19th Century Maps, American Maps, Lithograph, Maps, Pocket Maps

Rare Confederate imprint of “Map of the Seat of War”

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8" (521 x 650 mm) plus margins. LINK.

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8″ (521 x 650 mm) plus margins.  LINK.

The map we are sharing in today’s blog post is an extremely rare Confederate imprint, Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia by Evans & Cogswell.  Printed in 1861, this unusual pocket map shows the coastal area from Georgetown, South Carolina, to Savannah, Georgia, and territory inland as far north as Kingstree, South Carolina, and west to Barnwell, South Carolina. The map notes the location of forts, rivers, roads, railroads, ferries, bridges, dwellings with names of inhabitants, churches, and post offices. In the lower right is an inset map titled “Portion of Georgia” which shows Savannah and the nearby areas to the south and east. Drawn on a scale of one inch to five miles, this map was originally issued as a folding pocket map, although this particular example lacks the original covers.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A detailed look at  the inset map,  “Portion of Georgia.”

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A detailed look at the inset map, “Portion of Georgia.”

Very few examples of this map are known to exist. During the Civil War, map publishers in the South were limited by access to paper, presses, and experienced lithographers and engravers. Those who did publish from the Confederate states did so in smaller edition sizes and with much less frequency.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A close-up view of the publisher's imprint.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A close-up view of the publisher’s imprint.

This map, a lithograph, was printed by Evans & Cogswell, a company based at 3 Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina. The firm of Walker, Evans & Cogswell was founded in Charleston in 1821. They were printers as well as stationers. In 1860, Walker died and the business continued as Evans & Cogswell. While the firm printed a handful of maps during their existence, they are best remembered for printing the Ordinance of Secession. They also printed small denomination currency, Government bonds, the Soldier’s Prayer Book, books on war tactics, stamps, and medical books for the Confederacy. Later in the war, the firm moved to Columbia hoping for protection from the war. Soon after their move, the business was burned during Gen. Sherman’s infamous March to the Sea. We urge all map enthusiasts to stop by our gallery to see this map in person. This imprint would make an impressive addition to any Civil War map collection.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Pocket Maps, Stone

New Additions: Washington DC Pocket Map

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe just added an early pocket map of Washington DC to our inventory. Pocket maps, sometimes called case maps, are separately-issued, folding maps attached or slid into a hard cover. They first appeared in the United States in the 1820s and 30s, partly prompted by the burgeoning development of railways. The early pocket maps emphasize new railroad lines, canals, and road distances, sometimes with charts of calculated travel times to and from key cities. During the Civil War, pocket maps had significant military use due to portability and lower production costs. Later pocket maps were used like advertisements, produced by entrepreneurial business owners and travel companies.

Hope you enjoy!

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Map of the City of Washington. By F. C. DeKrafft. Published by A. Rothwell. Stone engraving,1836. 15 3/8 x 20 3/4″ plus hairline margins. Retains original red leather covers with gold tooled title, “City of Washington.” Accompanied by a 18 page guide to the city with the title, “Picture of the City of Washington, Being a Concise Description of the City, Public Buildings, &c. Accompanied by a correct map.” Of note, the newly formed “Jackson City” (1835) in shown across the Long Bridge in Virginia. The railroad route to Baltimore is also shown prominently on the map. Engraved by Mrs. W. I. Stone. B. Homans, printer  LINK.

 

 

 

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps

The Tourist’s Guide Pocket Map

The Tourist's Guide through the States of Maryland, Delaware and Parts of Pennsylvania & Virginia, with the Routes to their Springs, &c. By Fielding Lucas, Jr. Engraving, 1836. Image zie 13 7/8 x 19 5/8" (498 x 353 mm) plus margins.  LINK.

The Tourist’s Guide through the States of Maryland, Delaware and Parts of Pennsylvania & Virginia, with the Routes to their Springs, &c. By Fielding Lucas, Jr. Engraving, 1836. Image size 13 7/8 x 19 5/8″ (498 x 353 mm) plus margins. LINK.

New to the OPG inventory is a rare travelers pocket guide map of Maryland, Virginia, Delaware & the Chesapeake Region, by Fielding Lucas, Jr. This well delineated early 19th century map depicts the early roads (main and common), canals, and the railroads, which at the time of publishing were a new mode of transportation. The rail lines on this map are outlined in red, and include the route from Richmond to Fredericksburg, Washington to Baltimore, with a branch to Annapolis, and Baltimore to the western mining regions of Winchester and Cumberland. A table of distances from Baltimore to various cities and springs is shown in the upper right and central left.

Fielding Lucas Jr. was most active prior to 1825. He published his New & Elegant Atlas and contributed to the maps of Carey & Lea. Lucas issued very few pocket maps and most are very rare, especially those issued after 1830.

This particular map is bound into the original gold embossed covers with the title “Map of Maryland and Part of Virginia &c.”

To see other pocket maps available  at The Old Print Gallery, we invite you to visit our website. 

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