Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Prints

Peggy Bacon on Effort

Hard of Hearing. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1933. Image size 7 1/2 x 10 7/8" (191 x 277 mm). LINK.

Hard of Hearing. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1933. Image size 7 1/2 x 10 7/8″ (191 x 277 mm). LINK.

“Process work doesn’t appeal to me. That’s why I like drypoint and not just an etching. I’ve done only twenty-five bitten etchings in my life because I don’t care for all that business that goes on that gets between you and the work. I love drypoint and I think that actually it gives you the same wonderful satisfaction that carving in stone must give to a person. You’re really making something with great effort. And I think that effort is very important in the production of any work of art. If it’s too easy, if you’re just gliding around on a wax surface and then biting it in acid, it doesn’t give you that sensation of making something … That wonderful feeling that you have for the material and the real strength that you have to employ to get the line the right depth and richness and to do the cross-hatching so that the metal doesn’t break down but still you get a rich black. It gives you, oh, a great sensation.”- Peggy Bacon

Quote from: Oral history interview with Peggy Bacon, 1973 May 8, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. LINK.

The Soul of the Thrift. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1941. Image size 9 7/8 x 7 inches. LINK.

The Soul of the Thrift. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1941. Image size 9 7/8 x 7 inches. LINK.

Peanuts. Peggy Bacon. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 10 1/4 x 13 inches. LINK.

Peanuts. Peggy Bacon. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 10 1/4 x 13 inches. LINK.

Standard
Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Prints, Serigraph

Will Barnet on Theory

Ariadne. By Will Barnet. Published by Styria Studio, Inc., New York and Will Barnet. Color serigraph. 1980. Image size 17 3/4 x 15" (450 x 378 mm). Edition 150. Inscribed "54/150." LINK.

Ariadne. By Will Barnet. Published by Styria Studio, Inc., New York and Will Barnet. Color serigraph. 1980. Image size 17 3/4 x 15″ (450 x 378 mm). Edition 150. Inscribed “54/150.” LINK.

“The crux of my art is that I believe in theory and aesthetics as the base for any artist’s development. To me no artist can develop without theory… Theory and ideas are absolutely essential, and you need culture. It is nice to be emotional and I think I am emotional enough as it is, but you need control and a depth of experience in what painting is all about… I think only by studying the past will you know what today should be like. That’s my belief anyway.”- Will Barnet

Quote from: Oral history interview with Will Barnet, 1968 January 15, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. LINK.

Standard
Early 20th Century, Figurative, Lithograph, Prints

Marion Greenwood on Painting What You Love

Untitled. [Young Girls]. Marion Greenwood. Lithograph, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8 inches. LINK.

Untitled. [Young Girls]. Marion Greenwood. Lithograph, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 10 1/8 x 11 7/8 inches. LINK.

“It was the time when surrealism and all kinds of -isms were in the air, and I remember how I finally decided the only thing to do is to be yourself. One thing I always had was a terrific love for human beings and people, and so I just painted with that thought in mind and immediately became quite successful with my easel work.”- Marion Greenwood

Quote from Oral history interview with Marion Greenwood, 1964 Jan. 31, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. LINK.

Standard
Drawing, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Prints, Sporting

Abe Blashko on Point of View

Market Vendors. Abe Blashko. Lithograph, 1940. Edition 53. Image size 19 3/4 x 12 3/8" (500 x 315 mm). LINK.

Market Vendors. Abe Blashko. Lithograph, 1940. Edition 53. Image size 19 3/4 x 12 3/8″ (500 x 315 mm). LINK.

“The turbulent social and political events of the 1930s were major contributors to my early development of a point of view. I was able to feel the pulse of that period and was fascinated with the faces and activities of the people around me, a fascination with their work, play, determination, strength, greed and evil.” Abe Blashko

Market. Abe Blashko. Graphite drawing with chalk highlights, 1937. Image size 13 1/2 x 20 3/4" (343 x 528 mm). LINK.

Market. Abe Blashko. Graphite drawing with chalk highlights, 1937.
Image size 13 1/2 x 20 3/4″ (343 x 528 mm). LINK.

The Pencil Vendor. Abe Blashko. Graphite drawing, 1937. Image size 22 3/4 x 13 3/8" (526 x 304 mm). LINK.

The Pencil Vendor. Abe Blashko. Graphite drawing, 1937. Image size 22 3/4 x 13 3/8″ (526 x 304 mm). LINK.

Standard
Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Prints

Charles Burchfield on Nature

Summer Benediction. Charles E. Burchfield. Published by The Print Club of Cleveland. Lithograph, 1953. Image size 12 x 9" (304 x 229 mm). Edition 260. Signed in pencil.

Summer Benediction. Charles E. Burchfield. Published by The Print Club of Cleveland. Lithograph, 1953. Image size 12 x 9″ (304 x 229 mm). Edition 260. Signed in pencil.

“Well, I think that if this world lasts for a million years or two million years, or more, that never can you exhaust the subject matter of humanity or nature. It’s simply inexhaustible. I feel abut my own work, for example, my interest is more in nature now than in man-made things; I don’t know how much time I’ve got left, but I’d like to have at least another lifetime like I’ve had to say what I want to say about nature. I just don’t think I can ever get it said. There just isn’t time.”- Charles Burchfield (1893-1967)

We are in the last week of our exhibit Resonant Terrain. Stop by the gallery today or tomorrow to see this show of landscape-themed prints (including this particular Burchfield lithograph) before it comes down.

Quote from Oral history interview with Charles Burchfield, 1959 August 19, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Read the whole interview here.

Standard