Our Mixed Winter Show is now on view at The Old Print Gallery. Stop by our Georgetown shop to see these stunning original 20th century and contemporary prints.Mixed Winter Show

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Openings, Prints

On View Now…

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Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Prints

Peggy Bacon on Effort

Hard of Hearing. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1933. Image size 7 1/2 x 10 7/8" (191 x 277 mm). LINK.

Hard of Hearing. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1933. Image size 7 1/2 x 10 7/8″ (191 x 277 mm). LINK.

“Process work doesn’t appeal to me. That’s why I like drypoint and not just an etching. I’ve done only twenty-five bitten etchings in my life because I don’t care for all that business that goes on that gets between you and the work. I love drypoint and I think that actually it gives you the same wonderful satisfaction that carving in stone must give to a person. You’re really making something with great effort. And I think that effort is very important in the production of any work of art. If it’s too easy, if you’re just gliding around on a wax surface and then biting it in acid, it doesn’t give you that sensation of making something … That wonderful feeling that you have for the material and the real strength that you have to employ to get the line the right depth and richness and to do the cross-hatching so that the metal doesn’t break down but still you get a rich black. It gives you, oh, a great sensation.”- Peggy Bacon

Quote from: Oral history interview with Peggy Bacon, 1973 May 8, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. LINK.

The Soul of the Thrift. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1941. Image size 9 7/8 x 7 inches. LINK.

The Soul of the Thrift. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1941. Image size 9 7/8 x 7 inches. LINK.

Peanuts. Peggy Bacon. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 10 1/4 x 13 inches. LINK.

Peanuts. Peggy Bacon. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 10 1/4 x 13 inches. LINK.

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Aquatint, Color etching, Etching, Multi-plate etching, Prints

Chaim Koppelman on Printmaking

Figure at Table.  Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1946. Edition 30. LINK.

Figure at Table. Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1946. Edition 30. LINK.

“Printmaking has the prerequisites for exact criticism. It is incisive, neat, doesn’t spill over, makes its point graphically. Like all people, I am critical; because I hope to be beautifully so, I am a printmaker. For me, printmaking honors, because it criticizes, a world that is vague, vapid, gray, indecisive, boring, wandering, wavering, hovering, in-between, hiding, teasing, fence-sitting, dim, paradoxical, political, fuzzy, shifting, shiftless, infinite, two-faced, uncommitted. Such a world is our very selves. The print is a trumpet call for definition, conviction, taking a stand. When I take the etching needle in my hand the shifting becomes fixed, the in-between definite, the dim clear, the hidden seen, the teasing full-throated. ” – Chaim Koppelman

By the Skin of Our Teeth. Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

By the Skin of Our Teeth. Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

In the Workshop. By Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1966. Edition 25. LINK.

In the Workshop. By Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1966. Edition 25. LINK.

On Meeting Beauty II. Chaim Koppelman. Aquatint, 1958. Edition 200. A/P. LINK.

On Meeting Beauty II. Chaim Koppelman. Aquatint, 1958. Edition 200. A/P. LINK.

The Subway. Chaim Koppelman. Soft ground etching, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

The Subway. Chaim Koppelman. Soft ground etching, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

Sad Figure. Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1956. Edition 50. LINK.

Sad Figure. Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1956. Edition 50. LINK.

Crazy Steer. Chaim Koppelman. Two plate color etching and aquatint, 1965. Edition 30. LINK.

Crazy Steer. Chaim Koppelman. Two plate color etching and aquatint, 1965. Edition 30. LINK.

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