18th Century Prints, Botanical, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Views, Landscapes, Prints

Volckamer Citrus Fruit Prints

Today we are sharing stunning 18th century engravings from Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” A wealthy Nuremberg merchant who had his own fine orangery, Johann C. Volckamer engaged a variety of artists and engravers, including the architectural artist Paul Decker, to produce plates for this distinctive work. Most of the plates are devoted to citrus fruits, bedecked with ribbon and positioned above views of the gardens, town squares, and palaces of Germany, Austria, and Italy. These unusual engravings are prized for their unique combination of botanical illustrations and 18th century garden designs.

Cedrato con fior e Sugo doppio. Page 174. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrato con fior e Sugo doppio. Page 174. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

In the 18th century, most European gardeners were moving away from ornamental gardens and towards practical gardening of vegetables, herbs, and fruits. Gardens in colder planting zones were enclosed against insects, vermin, and the chilly climate, gifting the gardeners an opportunity to grow and cultivate citrus fruit trees for the first time. While the culture of fruit was the subject of many books- gardeners manuals with instructions as to care and pruning were in abundance- there were comparatively few illustrated books dealing with fruit alone in the beginning of the century. Published in 1708, Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides” was one of the first illustrated books dedicated to citrus fruits.

Limon Cedrato. Page 68. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 68. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 162. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 162. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

The first volume of “Nurnbergische Hesperides” contained 115 plates, mostly uncolored. Separated into 5 parts, the book’s first four sections focus solely on citrus fruits, while the fifth is devoted to flowers. The plates were engraved by L. C. Glotsh, and were the work of artists P. Decker, B. Kinkel, and I. C. Steinberger.

A continuation, or second volume, of “Nurnbergische Hesperides” was published in 1714, with 132 plates. Again, the plates depict mostly citrus fruits, with the exception of the last section, which highlights pineapple, palm, and coconut trees.The plates were engraved by  J. C. Dehne and J. Montalegre, and were the work of artists Delsenbach, T. G. Beckh, Krieger, and F. P. Lidner.

Aranzo da Portugal. Page 194b. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Aranzo da Portugal. Page 194b. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Limon cornagione. Page 144a. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon cornagione. Page 144a. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedrati musciati. Page 61. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrati musciati. Page 61. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedro di fiore e Sugo doppia. Page 118. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedro di fiore e Sugo doppia. Page 118. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Lima Romana. Page 152. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Lima Romana. Page 152. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedrato Bergamotto. Page 52.  Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrato Bergamotto. Page 52. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

 

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Color Lithograph, Lithograph, Prints

View of Washington City

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View of Washington City. Published by E. Sachse & Co., Baltimore, Md. Lithograph printed in color, 1867. Image size 17 7/8 x 27″ (455 x 685 mm). Lith. & printed in colors by E. Sachse & Co. Agents: Charles Magnus & Co., New York, Casimir Bohn, Washington D.C.

 

This print is one of the greatest views of the capitol and the city of Washington. It was printed and published by E. Sachse, a printmaker famous for his sweeping views of cities. In this Washington view, the new Capitol building stands in the foreground, with the rest of the capital city laid out in the background. The Capitol building is artfully depicted with its domed rotunda, the old Senate and House chambers (incorrectly drawn without their domes), and the new legislative wings, identified by their elongated skylights.

Stretched out beyond the Capitol, one sees the red-bricked Smithsonian Castle. The red sandstone was harvested from nearby Seneca Creek, Maryland. When it was completed in 1855, the Castle sat on an isolated piece of land cut off from downtown Washington, DC, by a canal. In the ensuing decades, the Castle became the anchor for the National Mall, as additional museums and government buildings were constructed around it.

The Washington Monument is also visible in Sachse’s view, although incorrectly depicted. It is shown as if constructed by its original plan, drawn by architect Robert Mills years earlier. At the time of printing, the construction of Washington Monument had been halted due to a lack of funds. It was not until 1876 that construction would once again commence, and Mills’ original concept of an ornate and embellished obelisk surrounded by a ring of columns (shown here) would be scraped for a cleaner and more minimal design.

The Old Patent Office, the White House, and the Long Bridge pop up in the distance, and lead the eye towards the busy Potomac River, Georgetown Heights, and the wooded farm land of NW Washington.

To see this print in person, stop by our gallery. We are open Tuesday- Saturday, from 10am to 5:20pm. You can also view it on our website, link here.

 

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18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, American Views, Botanical, Early 20th Century, Foreign Maps, Foreign Views, Gallery Updates, Genre, Maps, Natural History, Naval, Prints, World Maps

OPS at 2013 Winter Antiques Show

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Our partners, The Old Print Shop, are participating in this year’s Winter Antiques Show, held at the Park Avenue Armory in New York City. Opening today, January 25th, and running until February 3rd, the Winter Antiques Show is a prestigious show where unusual examples of art, craftsmanship & history can be seen, discussed, and purchased- a great opportunity for any antique print collector.

The Old Print Shop has participated in this memorable show for over 50 years! This year, they will have on hand a wonderful selection of early American historical prints, town views, maps and natural history prints – as well as 20th century master prints by the likes of George Bellows, Edward Hopper, Childe Hassam, Blanche Lazzell, and Martin Lewis, among others.

101You can visit them at Booth 19. The show is open daily 12 p.m. – 8 p.m, Sundays & Thursdays 12 p.m. – 6 p.m. Daily tickets are $20.00.

Follow the link below for more information, including directions, special programs and lectures. You can also purchase your tickets for the fair online: http://www.winterantiquesshow.com/

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18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Views, Lithograph, New Additions, Prints, Steel plate engraving, Wood

New Additions: Views of Asia

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe have recently added several new prints to our website- all foreign views of China, Japan, and Southeast Asia. The majority of them are steel engravings or toned lithographs, coming from 19th century travel books. The scenes capture important shipping ports, fantastic and lively village scenes, and several views of monasteries and temples. Priced relatively low- most under $100- these scenes make great gifts for the world explorer on your list, and are also a great way to remember your own travel experiences. Enjoy!

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