Early 20th Century, Etching, Figurative, Portraits, Prints

Opening this Friday…

20th Century People

preview the exhibit

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Aquatint, Charcoal Drawing, Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Drawing, Etching, Figurative, Lithograph, Pencil Drawing, Prints, Watercolor

“20th Century People” to Open in September

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown.  Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8" (257 x 302 mm). LINK.

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown. Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8″. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery’s new fall show, 20th Century People, will open on Friday, September 18th, with an opening reception from 5-7pm. The exhibit is a compendium of “people in prints” by some of the most celebrated 20th century American printmakers. Working and creating in a time when the art world was pushing towards abstract expressionism and modernism, these print artists stayed rooted in a sort of inherent figural humanism. With an exquisite ability to convey emotion through the anatomy of the human figure, the artists used their pencils, woodblocks, and burins to capture an arresting gaze, a fleeting moment between individuals, people at work, at play, and deep in thought. Seen together, these prints offer a glimpse of 20th century America, while also reminding viewers of our shared human condition. The show will remain on view until November 14, 2015.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Selected Artists: Peggy Bacon, Albert W. Barker, Will Barnet, Leonard Baskin, Thomas Hart Benton, Isabel Bishop, Abe Blasko, Ernest Fiene, Emil Ganso, Gordon Grant, Marion Greenwood, Irwin D. Hoffman, Martin Lewis, Charles W. Locke, James Penney, Robert Riggs, John Sloan, Bruce Waldman, Max Weber, and Anders Zorn.

Click HERE to see the prints included in the show. 

Single Strap Hanger. ISabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4". LINK.

Single Strap Hanger. Isabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4″. LINK.

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19th Century Prints, Fashion, Lithograph, Portraits, Prints

Currier and Ives “Girl’s Name” Portraits

Today on the OPG blog we are sharing several of our Currier and Ives prints- the “girl’s name” portraits. Produced in large quantities for public sale, these prints were strictly a commercial venture for the firm. In addition to the 600 portraits of historical figures, presidents, sporting heroes, and drama stars, Currier and Ives published 250 “girl’s name” prints, close to 30 percent of their total portrait output. These name prints were idealized portraits of women and children, titled with popular Christian names of the day. To capitalize on their popularity, the firm would sometimes publish multiple prints under the same name or title- there are thirteen “Mary” prints, five “Josephine” prints, seven “Susan” prints. The lithographs all have slightly different compositions, picturing the girl in a new and elaborate outfit, sitting or standing, facing left or facing right, yellow roses in hair or red roses in hair. Several prints do not have a name at all; rather they are titled with sweet sobriquets like “The American Beauty”, “The Southern Beauty”, “My Sweetheart”, “Pride of the West”, and so on. Today, these sentimental prints are collected for their charming beauty, elaborate costumes, and delightful compositional elements. We hope enjoy them!

Maria. : 48. N. Currier. Lithograph, undated. Image size 12 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches. Shown seated in white dress with red cloak, hand strumming a lute. LINK.

Maria. : 48. Nathaniel Currier. Lithograph, undated. Image size 12 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches. Shown seated in white dress with red cloak, hand strumming a lute. LINK.

Josephine. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, undated.  Vignette 12 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. Shown in white lace dress with pink trim, wearing a gold double-strand necklace, with dark hair swept up in a jeweled headband.

Josephine. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, undated. Vignette 12 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. Shown in white lace dress with pink trim, wearing a gold double-strand necklace, with dark hair swept up in a jeweled headband. LINK.

Catherine.  Nathaniel Currier. Lithograph, 1845. Image size 11 5/8 x 8 1/16 inches. A full length portrait, with Catherine shown seated in a red dress, bouquet in hand and roses in a large vase on table. LINK.

Catherine. Nathaniel Currier. Lithograph, 1845. Image size 11 5/8 x 8 1/16 inches. A full length portrait, with Catherine shown seated in a red dress, bouquet in hand and roses in a large vase on table. LINK.

The Pride of the West. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, 1870. Image size 12 x 8 inches. Portrait of woman with  a red gown and roses woven throughout her hair. LINK.

The Pride of the West. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, 1870. Image size 12 x 8 inches. Portrait of woman with a red gown and roses woven throughout her hair. LINK.

The Eastern Beauty. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, undated. Vignette 11 7/8 x 7 5/8 inches. A carefully drawn woman, adorned with a red bow at her neck. LINK.

The Eastern Beauty. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, undated. Vignette 11 7/8 x 7 5/8 inches. A carefully drawn woman, adorned with a red bow at her neck. LINK.

Julia. Currier and Ives. Lithograph,  undated. Vignette 12 3/8 x 9 inches. This portrait shows a more mature woman in a blue dress adorned with pink roses. LINK.

Julia. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, undated. Vignette 12 3/8 x 9 inches. This portrait shows a more mature woman in a blue dress adorned with pink roses. LINK.

Susie. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, undated. Vignette 12 3/4 x 8 7/8 inches. A coquette with long, dark curls tied by a pink hair-bow gives a sidelong glance. LINK.

Susie. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, undated. Vignette 12 3/4 x 8 7/8 inches. A coquette with long, dark curls tied by a pink hair-bow gives a sidelong glance. LINK.

Henrietta. Nathaniel Currier. Lithograph, undated. Image size 12 1/8 x 8 1/2 inches. Yellow roses adorn an eyelet ruffled dress. LINK.

Henrietta. Nathaniel Currier. Lithograph, undated. Image size 12 1/8 x 8 1/2 inches. Yellow roses adorn an eyelet ruffled dress. LINK.

Josephine. Nathaniel Currier. Lithograph, undated. Image size 11 5/8 x 8 1/2 inches. A formal setting with gown of rose and white. LINK.

Josephine. Nathaniel Currier. Lithograph, undated. Image size 11 5/8 x 8 1/2 inches. A formal setting with gown of rose and white. LINK.

Mary. N. Currier. Lithograph, 1845. Image size 12 x 8 5/8". Shown in full-length lace-trimmed dress, with a picture of the S.S. Swallow on the wall behind her. LINK.

Mary. Nathaniel Currier. Lithograph, 1845. Image size 12 x 8 5/8″. Shown in full-length lace-trimmed dress, with a picture of the S.S. Swallow on the wall behind her. LINK.

Spring. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, 1870. Vignette 12 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches.  Multicolored flowers in her hair and bouquet accent a blue dress and bow. LINK.

Spring. Currier and Ives. Lithograph, 1870. Vignette 12 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches. Multicolored flowers in her hair and bouquet accent a blue dress and bow. LINK.

 

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18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, Americana, Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Updates, Maps, OPG Showcase, Portraits, Prints

Upcoming at The Old Print Gallery

87117Our Winter Contemporary Show is up on the gallery walls for only 2 more days. Works by thirteen contemporary printmakers, all created within the last two years, were chosen for the show. The prints selected are an impressive, alluring display of the current eclecticism found in contemporary printmaking. The show includes work by three local DC artists-Jake Muirhead, Susan Goldman, and Philip Bennet- as well as many regional and international printmakers. Stop by to see these prints before the walls change.

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Tonal Array: Aquatints from the 20th and 21st Century opens next Friday, February 20th, with an opening reception from 5-7 pm at the gallery.  Tonal Array draws attention to the talented printmakers of the 20th and 21st century who experimented and pushed the boundaries of aquatint’s potential. Varying between flat color planes and incredible plate texture, these artists demonstrate a fluid and experimental handling of the medium. The resulting images have an expressive strength and visual intensity that relay the ingenuity to be found in the world of original printmaking. The show will remain on view until April 11th, 2015.

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Our February 2015 Showcase will hit mailboxes next week. This edition draws heavily on a collection of historic American prints and portraits, as well as important Revolutionary War maps. Several pieces selected for the catalog  are exceptionally rare works of Americana and rarely show up on the market or at auction.

 

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Abstract, American Views, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, New Additions, Portraits, Prints, Serigraph

New Additions: 20th Century Printmakers Pt. 2

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing three more additions to our 20th century inventory- works by Irwin D. Hoffman, Morris A. Blackburn, and William C. McNulty. Read on below for information about the artists’ lives, travels, and studies. We also invite you to check out our yesterday’s post, a showcase of new prints by American printmakers John J.A. Murphy, Norma Bassett Hall, and Roi Partridge. Our inventory is constantly expanding and changing, especially in the field of 20th century and contemporary prints.


 Irwin D. Hoffman (1901- 1989)

Hoffman was born in East Boston, a son of Russian immigrant parents. He enrolled as a part-time student at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts at the very young age of 15, later attending the school as a full-time student on scholarship once he graduated from high school. His first solo show was at the age of 19 at Grace Horne Galleries, where he was reviewed by the press as “a prodigy in portraiture.” He was awarded the Paige Traveling Scholarship in 1924, prompting travels throughout Europe, where he studied the old masters of painting and was introduced to the new wave of European modern art. Returning from Europe, he opened a studio in New York City, a space he worked and lived in the rest of his career.

In the 1930s and 40s, Hoffman traveled extensively to the southwestern United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico, visiting his two brothers who owned a mining company and worked as prospectors. Much of his artistic output was a result of these travels- including portraits of the miners he befriended and etchings of the small mining communities he visited.

Mexican Miner. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1933. Edition unknown. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Mexican Miner. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1933. Edition unknown. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Miner at Rest. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1937. Edition 50. Signed and titled in pencil.  Second printing, c.1975. LINK.

Miner at Rest. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1937. Edition 50. Signed and titled in pencil. Second printing, c.1975. LINK.

 

 

 


Morris A. Blackburn (1902- 1979)

Born in Philadelphia, Blackburn studied at The Graphic Sketch Club and the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art, later continuing his education at The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Blackburn was one of the first artists to use silkscreen (serigraphs) for fine art prints in the early 1940s, a printmaking technique he learned in WWII doing war posters and camouflage.

Known for exploring traditional and new printmaking techniques, Blackburn’s early prints were compositions of flat, bright color, moving towards abstraction. In fact, Blackburn experimented with all different media, including pottery, murals, furniture construction, and painting. He also wrote extensive and highly descriptive diaries, which offer great insights into his life as an instructor at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, new techniques he had learned, and records of his art sales and exhibitions.

Blackburn won two Cresson Traveling Scholarships and the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. His travels to Vienna, London, and Paris introduced him to works by artists like Egon Schiele, Gustav Klimt, Turner, and Cezanne. He also studied printmaking at Stanley Hayter’s workshops at the Print Club, and the interactions with artist there were energizing and inspiring for the innovative Blackburn.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. LINK.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. LINK.


William C. McNulty (1889- 1963)

Born in Utah, McNulty studied at the Art Students League from 1908- 1909. McNulty began his artistic career as a newspaper artist and editorial cartoonist, working in Nebraska, Montana, and for several years at the Seattle Star under the pen name of VON-A. Encouraged to try his hand at etching by Joseph Pennell, McNulty became a talented printmaker, using New York City as his inspiration. He was exhibiting prints by 1927 and had prints included in the first International Exhibition of Etching organized by the Art Institute of Chicago in 1932. He taught illustration and composition at the Art Student League from 1931 to 1958, and simmer art school in Rockport, Massachusetts. Described as a “romantic realist” by a 1963 New York Times article, McNulty created prints of the city’s architecture and street life, all imbued with a sense of grandeur and resplendence. His later work was an eclectic mix of prints of circus performers, NYC dock scenes, pictures of bustling street markets, and experimentations with abstract, mosaic-like assemblages of interlocking flat shapes.

The Whirlpool. By William C. McNulty. Drypoint, 1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

The Whirlpool. By William C. McNulty. Drypoint, 1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

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