Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

ETCHED

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.  (Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.
(Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

We are very excited to announce ETCHED, our upcoming OPG show of early 20th century and contemporary original etchings, which will open Friday, February 21, 2014. The gallery will host a nighttime reception that Friday, from 5-8pm, which is open and free to the public. The show will remain on view at the gallery until April 5, 2014, during normal gallery hours.

Etching as a form of printmaking evolved from metal workshops of the Middle Ages, where swords, armor, and tools were all etched with acid to produce intricate line and scroll work. Daniel Hopfer, a 16th century craftsman, applied these metalworking techniques to iron printmaking plates, and was the first to use etching as a form of printmaking. Many artists were soon lured by etching’s capacity to capture the essence and spontaneity of the artist’s hand in printed form.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

ETCHED will celebrate the long legacy of printmakers who specialize in and focus on etching as a way of image making. As the show pulls from over a century of creative expression, viewers will be fascinated by the myriad of ways an artist can use an etched line to create tone, atmosphere, and detail. The show also highlights new technical advances in etching, including multi-plate color etchings and experimental solar plate etchings.

Highlights include meticulously etched architectural views by John Taylor Arms, two direct and intimate portraits by Isabel Bishop and Nicholas Vagenas, and  velvety and dense lines found in works by Peter Milton and Otto Kuhler.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Selected Artists: Sigmund Abeles, John Taylor Arms, Frank W. Benson, Robert Birmelin, Isabel Bishop, Richard Carleton, Arthur Cohen, Robert Cook, Joseph Essig, Takuji Kubo, Otto Kuhler, Yvette Lucas, Charles F. Mielatz, Peter Milton, Ellen Nathan Singer, Joseph Pennell, Susan Pyzow, Nicholas Vagenas, Hank Virgona, Bruce Waldman.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints, Watercolor

RED show

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

We are very excited to announce our early spring show, RED, which will open with a nighttime reception on February 15, 2013.  RED is a group show of contemporary and early 20th century printmakers who feature the emboldened and passionate hue of red in their prints. Red is the color of blood, fire, earthen clay and blushing petals, and as such, has strong symbolic connections to life and vitality. The selected artists use this energizing pigment to excite the eye and engage viewers- drawing them into their dynamic compositions.

Highlights include a monotype, Fast Forward, by Washington, DC artist Rosemary Cooley, whose concentrated red tones pulsate beneath more delicate looping white and blue strokes. Similarly, red weaves its way along limbs, eyes, and biomorphic shapes in Cantos y Voces and outlines two faces in Black & White, both by Karima Muyaes. Here, red symbolizes blood-ties and familial relationships, linking disparate visages together into a cohesive whole.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Red also is used by artists in representations of our natural world. It shows up in the rust-colored canyons of John Ross’s collagraphs, in the flushed petals of Clare Romano’s Mallorcan Flower and Nina Muys’ Hibiscus, and in the ominous and bruised red and purple sky of Frederick Mershimer’s Eye of the Storm.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

The show will be on view until April 13, 2013. We encourage all our blog readers and gallery followers to attend the RED opening reception and show, to see these beautiful and striking prints in person.

Selected Artists: Will Barnet, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Robert Birmelin, Rosemary Cooley, Antonio Frasconi, Susan Goldman, Mary Manusos, Tokoha Matsuda, Heather McMordie, Judy Mensch, Frederick Mershimer, Karima Muyaes, Nina Muys, Michael Pellettieri, Matt Phillips, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Clare Romano, John Ross, and Hank Virgona.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

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Contemporary, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints

Winter Contemporary Show: Artist Statements

Our 2012 Winter Contemporary Show opens tonight– with a celebratory opening night party from 5-8pm at OPG (its free- so stop by and bring all of your friends!). We selected work by 22 different artists- hailing from all over the map- DC,  New York,  Ohio, even Japan. Below is a sneak preview of the show’s collection. I’ve also included excerpts from the printmakers’ artists statements. Although many of these works speak for themselves, it is always interesting to read how an artist conceptualizes his/her own work- what inspires, what processes they use, and so on. Enjoy!

Bruce Waldman- “I think of my work as dealing much more with the turbulence of my emotions than about technique, process, or any intellectual method or idea. I use the techniques that I have learned as tools only. Whether I am doing a figure, a landscape or still-life, I am viewing from inside my body; and usually the image is speaking more about my feelings than about the objects I’m depicting.”

Linda Adato- I start the image abstractly from the geometries of things around me, their configuration of line, form, shadow, etc. In the journey from drawing to final print, I do not so much execute the initial idea as I develop it in the course of the intaglio process. I am sometimes surprised by the “realistic” image.”

Takumune Ishiguro-To draw a picture is to express myself. The motif of my work comes from ‘Nature’ – vitality created from nature, hue, shape, air, smell, etc. It is not the motif created systematically, but the motif created naturally that is put on my canvas, not directly but through the filter of ‘myself’.  Etching has many attractive expressions such as lines or areas caused by corrosion and unplanned occurrences.  A completed work is a mirror of myself.

Masaaki Noda- I like to express the inner and outer worlds of nature for pictorial dynamism. They radiate energy and originate either from the tellurian or the celestial world: perpetual motion which embraces abstraction through the potential and momentum of its intrinsic energy of nature. 

Alan Petrulis-  “Technique has never been more than a means to an end for me. I have no compulsion to follow rules, show off my expertise, or do something new for its own sake. Having worked in many mediums both new and old I feel most comfortable creating simple line etchings by a method that has changed little over the past four hundred years. “

Richard Sloat– Woodcut and etching have been my field of creation. Both these forms of prints exude a visual clarity and depth of feeling. We, in viewing them, are tied into the visual world at an essential level, an affirmation of our own life’s journey.”

Robert Birmelin-  “It is not unusual to find that a relative or friend’s memory of a past event clashes with one’s own. Indeed, how often do two witnesses to the same crime contradict one another as to what really occurred? As an artist, I found myself seeking a visual structure that would be an active metaphor for such a state of mind – a structure continuous and spatially rich that initially seems to offer an uncomplicated, expected orientation and then self subverts, challenging the observer to recognize the claims of another equally visually insistent counter-reading. Our minds are restless, making choices, fluctuating between possibilities as we strive to interpret, to judge between contending truths. These paintings live in mid-thought, in the space of that uncertainty – an all too familiar space in a world of bewildering choice.”

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Aquatint, Contemporary, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Prints

2012 Winter Contemporary Show

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce our Winter Contemporary Show, which will open on January 27, 2012 and run until March 10, 2012. Over twenty different artists, who use printmaking as their primary medium for artistic expression, were selected for this show.

Highlights include prints by Robert Birmelin, whose prints mimic the fleeting shifts of focus and discord as past memories and current visual stimuli fight wrestle for attention and acknowledgment in the mind. Also included are works by Gerald Scheck, whose monochromatic prints feature uninhabited scenes so haunting and luminescent that they evoke a sense of otherworldliness. Prints by NY artist Takamune Ishiguro also excel, with fragmented and corroded lines sensuously folded into restorative sections of light and brilliance. The prints chosen for the show resonate with skill and intention, and reflect the current eclecticism of contemporary printmaking.

The exhibit will open with a nighttime reception on Friday, January 27, from 5-8pm at the Old Print Gallery, located in the heart of Georgetown. Free wine and light refreshments will be served, and the event is open to all ages.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, William H. Behnken, Robert Birmelin, Michael DiCerbo, Lisa Dinhofer, Jenny Freestone, Red Grooms, Takamune Ishiguro, Stanley Kaplan, Robert Kipniss, Masaaki Noda, Alan Petrulis, Matt Phillips, Gerald Scheck, Nikolas Schiller, Ellen Nathan Singer, Richard Sloat,  Emily Trueblood, Bruce Waldman, Steven E. Walker, Art Werger, and Karen Whitman.

For more information, please visit our website here. Also, check back soon for individual posts about the featured artists.

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