19th Century Prints, American Views, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Landscapes, Prints

William J. Bennett

William James Bennett (1787-1844) was a British born painter and engraver, known for his series of birds-eye views of American cities and a series of large aquatints of Niagara Falls. Born in London, Bennett studied at the Royal Academy schools, working under Westall to develop his landscape skills. He spent his late teens and early twenties traveling with the British military, first to Egypt and Malta, followed by a later appointment in Italy. His travels expanded his landscape and portraiture skills, gifting an invaluable opportunity for the young artist to sketch both ancient ruins and modern cities and capture landscapes of all visual varieties.

In 1808, Bennett became a founding member of the Associated Artists in Water Colours, and worked out of London for a time. Bennett later moved to the United States in 1826 and was elected a full member of the National Academy of Design just two years later, in 1828. At the Academy he exhibited watercolor landscapes and seascapes as well as his engravings.

From 1830-1840, Bennett produced a series of aquatint topographical city views. Based off paintings of his own and the work of others, this series was immensely successful. In his views Bennett “not only celebrated the beauty of the American landscape, he also recorded the young nation’s growing urban centers, from Boston, Buffalo, and Detroit to New Orleans and Mobile, with a special focus on New York. Bennett recorded the bustling waterfront activity of thriving ports bathed in a luminous light that unified water, ships, and architecture. Capturing the optimism of the new nation, these magnificent aquatints have been regarded as the finest folio views of 19th-century American cities, which set the stage for an independent American school of city views.” (NYPL link). Bennett later painted four views of Niagara Falls, two which became subjects for his own aquatints, two which were translated into aquatints by fellow engraver John Hill.

Below are three prints we have by Bennett, a stunning view of Richmond, a harbor scene of Boston, and (of course) a beautiful view of the Navy Yard in Washington, DC. We hope you enjoy these prints- all three are still available to view and purchase in our Georgetown location!

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8". LINK.  One of the great views of the Nation's Capital. Washington is shown from the south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, est. 1799, behind is the original Capitol Building and to the left is the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8″. LINK.
One of the great views of the Nation’s Capital. Washington is shown from the bucolic south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, established in 1799. Behind is the original Capitol Building with the old dome. To the left sits the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Handcolored aquatint, 1833.  Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8".  LINK.  William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. One of the great views of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling and dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1833. Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8″. LINK.
William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. An attractive and colorful view of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling, dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By Goegre Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8". LINK. One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett's aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as "George Cooke's romantic celebration of Richmond's charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . ." Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor's mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8″. LINK.One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett’s aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as “George Cooke’s romantic celebration of Richmond’s charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . .” Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor’s mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe. REF: Deak 420; Stokes 1833 E-58.

 

 

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2014 Holiday Gift Guide

We are less than a week until Christmas, and if you are like us, you are probably still searching for one or two last-minute gifts for that special someone (or someones!). We have you covered! We have always believed that art makes the BEST gifts. It is meaningful, special, and unlike the go-to Christmas sweater, always the right size. We have prints and maps for all interests, at all price points. Stop by our gallery or visit our website www.oldprintgallery.com to browse our collection of historic, antique, decorative, and fine original art. 

Below is a Holiday Gift Guide for 2014, with ideas for everyone on your list. We hope you enjoy our selections, and if you need more ideas, give us a call or stop by our gallery and we will be happy to help you find something fantastic. Happy shopping and Happy Holidays!

For the Cook:

Summer King Apple. Plate III. E. I. Schutt. Published by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Chromolithograph, 1912. Image size 6 1/4 x 3 3/8" (158 x 85 mm). LINK.  Lithographed by Julius Bien Co. Lith. From the USDA Yearbook. A beautiful chromolithograph of an apple, with a cross section of the apple below.

Summer King Apple. Plate III. E. I. Schutt. Published by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Chromolithograph, 1912. Image size 6 1/4 x 3 3/8″ (158 x 85 mm). LINK.
Lithographed by Julius Bien Co. Lith. From the USDA Yearbook. A beautiful chromolithograph of an apple, with a cross section of the apple below.

For the Sports Fan:

Lacrosse.  "Hard Pressed." T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, Aug 21, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8" (348 x 506 mm.). LINK.  Lacrosse, today a popular team sport in North America, may have developed as early as 1100 AD among indigenous peoples on the continent. By the seventeenth century, it was well-established. It was documented by Jesuit missionary priests in the territory of present-day Canada, although the game has undergone many modifications since that time.

Lacrosse. “Hard Pressed.” T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, Aug 21, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8″ (348 x 506 mm.). LINK.
Lacrosse, today a popular team sport in North America, may have developed as early as 1100 AD among indigenous peoples on the continent. By the seventeenth century, it was well-established. It was documented by Jesuit missionary priests in the territory of present-day Canada, although the game has undergone many modifications since that time.

For the Washingtonian:

Map of Washington, D.C.  George H. Walker. Published by the Walker Lith. & Pub. Co. Boston. Multi-stone lithograph, c.1900. Image size 21 1/2 x 26 1/4" plus margins. LINK.   A pleasant view of the city from the turn of the last century. Outlined in red are the many trolley lines that once ran in the city and suburbs. The Walker Co. was formed in 1880 by George Hiram Walker and his brother Oscar.  They were very prolific, publishing maps, atlases and bird's eye views of New England locales.  The Walkers were the last of Boston's important lithographers.  President George  Bush is a descendant of this family.

Map of Washington, D.C. George H. Walker. Published by the Walker Lith. & Pub. Co. Boston. Multi-stone lithograph, c.1900. Image size 21 1/2 x 26 1/4″ plus margins. LINK.
A pleasant view of the city from the turn of the last century. Outlined in red are the many trolley lines that once ran in the city and suburbs. The Walker Co. was formed in 1880 by George Hiram Walker and his brother Oscar. They were very prolific, publishing maps, atlases, and bird’s eye views of New England and East Coast locales. The Walkers were the last of Boston’s important lithographers. President George Bush is a descendant of this family.

For the World Traveler:

Encampment of the Travellers. By Karl Bodmer. Published by Ackermann & Co., London. Aquatint engraving, 1843-44. Image size 7 1/2 x 11" (190 x 290 mm) plus title and margins. From "Travels in the Interior of North America"  by Maximilian, Prince of Wied-Neuwied.  In 1832, the German prince, Maximilian of Wied, organized an expedition to explore the region along the Missouri River.  He was accompanied by Karl Bodmer, a young Swiss artist, who recorded in pictorial form all he observed.  Following the Lewis & Clark trail up the Missouri River, they traveled 5,000 miles during the course of a year.  Maximilian kept detailed notes on a day-by-day basis for his book, which was published six years later in German, French, and English editions and included Bodmer's aquatint engravings.  Karl Bodmer's landscapes, portraits, and splendid scenes of Indian life are regarded today as first rate picture histories of the western frontier at that time. Engraved by Outhwaite.  Printed by de Bougeard. LINK.

Encampment of the Travellers. By Karl Bodmer. Published by Ackermann & Co., London. Aquatint engraving, 1843-44. Image size 7 1/2 x 11″ (190 x 290 mm) plus title and margins. LINK.
From “Travels in the Interior of North America” by Maximilian, Prince of Wied-Neuwied. In 1832, the German prince, Maximilian of Wied, organized an expedition to explore the region along the Missouri River. He was accompanied by Karl Bodmer, a young Swiss artist, who recorded in pictorial form all he observed. Following the Lewis & Clark trail up the Missouri River, they traveled 5,000 miles during the course of a year. Maximilian kept detailed notes on a day-by-day basis for his book, which was published six years later in German, French, and English editions and included Bodmer’s aquatint engravings. Karl Bodmer’s landscapes, portraits, and splendid scenes of Indian life are regarded today as first rate picture histories of the western frontier at that time. Engraved by Outhwaite. Printed by de Bougeard.

For the History-Buff:

John Paul Jones. C. J. Notte. Published by  Carl Guttenberg, Paris. Engraving, 1780. Image size 10 11/16 x 9 1/16”, plus publication line and margins. LINK.  Title continues: "Commodore au Service des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique...". Engraved by Carl Guttenberg. John Paul Jones( 1747-1792) was an American naval officer, famous for his exploits in British waters during the American Revolution. As captain of the Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones fought an epic battle against Captain Pearson’s ship Serapis. It is during this battle that he uttered his famous words "I have not yet begun to fight". The engraving shows Jones on the deck of ship, dramatically emerging from smoke and musket fire. Although the engraver, Carl Guttenberg, was from Nuremberg, he lived in France and like many French at the time, was deeply connected to the American cause. The French admired Jones for his heroism and celebrated his success, making this print popular not only in America, but France as well.

John Paul Jones. C. J. Notte. Published by Carl Guttenberg, Paris. Engraving, 1780. Image size 10 11/16 x 9 1/16”, plus publication line and margins. LINK.
Title continues: “Commodore au Service des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique…”. Engraved by Carl Guttenberg. John Paul Jones (1747-1792) was an American naval officer, famous for his exploits in British waters during the American Revolution. As captain of the Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones fought an epic battle against Captain Pearson’s ship Serapis. It is during this battle that he uttered his famous words “I have not yet begun to fight”. The engraving shows Jones on the deck of ship, dramatically emerging from smoke and musket fire. Although the engraver, Carl Guttenberg, was from Nuremberg, he lived in France and like many French at the time, was deeply connected to the American cause. The French admired Jones for his heroism and celebrated his success, making this print popular not only in America, but in France as well.

For the Nature-Lover:

a. Cardamomum munis Cardamoe. b. Cardamonum longum vel medium. N. 306. (Cardamom). Johann W. Weinmann. Published Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-45. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8 inches. LINK. From Johann Wilhelm Weinmann's Phytanthoza Iconographia. This beautiful work provides a nearly complete record of the flowers, fruits and vegetables cultivated in the early 18th century. The plates are among the earliest examples of color printing from a single plate.

a. Cardamomum munis Cardamoe. b. Cardamonum longum vel medium. N. 306. (Cardamom). Johann W. Weinmann. Published Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-45. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8 inches. LINK.
From Johann Wilhelm Weinmann’s “Phytanthoza Iconographia.” This beautiful work provides a nearly complete record of the flowers, fruits and vegetables cultivated in the early 18th century. The plates are among the earliest examples of color printing from a single plate.

For the Map Enthusiast:

A Map of the Most Inhabited part of Virginia containing the whole Province of Maryland with Part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina. Drawn by Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson in 1775. Printed for Robt. Sayer at No. 53 in Fleet Street. Copper plate engraving, c.1777. Four-sheet map, joined into two sheets. Overall, if joined, 31 x 48 1/4. LINK.   This important map of Virginia was commissioned by the English Lords of Trade, who in 1750 required each colony to conduct a comprehensive survey. Joshua Fry, a mathematician, and Peter Jefferson, a surveyor and father of Thomas Jefferson, were appointed to execute the commission. The resulting map is highly detailed, giving roads, ferry crossings, settlements and names of many of the rivers and creeks. It is also the first map to depict the general configuration of the Appalachian and Allegheny mountain ranges. The cartouche depicts an image of the Virginia tobacco trade. The map was first issued in 1751. Other editions were done in 1755 onward through 1794. This particular map is from the 1775 edition and likely appeared in Thomas Jefferys' "The American Atlas."

A Map of the Most Inhabited part of Virginia containing the whole Province of Maryland with Part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina. Drawn by Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson in 1775. Printed for Robt. Sayer at No. 53 in Fleet Street. Copper plate engraving, c.1777. Four-sheet map, joined into two sheets. Overall, if joined, 31 x 48 1/4. LINK.
This important map of Virginia was commissioned by the English Lords of Trade, who in 1750 required each colony to conduct a comprehensive survey. Joshua Fry, a mathematician, and Peter Jefferson, a surveyor and father of Thomas Jefferson, were appointed to execute the commission. The resulting map is highly detailed, giving roads, ferry crossings, settlements and names of many of the rivers and creeks. It is also the first map to depict the general configuration of the Appalachian and Allegheny mountain ranges. The cartouche depicts an image of the Virginia tobacco trade. The map was first issued in 1751. Other editions were done in 1755 onward through 1794. This particular map is from the 1775 edition and likely appeared in Thomas Jefferys’ “The American Atlas.”

For the Kids:

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew.  Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2 inches. LINK.  Edition of 55. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. A fanciful image of a boat, castle, and friendly creatures. printed in beautiful colors.

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2 inches. LINK.
Edition of 55. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. A fanciful image of a boat, castle, and friendly creatures. Printed in three beautiful colors.

For the City-Slicker:

Gotham Lights. Michael Di Cerbo. Etching, aquatint, and drypoint, 2005. Image size 11 7/8 x 8 13/16 inches. LINK.  Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil by artist. Micahel DiCerbo is a NEw York City based artist. Di Cerbo has turned his sense of urban grandeur into geometric forms with patterns of light and dark that allude to the soaring architecture of skyscrapers. One sees the city from the perspective of both an ant and eagle, moving endlessly upward or falling away to infinite chasms below. The images, though devoid of people and any overt sign of life, create an ambiance of mystery. One may find themselves alone in a composition as an observer of a timeless cityscape.

Gotham Lights. Michael Di Cerbo. Etching, aquatint, and drypoint, 2005. Image size 11 7/8 x 8 13/16 inches. LINK.
Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil by artist. Micahel DiCerbo is a NEw York City based artist. Di Cerbo has turned his sense of urban grandeur into geometric forms with patterns of light and dark that allude to the soaring architecture of skyscrapers. One sees the city from the perspective of both an ant and eagle, moving endlessly upward or falling away to infinite chasms below. The images, though devoid of people and any overt sign of life, create an ambiance of mystery. One may find themselves alone in a composition as an observer of a timeless citiscape.

For the Contemporary:

Dreamscape #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2010. Image size 13 3/4 x 9 7/8 inches. LINK. Signed and titled in pencil by the artist. Ed 1/1. Bennet’s medium of choice is the monotype, abstract and dynamic images achieved as a result of his playful and liberal approach to printmaking. He experiments with colored inks of varied viscosity, often employing hued “ghost” images as backgrounds for new prints and integrating multiple plates into each composition. His unrestricted and unique working style allows for a spontaneity and creative freedom not normally associated with printmaking.

Dreamscape #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2010. Image size 13 3/4 x 9 7/8 inches. LINK.
Signed and titled in pencil by the artist. Ed 1/1. Bennet’s medium of choice is the monotype, abstract and dynamic images achieved as a result of his playful and liberal approach to printmaking. He experiments with colored inks of varied viscosity, often employing hued “ghost” images as backgrounds for new prints and integrating multiple plates into each composition. His unrestricted and unique working style allows for a spontaneity and creative freedom not normally associated with printmaking.

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Historic America video tour of The Old Print Gallery

Last week we filmed with Aaron Killian, writer, historian, and president and founder of Historic America. Aaron is dedicated to bringing the history of our country to life through interactive publishing, tours, and the creation of digital historic research material. We were thrilled to be asked to do a video with him about our collection of historic prints- and to share our unique inventory with a whole new group of followers and history enthusiasts.

In the video, we share seven prints from our inventory, touch upon the role of prints throughout history, and talk a bit about our long 40+ year history as a gallery. It was fun morning of filming- Aaron was an engaging host, and kept the whole process super easy for this video newbie, asking stimulating and smart questions and sharing interesting facts along the way.

For more information on the prints show in the video, follow the links below:
Montanus 17th century view of St. Augustine
Edward Savage portrait of the Washington Family
Original Washington Monument Plan
Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln
Currier and Ives’ lithograph of The Battle of Bull Run
Colton’s Washington DC map
DC Circus Poster

We hope you enjoy the video! Thanks again to Aaron Killian of Historic America– we encourage all of our blog readers to book a tour with Aaron you will see DC in a whole new light and learn a lot! Also, make sure to check out the Historic America blog– you can spend hours watching his videos and reading about our nation’s past (and present)- a fantastic site for history-buffs.

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Print Round-Up: The Moon

In honor of this morning’s “Blood Moon” total lunar eclipse (read about it here), we are sharing a print round-up of our favorite moon related prints. These lunar prints are stunning scientific and artistic representations, from multiple centuries. We hope you enjoy!

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio…. By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio… By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

This is an interesting and decorative map of the surface of the Moon. Doppelmayr was an astronomer as well as a professor of mathematics. He often worked with the Homann heirs.  Together they produced a number of atlases, including Atlas Coelestis and Selenographica.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4" (365 x 210mm). LINK.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4″ (365 x 210mm). LINK.

This print is from Chambers’ and Rees’ Cyclopaedia or, An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. The composite shows diagrams relating to eclipses.

Phases Of The Moon.  By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8" (248 x 217mm). LINK.

Phases Of The Moon. By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8″ (248 x 217mm). LINK.

This chart appeared in Smith’s Illustrated Astronomy, Designed for the Use of the Public or Common Schools in the United States.  This wonderful work was produced by Asa Smith, the Principal of Public School No. 12, in New York City. He notes that the purpose was “to present all distinguishing principles in physical Astronomy with as few words as possible; but with such ocular demonstrations, by way of diagrams and maps, as shall make the subject easily understood.”

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" plus title and margins. LINK.

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ plus title and margins. LINK.

This print is from Das Illustrierte Mississippithal (The Valley of the Mississippi Illustrated).  In the late 1840’s, Henry Lewis traveled the length of the Mississippi and, with the assistance of other artists, assembled a collection of sketches detailing scenery of the entire river.  Based on these drawings, Lewis proceeded to paint a panorama on a continuous length of canvas which would be moved and viewed through a frame.  In the fall of 1848, the completed piece (hundreds and hundreds of feet in length),  began its tour of American cities.  A European tour followed and while in Dusseldorf, in 1853, Lewis teamed up with the publisher Heinrich Arnz to redo the sketches as lithographs, illustrating a book on Mississippi scenery.  While production was sporadic and relatively unprofitable, the resulting seventy-eight lithographs provide a early and remarkably complete record of the Mississippi River.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16" (204 x 151 mm). Link.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16″ (204 x 151 mm). LINK.

This etching by 20th century printmaker John Taylor Arms (1887-1953) is one of many in his oeuvre to include moons or moonlight. The print is an edition of 100 in color and 75 in black and white. This particular impression is an artist proof, and was printed by  Frederick Reynolds. Reynolds was born in London, immigrating to New York in 1911 to establish himself as an artist in the United States. He was an etcher and mezzotint engraver, and operated his own printing studio in New York. In addition to his own works, Reynolds printed for other artists, including Arms.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16". Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right "38". LINK.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16″. Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right “38”. LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8". LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8″. LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16". LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16″. LINK.

Moonrise Tide. (green ink). By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4". LINK.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4″. LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16". LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16″. LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5". LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5″. LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997.  Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11" (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997. Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11″ (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Above are a selection of moon-related prints and drawings from our 20th century and contemporary printmakers. While varying in style and technique, all depict the moon and it’s luminescence casting light and shadows throughout the foreground, making for some very interesting compositions.

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War Telegram Marking Map

War Telegram Marking Map. Published by L. Prang & Co. Boston. Lithograph, 1862. Image size 33 3/8 x 22 3/8" (850 x 567 mm) plus margins. Good condition save for repared splitting along fold lines. Backed with japan paper. LINK.

War Telegram Marking Map. Published by L. Prang & Co. Boston. Lithograph, 1862. Image size 33 3/8 x 22 3/8″ (850 x 567 mm) plus margins. Good condition save for repared splitting along fold lines. Backed with japan paper.

This large scale Civil War map depicts the area between Richmond and Baltimore in good detail. In the “Explanations” below the map, map publisher L. Prang states that “The extraordinary large scale on which this map is drawn has been adopted to make it just what we designed it to be, namely 1st The most distinct map ever published of the whole Virginia Territory; where the decisive battles for the Union will be fought, 2nd A Marking Map, that is a map to mark the change of positions of the Union Forces in Red Pencil and the Rebel Forces in Blue, on the receipt of Every Telegram from the seat of war…” He goes on to say that he will furnish the necessary colored pencils and that “with the aid of a little soft bread”, prior markings can be erased to show the latest developments.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing "Explanation" written by publisher L. Prang.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing “Explanation” written by publisher L. Prang.

Printed in brown-black ink, this is a fascinating historical map. Our impression has colored pencil markings, to depict troop movements of both the Union and Confederate troops, around Washington, Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Yorktown.

The telegraph was invented in 1844 by Samuel F. B. Morse and revolutionized communications. He utilized one wire to carry the entire alphabet rather than a wire for each letter. By the time the Civil War erupted, President Abraham Lincoln encouraged the use of the telegram and had a telegraph office set up in the war room. Traveling telegraph wagons followed troops into the field.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Richmond, Va.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Richmond, Va. Blue pencil markings signified Confederate forces.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements of Union and Confederate forces near Washington, DC and Alexandria, VA.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements of Union and Confederate forces near Washington, DC and Alexandria, VA. Red pencil markings denote Union troops, blue pencil markings denote Confederate troops.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Yorktown, VA.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Yorktown, Hampton, and Ft. Norfolk.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Fredericksburg.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Fredericksburg, VA.

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