Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Natural History, Prints

FEATHERED

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its new winter show, FEATHERED, which will open on February 19th and run through April 9th, 2016. FEATHERED will celebrate the beauty, power, and reverence of winged animals, captured in prints. Artists have been forever fascinated by birds and their ability to gracefully navigate the open skies on stretched wings, suspended between earth, sky, and water, hopping from perch to perch. FEATHERED showcases the work of three celebrated natural history and ornithological printmakers from the 20th century- Frank W. Benson, H. Emerson Tuttle, and Stow Wengenroth. Each artist offers a unique, distinctive approach to depicting birds is in their prints, which makes for a varied and compelling grouping on the wall.

The prints of Frank W. Benson (1862-1951), nicknamed the father of sporting art, suggest the perspective of a naturalist and bird hunter. His close and watchful examination of a bird’s flight path and tendencies in the water offer a firsthand record of nature, gleaned not from dead models in a studio, but from a close familiarity of birds in the wild. Captured in Benson’s spare compositions and delicate line work, their vital essence is expressed in the way the birds move through their environment- sunlight and shadows hitting their winged bodies in flight, ripples in water as ducks float through still marshes, traces of a whole flock of birds dotting the horizon.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

H. Emerson Tuttle (1890-1946), devoted much of his career to drawing and etching prints of birds, both from life, and using stuffed specimens in his studio. Arresting and commanding, his prints take on the appearance of formal seated portraits. Intricate detail is given to the patterns of feathers, the cock of the head, and oftentimes, the direct gaze of the bird. Tuttle’s prints are unswerving and full of personality- his birds take center stage and are only sometimes supported by a background. Tuttle captures their beauty and dynamism with his drypoint needle, imbuing his birds with almost human-like dispositions.

In contrast, Stow Wengenroth (1906-1978) is known for his landscapes, so his birds appear in their expected and rightful place, perched in mottled tree branches, exploring sand dunes, and in flight, weaving among shadows of trees. Birds play a principal part of his New England landscapes, adding movement and breathing life into his lithographic sceneries.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

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Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Prints, Sporting

Frank Benson on Light

The Guide. Frank W. Benson. Drypoint, 1920. Edition 150. Image size 6 7/8 x 10 7/8

The Guide. Frank W. Benson. Drypoint, 1920. Edition 150. Image size 6 7/8 x 10 7/8″ (173 x 273 mm). LINK.

“I follow the light, where it comes from, where it goes.” -Frank W. Benson (1862-1951)

Supper. Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1920. Edition 150. One known state. Image size 6 13/16 x 5 7/8

Supper. Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1920. Edition 150. One known state. Image size 6 13/16 x 5 7/8″ (173 x 124 mm). LINK.

Deer Hunter. Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1924. Edition 150. Image size  7 7/8 x 10 7/8

Deer Hunter. Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1924. Edition 150. Image size 7 7/8 x 10 7/8″ (200 x 278 mm). LINK.

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19th Century Prints, Chromolithograph, Lithograph, New Additions, Prints, Sporting

New Additions: Fishing Flies

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSMary Orvis Marbury’s “Favorite Flies and Their Histories”  became a best seller among anglers after it first appeared in 1892 and went through nine printings by 1896. The 32 prints in this unique book are done in stunning chromolithography, as achieved by M. Bradley Co. Lith.

Mary Orvis Marbury was daughter to Charles Orvis, founder of Orvis, the fishing, hunting, and sporting good store dynasty based in Manchester, Vermont. Mary ran the company’s fly fishing department and was inspired to write the book when she realized how little standardization there was among fly patterns. For each fly illustrated in the book, there is a description or story regarding the creation, design, or naming of the particular fly. In many cases, these descriptions are just as colorful and engaging as the illustrations. They were compiled by Maybury from conversations with regional anglers, letters amassed over time with far away fishermen, and from customers that frequented her family’s famous fishing shop.

One example, from “Bass Flies, Plate X” (pictured below):

“No.240. The Cleveland. There was once a jolly club of three, who styled themselves the “Texas Club,” saying that “their membership consisted of President, Secretary, and Treasurer.” The club was a fishing-club, and met summers to rejoice in being together and in fishing “galore.” The Secretary and Treasurer were rivals always; their joys would have been incomplete without the never-ceasing spirit of contest. What one had the other had, too, if money or skill could procure it, be it a big fish or a new hat. The Cheney fly was made and named in honor of the Secretary. A little later, the maker of the Cheney fly mas a fly with a gallina wing and red and black body, somewhat similar to Dr. Henshall’s Polka, and to it was given the title Cleveland after the Treasurer. But alas for human hopes! One day the maker of these flies met the Treasurer, and this conversation ensued:

Treasurer: I have wanted to meet you for a long time. I have a questions to ask you. Now, honestly, don’t you think you put just a little more color into the Cheney fly than you did the Cleveland? Now answer me frankly.

Maker: I did not intend to do so, I assure you.

Treasurer: Well, but I think you did. Couldn’t it be dressed up a trifle, some way?

Maker: I am glad you spoke to me about it. I shall be pleased to try again, and to make a fly more worthy of the name.

Treasurer: Yes, do; and mind you put a little more gilt on it than is on Cheney’s.

This new Cleveland fly is an earnest endeavor to construct a fly in the embodiment of strength, modesty, brilliancy, and other sterling merits, traits that win and hold the friends of Mr. William D. Cleveland outside as well as within the Texas Club.”

We hope you enjoy these new additions to our sporting and fishing section. As always, the prints can be viewed online as well as in our Georgetown DC gallery.

Bass Flies. Plate X. Cleveland, Cheney, Chippy, Dark Flaggon, Croppie, Barnwell.  From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate X. Cleveland, Cheney, Chippy, Dark Flaggon, Croppie, Barnwell. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate BB. Marston, Manchester, Horicon, Lake George, Max Von Dem Borne, Munro. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate BB. Marston, Manchester, Horicon, Lake George, Max Von Dem Borne, Munro. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate J. Oquossoc, Klamath, no name, New Lake, Tomah Jo., Prince Island. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate J. Oquossoc, Klamath, no name, New Lake, Tomah Jo., Prince Island. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate Z. Golden Dustman; Henshall; Knight Templar; Jungle Cock; Holberton; Holberton II. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate Z. Golden Dustman; Henshall; Knight Templar; Jungle Cock; Holberton; Holberton II. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate K. Silver Doctor, H.P. Wells Pattern; Silver Doctor J. G. Shearer's Pattern; Silver Doctor, C. F. Orvis's Pattern; Spider; Seth Green; Silver Ibis. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate K. Silver Doctor, H.P. Wells Pattern; Silver Doctor J. G. Shearer’s Pattern; Silver Doctor, C. F. Orvis’s Pattern; Spider; Seth Green; Silver Ibis. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate F. Green Weaver; Golden Pheasant; Gray Duke; Firey Brown; Grackle; Grasshopper. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16 inches. LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate F. Green Weaver; Golden Pheasant; Gray Duke; Firey Brown; Grackle; Grasshopper. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16 inches. LINK.

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, Abstract, American Maps, Americana, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Foreign Maps, Foreign Views, Gallery Updates, Maps, Natural History, OPG Showcase, Prints, Sporting, World Maps

October 2013 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new October 2013 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The catalog features a wide range of prints and maps- striking portraits of American revolutionary heroes, important early maps and views of the Americas and Holy Land, traditional fall hunting scenes, and a sampling of contemporary and early 20th century prints from our two most recent shows, PER-FORM and Alessandro Mastro-Valerio: A Retrospective.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, just in time for the holidays. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the October Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. October 2013. CLICK TO READ!

The Old Print Gallery Showcase.
October 2013.
CLICK TO READ!

We hope you enjoy it!

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19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Pencil Drawing, Photo engraving, Prints, Sporting, Watercolor, Wood, Woodcut

Print Round-Up: Bicycles

From the earliest depictions of penny farthings and velocipedes on dirt lanes, to modern-day prints of bike commuters navigating busy city streets, our prints celebrate and illustrate the convenience, athleticism, and joy of cycling.  Some of our historic prints show the bicycle in its earliest stages of development- with over-sized front wheels, or still lacking pedals or gears. They also highlight the beginnings of a strong “bike culture” in the 19th century. Many took to this popular form of transportation and amusement, going on long afternoon group rides or joining cycling clubs. We also have several great racing prints, showing fans at the velodrome, watching racers sprint around and around. Contemporary artists like Art Werger, Susan Pyzow, and Su-Li Hung have also depicted cyclists in their prints.

We hope you enjoy our bike print round-up, and we invite you to visit our Washington DC and New York City galleries to view these prints in person!

Tourists. By A. B. Frost. Published by Harper's Weekly. Photoengraving, hand colored, 1896. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2" (215 x 317 mm). AT OPG.

Tourists. By A. B. Frost. Published by Harper’s Weekly. Photoengraving, hand colored, 1896. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2″ (215 x 317 mm). AT OPG.

Six-Day Bike Race. BY Joseph W. Golinkin. Watercolor, c.1940. Image size 20 x 24" (508 x 610 mm). AT OPS.

Six-Day Bike Race. By Joseph W. Golinkin. Watercolor, c.1940. Image size 20 x 24″ (508 x 610 mm). AT OPS.

Bicyclist. By Susan Pyzow.  Etching, 2002. Image size 9 x 11 7/8" (225 x 300 mm). Edition 40. AT OPG.

Bicyclist. By Susan Pyzow. Etching, 2002. Image size 9 x 11 7/8″ (225 x 300 mm). Edition 40. AT OPG.

Cyclist Duo. By Richard Sloat. Etching, 2003. Image size 6 x 9 1/2" (152 x 240 mm). Edition 7. AT OPS.

Cyclist Duo. By Richard Sloat. Etching, 2003. Image size 6 x 9 1/2″ (152 x 240 mm). Edition 7. AT OPS.

Bike Lane, Queensborough Bridge. By Steven E. Walker. Woodcut, 2005. Image size 9 9/16 x 7 1/8" (243 x 180 mm). Edition 75. AT OPG.

Bike Lane, Queensborough Bridge. By Steven E. Walker. Woodcut, 2005. Image size 9 9/16 x 7 1/8″ (243 x 180 mm). Edition 75. AT OPG.

A Velocipede of Fifty Years Ago. Published in Harper's Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, 1869. Image size 4 3/16 x 5 3/4" (105 x 146 mm). AT OPS.

A Velocipede of Fifty Years Ago. Published in Harper’s Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, 1869. Image size 4 3/16 x 5 3/4″ (105 x 146 mm). AT OPS.

Bicycle in America.  The Germantown Bicycle Club starting out for a Race. By W. P. Snyder. Published in Harper's Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, Feb. 7, 1880.  Image size 6 5/8 x 9 1/8" (168 x 231 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycle in America. The Germantown Bicycle Club starting out for a Race. By W. P. Snyder. Published in Harper’s Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, Feb. 7, 1880. Image size 6 5/8 x 9 1/8″ (168 x 231 mm). AT OPG.

A Tour Awheel. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper's Weekly. Photogravure, 1899. Image size 6 1/2 x 8 3/8" (164 x 211 mm). AT OPS.

A Tour Awheel. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper’s Weekly. Photogravure, 1899. Image size 6 1/2 x 8 3/8″ (164 x 211 mm). AT OPS.

Figure Study, Woman on Bicycle. By Martin Lewis. Pencil on paper, c.1935. Image size 7 x 3 1/8" (178 x 80 mm). AT OPS.

Figure Study, Woman on Bicycle. By Martin Lewis. Pencil on paper, c.1935. Image size 7 x 3 1/8″ (178 x 80 mm). AT OPS.

Bicycle. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 2007. Image size 11 3/4 x 12 1/4" (298 x 315 mm). Edition 50. AT OPS.

Bicycle. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 2007. Image size 11 3/4 x 12 1/4″ (298 x 315 mm). Edition 50. AT OPS.

Wheeling on Riverside Drive. BY T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, July 17, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8" (343 x 556 mm.) AT OPG.

Wheeling on Riverside Drive. By T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, July 17, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8″ (343 x 556 mm.) AT OPG.

The Velodrome de la Seine: The Grand-stand. By Georges Scott. Wood engraving, c.1880. Image size 12 1/4 x 19 5/8" (310 x 499 mm.) AT OPG.

The Velodrome de la Seine: The Grand-stand. By Georges Scott. Wood engraving, c.1880. Image size 12 1/4 x 19 5/8″ (310 x 499 mm.) AT OPG.

The Century Run. By Jay Hambidge. Published by Truth Company. Color photoengraving, 1897. Image size 11 x 17 7/8" (273 x 455 mm.). AT OPG.

The Century Run. By Jay Hambidge. Published by Truth Company. Color photoengraving, 1897. Image size 11 x 17 7/8″ (273 x 455 mm.). AT OPG.

Cycling in England - Down the Ripley Road. By Joseph Pennell. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York, Oct. 22, 1887. Wood engraving, hand colored, 1887. Image size  9 1/4 x 12 5/8" (236 x 325 mm). AT OPG.

Cycling in England – Down the Ripley Road. By Joseph Pennell. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York, Oct. 22, 1887. Wood engraving, hand colored, 1887. Image size 9 1/4 x 12 5/8″ (236 x 325 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycling on Riverside Drive, New York. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Photoengraving, hand colored, c. 1895. Image size 8 1/2 x 13 1/4" (214 x 339 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycling on Riverside Drive, New York. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Photoengraving, hand colored, c. 1895. Image size 8 1/2 x 13 1/4″ (214 x 339 mm). AT OPG.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Image size 13 1/8 x 9 3/16" (333 x 245 mm). Ed 25. AT OPG.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Image size 13 1/8 x 9 3/16″ (333 x 245 mm). Ed 25. AT OPG.

AT OPG= Print is located at The Old Print Gallery, 1220 31st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007. www.oldprintgallery.com  t: 202-965-1818

AT OPS= Print is located at The Old Print Shop, 150 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY, 10016. www.oldprintshop.com  t:212-683-3950

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