Aquatint, Color etching, Etching, Multi-plate etching, Prints

Chaim Koppelman on Printmaking

Figure at Table.  Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1946. Edition 30. LINK.

Figure at Table. Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1946. Edition 30. LINK.

“Printmaking has the prerequisites for exact criticism. It is incisive, neat, doesn’t spill over, makes its point graphically. Like all people, I am critical; because I hope to be beautifully so, I am a printmaker. For me, printmaking honors, because it criticizes, a world that is vague, vapid, gray, indecisive, boring, wandering, wavering, hovering, in-between, hiding, teasing, fence-sitting, dim, paradoxical, political, fuzzy, shifting, shiftless, infinite, two-faced, uncommitted. Such a world is our very selves. The print is a trumpet call for definition, conviction, taking a stand. When I take the etching needle in my hand the shifting becomes fixed, the in-between definite, the dim clear, the hidden seen, the teasing full-throated. ” – Chaim Koppelman

By the Skin of Our Teeth. Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

By the Skin of Our Teeth. Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

In the Workshop. By Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1966. Edition 25. LINK.

In the Workshop. By Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1966. Edition 25. LINK.

On Meeting Beauty II. Chaim Koppelman. Aquatint, 1958. Edition 200. A/P. LINK.

On Meeting Beauty II. Chaim Koppelman. Aquatint, 1958. Edition 200. A/P. LINK.

The Subway. Chaim Koppelman. Soft ground etching, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

The Subway. Chaim Koppelman. Soft ground etching, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

Sad Figure. Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1956. Edition 50. LINK.

Sad Figure. Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1956. Edition 50. LINK.

Crazy Steer. Chaim Koppelman. Two plate color etching and aquatint, 1965. Edition 30. LINK.

Crazy Steer. Chaim Koppelman. Two plate color etching and aquatint, 1965. Edition 30. LINK.

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18th Century Prints, Aquatint, Color etching, Contemporary, Copperplate, Engraving, Etching, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Palaces

past present logo copyToday we are sharing two architecture prints. The oldest is from one of the finest architectural works of the German baroque period, Paul Decker’s Fürstliche Baumeister, oder Architectura Civilis. The work was published in Augsburg, Germany by Peter Detleffsen in 1711, and featured plates engraved by several master engravers of the time, including Bodenehr, Englebrecht, Probst and Kraus. They illustrate Decker’s designs for royal palaces and country houses, with details of their interior decoration, gateways, and gardens. In contrast to other architectural texts from the same period which focused heavily on theory and history, none of Decker’s plates were accompanied with text or elaborate descriptions. Rather, his work in Fürstliche Baumeister was created solely with the aristocratic architectural patrons of Central Europe in mind, in hopes to influence and inspire them while they built their palaces and grand estates.

The contemporary print is by Linda Adato, a master of color intaglio. The subject matter of her prints varies from the architecture of New York City, to the chambers and ancient ruins of Europe, to her own backyard. She “enjoy[s] exploring the geometry of the structures in these images and capturing the light at a certain moment or time of day,” always drawing attention to the balance between light and dark, hidden and seen. Adato’s work is distinctive for its delicate synthesis of composition, subtle use of color, and classical elegance. She has been making color etchings for over twenty-five years and is exceptionally skilled at “a la poupee”,  a one plate method of color printing where the colors are inked and wiped on the plate prior to printing.

Image on Top: Erste Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker. Copper engraving, 1711-1716. Published by Peter Detleffsen. Image size 14 3/4 x 14 7/8″. LINK.

Image on Bottom: The Palace. By Linda Adato. Color etching with aquatint and soft ground, 1993. Edition 19/75. Image size 23 3/4 x 15 3/4″. LINK. 

Erste   Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker.

Erste Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker. LINK.

The Palace. By Linda Adato. LINK.

The Palace. By Linda Adato. LINK.

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Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Linocut, Lithograph, Offset Lithograph, Prints, Woodcut

PER∙FORM to open in July

On the High Wire.  [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010.

On the High Wire. [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010.

PER∙FORM

We are very happy to announce our upcoming summer show, PER∙FORM, which opens on Friday, July 19, 2013. As always, there will be a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-8pm on that opening Friday. The show will stay up on the gallery walls until September 14, 2013.

PER∙FORM celebrates depictions of dancers, musicians, circus performers, and stars of the stage, and pulls from our inventory of both early 20th century and contemporary prints. Ranging from abstract to figurative, these compositions are ambitious and inventive in their attempt to capture sound, forms in movement, and the indefinable energy- both physical and emotional- that fuels and motivates performers.

Vibrato II. By Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006.

Vibrato II. By Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006.

Highlights include Stanley Kaplan’s Vibrato II, which uses multiple, repeated cuts into a linoleum matrix to mimic the quiver of its musical title and an original offset lithograph, circa 1938, that announces the arrival of Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey circus performers to 5th and Florida Avenue in Washington, DC. Another showstopper is Robert Riggs’ Drum Major. Completed in charcoal and red crayon, Riggs uses deft and simple line work to conjure up a musician who has given his whole body over to the performance- back arched and foot in mid stomp.

Untitled. [Drum Major]. By Robert Riggs. Charcoal & red crayon, c.1930.

Untitled. [Drum Major]. By Robert Riggs. Charcoal & red crayon, c.1930.

Several prints offer more intimate compositions- dancers hovering in the wings of a theater, a reserved and focused duo practicing for a recital. These serve as a nice contrast to scenes of rigorous athleticism and dramatic lighting mixing on center stage.  As such, this collection of prints not only showcases the spirit and emotive vitality of performers, but also draws attention to the diverse venues in which these performers execute their talent. Scenes are set under striped circus tents and red-curtained stages, as well as on subway platforms and city streets- proving that these printmakers were inspired by acts of performance both  practiced and spontaneous.

You said you had a Story?  (Sweet Smell of Success.). By Maya Hardin. Softground, 2002.

You said you had a Story? (Sweet Smell of Success.) By Maya Hardin. Softground, 2002.

Subway Dance. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color, finished by hand, 2007.

Subway Dance. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color, finished by hand, 2007.

Selected Artists: Abe Blashko, Central PTG and Illinois Co., Robert Cook, Joseph Essig, Eugene C. Fitsch, Thomas Handforth, Maya Hardin, Stanley Kaplan, Dorie Marder, Doel Reed, Robert Riggs, Arnold Ronnebeck, John Ross, Andree Ruellan, Georges Schreiber, Thomas Seawell, Ellen Nathan Singer, John Sloan, Sam Swerdloff, and Bruce Waldman.

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey. Published by Central PTG. and Illinois. Co., Chicago, U.S.A. Offset lithograph, c. 1938.

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey. Published by Central PTG. and Illinois. Co., Chicago, U.S.A. Offset lithograph, c. 1938.

PER∙FORM on the OPG Website: click here.

PER∙FORM Press Release: click here.

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19th Century Prints, Chromolithograph, Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Lithograph, Prints, Sporting, Wood

Yachting Prints

Below are several yachting prints we currently have in active inventory. While the invention of sailing is prehistoric, the racing of sailing boats is believed to have started in the 17th century Netherlands.  Custom-built yachting boats became very popular in England in the 19th century, and helped to increase the popularity of the sport. For years,  brilliant displays of yacht racing, like famous match-races such as The America’s Cup, have been a source of inspiration to artists. We hope you enjoy this quick round-up of prints. We have many more nautical and yachting prints in our Georgetown gallery- so we invite our readers to stop by and see these striking and beautiful prints in person.

To the Commodore & Members of the New-York Yacht Club, this Print of the YACHT AMERICA (Modelled & Built by Geo. Steers, Esq. Of New-York,) is respectfully dedicated.  Published by Brown & Severin, New York. Two-stone lithograph, 1851.

To the Commodore & Members of the New-York Yacht Club, this Print of the YACHT AMERICA (Modelled & Built by Geo. Steers, Esq. Of New-York,) is respectfully dedicated. Published by Brown & Severin, New York. Two-stone lithograph, 1851.

In Down East Waters  Boston Bay. By Fred S. Cozzens. Published by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. Chromolithograph, 1884.

In Down East Waters Boston Bay. By Fred S. Cozzens. Published by Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York. Chromolithograph, 1884.

Yachts and Barges. By George C. Wales. Soft ground, 1920.

Yachts and Barges. By George C. Wales. Soft ground, 1920.

Nina, 1928. By George C. Wales. Lithograph, 1929.

Nina, 1928. By George C. Wales. Lithograph, 1929.

The Cutter Genesta, R.Y.S. By Charles Parsons. Published by Currier & Ives 115 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph printed in color, 1885.

The Cutter Genesta, R.Y.S. By Charles Parsons. Published by Currier & Ives 115 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph printed in color, 1885.

The Yacht "Sappho" of New York. By Charles Parsons. Published by Currier & Ives, 115 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, handcolored, 1869.

The Yacht “Sappho” of New York. By Charles Parsons. Published by Currier & Ives, 115 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, handcolored, 1869.

A Fine Day in Autumn - Miniature Yachting. Published in The Daily Graphic, New York. Wood engraving, hand colored, Nov. 13, 1879.

A Fine Day in Autumn – Miniature Yachting. Published in The Daily Graphic, New York. Wood engraving, hand colored, Nov. 13, 1879.

 

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Mezzotint, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Central Park

past present logo copy

Our new Past/Present post  features  two prints of Central Park by Emil Ganso and Art Werger. Born in Germany in 1895, Emil Ganso was an accomplished painter, wood engraver, and lithographer, specializing in still-lifes, landscapes and nudes. Largely self-taught, Ganso immigrated to the United States in 1912. He first worked as a baker, while pursuing his art on the side. He started showing his work by the mid-1920’s and by 1925, Weyhe Gallery began to represent Ganso which gave him the funds to spend his first summer in the art colony of Woodstock, New York in 1926. He settled in Woodstock the following year, benefiting greatly from the artistic company of George Ault, Doris Lee, Charles Rosen, and George Bellows.   In the late 1920s and 1930s, Ganso also kept a studio at 54 West 74th Street, an artists’ building where Walter Pach and Theresa Bernstein had studios. This NYC studio was located just one block away from the west side of Central Park.

Art Werger grew up in the suburbs of New York where he developed a passion for drawing at an early age. After studying illustration and painting at the Rhode Island School of Design, he switched into the field of printmaking. Over the last thirty years, he has focused on etching, aquatint, and mezzotint, and has become an internationally renowned artist in those media- having received over 250 awards in national and international exhibitions. In 2012, he received the Award of the Rector at the International Print Triennial in Krakow, Poland and the Prize for Full Correspondence between Technique and Imagery at the First International Mezzotint Festival in Ekaterinburg, Russia.  Werger, although known for his narrative and lyrical prints based on his  suburban upbringing, has a series of cityscapes, with New York City as his inspiration. Intrigued by the interplay between city lights and cast shadows, Werger creates velvety rich prints of the day-to-day moments that play out in the city, including several of Central Park.

Image on Left: Pine Trees.  (Trees, Central Park).  Emil Ganso. Hard and soft ground etching, 1929.  Edition c.35.

Image on Right: Follow.  [Central Park, New York.] Art Werger. Mezzotint, 2005.  Edition 100.

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