street. His works are in the Victoria and Albert Museum, The British Museum, the Hirshorn Collection, the Whitney Museum and the Mobile Museum of Art. He draws inspiration for his sculptures from dance, theater, sports and animals. Jazz music infuses his studio as he works.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995. Link.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995.

Masaaki Noda was born in Hiroshima, Japan, in 1949. He studied at Osaka University of Arts, and in 1977 he came to the United States and studied at The Art Students League. He pursues sculpture in a unique way, making paper and clay models until he has the exact design he is seeking. He has had numerous public installations in Japan, Greece, and China, including an exhibition of his work at the Shenzhen Museum of Art in China. His work is in numerous public collections including the Brooklyn Museum, Fukuyama Museum of Art in Japan, Hiroshima Perfectural Art Museum, Portland Art Museum, Philadelphia Museum of Art and Shenzhen Museum of Art. Masaaki draws inspiration from the artistic conflict between form and abstraction.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

For more information on this show, go to The Old Print Shop website: www.oldprintshop.com.

If you are in the New York area, we invite you to come and see the show. Both artists will be at the opening reception on Saturday, May 10th from 1 till 4 pm. Masaaki Noda will be there in person and Robert Cook will attend from Italy, via Skype.

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19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Pencil Drawing, Photo engraving, Prints, Sporting, Watercolor, Wood, Woodcut

Print Round-Up: Bicycles

From the earliest depictions of penny farthings and velocipedes on dirt lanes, to modern-day prints of bike commuters navigating busy city streets, our prints celebrate and illustrate the convenience, athleticism, and joy of cycling.  Some of our historic prints show the bicycle in its earliest stages of development- with over-sized front wheels, or still lacking pedals or gears. They also highlight the beginnings of a strong “bike culture” in the 19th century. Many took to this popular form of transportation and amusement, going on long afternoon group rides or joining cycling clubs. We also have several great racing prints, showing fans at the velodrome, watching racers sprint around and around. Contemporary artists like Art Werger, Susan Pyzow, and Su-Li Hung have also depicted cyclists in their prints.

We hope you enjoy our bike print round-up, and we invite you to visit our Washington DC and New York City galleries to view these prints in person!

Tourists. By A. B. Frost. Published by Harper's Weekly. Photoengraving, hand colored, 1896. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2" (215 x 317 mm). AT OPG.

Tourists. By A. B. Frost. Published by Harper’s Weekly. Photoengraving, hand colored, 1896. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2″ (215 x 317 mm). AT OPG.

Six-Day Bike Race. BY Joseph W. Golinkin. Watercolor, c.1940. Image size 20 x 24" (508 x 610 mm). AT OPS.

Six-Day Bike Race. By Joseph W. Golinkin. Watercolor, c.1940. Image size 20 x 24″ (508 x 610 mm). AT OPS.

Bicyclist. By Susan Pyzow.  Etching, 2002. Image size 9 x 11 7/8" (225 x 300 mm). Edition 40. AT OPG.

Bicyclist. By Susan Pyzow. Etching, 2002. Image size 9 x 11 7/8″ (225 x 300 mm). Edition 40. AT OPG.

Cyclist Duo. By Richard Sloat. Etching, 2003. Image size 6 x 9 1/2" (152 x 240 mm). Edition 7. AT OPS.

Cyclist Duo. By Richard Sloat. Etching, 2003. Image size 6 x 9 1/2″ (152 x 240 mm). Edition 7. AT OPS.

Bike Lane, Queensborough Bridge. By Steven E. Walker. Woodcut, 2005. Image size 9 9/16 x 7 1/8" (243 x 180 mm). Edition 75. AT OPG.

Bike Lane, Queensborough Bridge. By Steven E. Walker. Woodcut, 2005. Image size 9 9/16 x 7 1/8″ (243 x 180 mm). Edition 75. AT OPG.

A Velocipede of Fifty Years Ago. Published in Harper's Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, 1869. Image size 4 3/16 x 5 3/4" (105 x 146 mm). AT OPS.

A Velocipede of Fifty Years Ago. Published in Harper’s Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, 1869. Image size 4 3/16 x 5 3/4″ (105 x 146 mm). AT OPS.

Bicycle in America.  The Germantown Bicycle Club starting out for a Race. By W. P. Snyder. Published in Harper's Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, Feb. 7, 1880.  Image size 6 5/8 x 9 1/8" (168 x 231 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycle in America. The Germantown Bicycle Club starting out for a Race. By W. P. Snyder. Published in Harper’s Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, Feb. 7, 1880. Image size 6 5/8 x 9 1/8″ (168 x 231 mm). AT OPG.

A Tour Awheel. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper's Weekly. Photogravure, 1899. Image size 6 1/2 x 8 3/8" (164 x 211 mm). AT OPS.

A Tour Awheel. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper’s Weekly. Photogravure, 1899. Image size 6 1/2 x 8 3/8″ (164 x 211 mm). AT OPS.

Figure Study, Woman on Bicycle. By Martin Lewis. Pencil on paper, c.1935. Image size 7 x 3 1/8" (178 x 80 mm). AT OPS.

Figure Study, Woman on Bicycle. By Martin Lewis. Pencil on paper, c.1935. Image size 7 x 3 1/8″ (178 x 80 mm). AT OPS.

Bicycle. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 2007. Image size 11 3/4 x 12 1/4" (298 x 315 mm). Edition 50. AT OPS.

Bicycle. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 2007. Image size 11 3/4 x 12 1/4″ (298 x 315 mm). Edition 50. AT OPS.

Wheeling on Riverside Drive. BY T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, July 17, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8" (343 x 556 mm.) AT OPG.

Wheeling on Riverside Drive. By T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, July 17, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8″ (343 x 556 mm.) AT OPG.

The Velodrome de la Seine: The Grand-stand. By Georges Scott. Wood engraving, c.1880. Image size 12 1/4 x 19 5/8" (310 x 499 mm.) AT OPG.

The Velodrome de la Seine: The Grand-stand. By Georges Scott. Wood engraving, c.1880. Image size 12 1/4 x 19 5/8″ (310 x 499 mm.) AT OPG.

The Century Run. By Jay Hambidge. Published by Truth Company. Color photoengraving, 1897. Image size 11 x 17 7/8" (273 x 455 mm.). AT OPG.

The Century Run. By Jay Hambidge. Published by Truth Company. Color photoengraving, 1897. Image size 11 x 17 7/8″ (273 x 455 mm.). AT OPG.

Cycling in England - Down the Ripley Road. By Joseph Pennell. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York, Oct. 22, 1887. Wood engraving, hand colored, 1887. Image size  9 1/4 x 12 5/8" (236 x 325 mm). AT OPG.

Cycling in England – Down the Ripley Road. By Joseph Pennell. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York, Oct. 22, 1887. Wood engraving, hand colored, 1887. Image size 9 1/4 x 12 5/8″ (236 x 325 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycling on Riverside Drive, New York. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Photoengraving, hand colored, c. 1895. Image size 8 1/2 x 13 1/4" (214 x 339 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycling on Riverside Drive, New York. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Photoengraving, hand colored, c. 1895. Image size 8 1/2 x 13 1/4″ (214 x 339 mm). AT OPG.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Image size 13 1/8 x 9 3/16" (333 x 245 mm). Ed 25. AT OPG.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Image size 13 1/8 x 9 3/16″ (333 x 245 mm). Ed 25. AT OPG.

AT OPG= Print is located at The Old Print Gallery, 1220 31st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007. www.oldprintgallery.com  t: 202-965-1818

AT OPS= Print is located at The Old Print Shop, 150 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY, 10016. www.oldprintshop.com  t:212-683-3950

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Collagraph, Contemporary, Monotype, New Additions, Prints, Watercolor

New Additions: Philip Bennet

NEW ADDITIONS banner

NEW ADDITIONSPhilip Bennet is a local DC printmaker, specializing in abstract and dynamic monotypes. Using a mixture of watercolors and acrylic paints, Bennet’s images are always an intense, rich mix of color. The works below are newer additions to our contemporary collection- and we are very happy to share them with our gallery visitors and blog readers. To learn more about Philip Bennet, read his printmaker Q&A, where he speaks to his printing methods and the source of his inspiration.

Whorl. Philip Bennet. Monotype, oil based ink, 2008.

Whorl. Philip Bennet. Monotype, oil based ink, 2008.

Green Rain. Philip Bennet. Acrylic on paper, 2001.

Green Rain. Philip Bennet. Acrylic on paper, 2001.

Vermillion. Philip Bennet. Monotype, oil based ink, 2012.

Vermillion. Philip Bennet. Monotype, oil based ink, 2012.

Compass Point. Philip Bennet. Monotype, watercolor and oil based ink, 2013.

Compass Point. Philip Bennet. Monotype, watercolor and oil based ink, 2013.

Doves. Philip Bennet. Watercolor over gesso, on paper, 1999.

Doves. Philip Bennet. Watercolor over gesso, on paper, 1999.

Crazy Rhythm. Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype, 2010.

Crazy Rhythm. Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype, 2010.

Ribbons. Philip Bennet. Watercolor & oil-based ink monotype, 2005.

Ribbons. Philip Bennet. Watercolor & oil-based ink monotype, 2005.

Nuclei. Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype/collagraph, 2010.

Nuclei. Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype/collagraph, 2010.

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