Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Landscapes, Prints, Screenprint, Serigraph, Silkscreen

Serigraphy

Serigraphy ( also known as screen-printing or silk screen) is a versatile printing process, based on the stencil principle. The method first appeared in China during the Song Dynasty (960–1279 AD), and gained popularity in 18th century Europe, thanks to imports of silk from the East. A group of WPA artists, who later formed the National Serigraphic Society, coined the word “serigraphy” in the 1930s in effort to differentiate the artistic application from the commercial printing application. Serigraphy was later made famous in the 1960s by Andy Warhol, who used the medium to achieve a bold, commercial look in his pop-icon prints.

To make a serigraph, a fine woven fabric is tightly stretched and attached to a metal or sturdy wood frame. This forms the printing screen. A stencil is then created on the screen, by the application of a blockout. Artists have experimented with numerous blockout methods over time- including paper, hand-cut film, glue, photosensitive emulsion, and gelatin film. The blockout areas become the non-image areas. After the blockout is laid and dried, paper is placed below the screen and thick ink is squeezed into a line across the top of the screen. The ink is then dragged along the surface of the screen with a squeegee. This forces the ink to pass through the open area of the stencil onto the paper below. For multi-colored prints, a separate screen is required for each color.

Below are several serigraph prints we have in our OPG inventory, by early 20th century and contemporary artists. Hope you enjoy!

Trio. Dorie Marder. Serigraph, 1945. Image size 14 7/8 x 10 7/8" (377 x 276 mm). Edition 45. LINK.

Trio. By Dorie Marder. Serigraph, 1945. Image size 14 7/8 x 10 7/8″ (377 x 276 mm). Edition 45. LINK.

Urban Views.  (Large) #6B. Patrick J. Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 6 x 6" (151 x 151 mm). Edition 12. LINK.

Urban Views. (Large) #6B.  By Patrick J. Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 6 x 6″ (151 x 151 mm). Edition 12. LINK.

Coastal Whimsey. Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2" (210 x 320 mm). Edition 55. LINK.

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2″ (210 x 320 mm). Edition 55. LINK.

Prairie Sunset. Allan Simpson. Serigraph, 1987. Image size 16 5/16 x 20 1/4" (416 x 514 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Prairie Sunset. By Allan Simpson. Serigraph, 1987. Image size 16 5/16 x 20 1/4″ (416 x 514 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Dancing. Thomas Seawell. Serigraph and archival digital, 2010. Tondo - diameter 9 1/2 x 9 1/2" (240 mm). Edition 10. LINK.

Dancing.  By Thomas Seawell. Serigraph and archival digital, 2010. Tondo – diameter 9 1/2 x 9 1/2″ (240 mm). Edition 10. LINK.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950.  8 5/8 x 12" (227 x 305 mm). LINK.

Space Planes.  By Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. 8 5/8 x 12″ (227 x 305 mm). LINK.

Pet. Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1967. Image size 2 3/4 x 2" (72 x 40 mm).  Edition 51. LINK.

Pet. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1967. Image size 2 3/4 x 2″ (72 x 40 mm). Edition 51. LINK.

Point Blank Distance. By Masaaki Noda. Serigraph, 1996. Image size 12 1/8 x 19 1/4" (308 x 488 mm). Edition 40. LINK.

Point Blank Distance. By Masaaki Noda. Serigraph, 1996. Image size 12 1/8 x 19 1/4″ (308 x 488 mm). Edition 40. LINK.

Hartling Bay. Richard T. Davis. Color serigraph, 1993. Image size 17 3/4 x 20 1/4" (445 x 509 mm). Edition 145. LINK.

Hartling Bay. By Richard T. Davis. Color serigraph, 1993. Image size 17 3/4 x 20 1/4″ (445 x 509 mm). Edition 145. LINK.

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American Views, Citiscapes, Color Lithograph, Contemporary, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Foreign Views, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Lithograph, Prints, Serigraph

Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print

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The Shadow of Brooklyn Bridge. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, 1988. Ed. 100. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its summer 2014 show, Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print. This group show of 19 printmakers spans over 90 years of creative expression, with prints by 20th century American masters John Taylor Arms, Martin Lewis, and Armin Landeck coupled with works by cutting-edge, contemporary printmakers. Form, Light, Line opens on Friday, June 20, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-8pm. The show will remain on view until September 13, 2014.

Artists have long found beauty in the strength, durability, and utility of architecture. Form, Light, Line allows viewers to experience the familiar composition of buildings through the artist’s eye- to visually explore how surface captures light, how windows both reveal and reflect, and how dimensional spaces can be flattened and abstracted into planes of light and dark.

(From Left to Right:) Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2B. Urban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003.

From Left to Right: Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2BUrban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003. LINK.

Highlights include a trio of black and white graphic serigraphs by Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms’ meticulous 1927 etching Lace in Stone, Rouen Cathedral, and a 1929 study for a large watercolor, Spiral Staircase, from the Martin Lewis estate. This pen and ink representation of the Queensboro Bridge is a delicate exploration of space and shading. Also on view is an Armin Landek 1941 engraving Rooftop, with accompanying annotated pen and pencil study for the print. The pair reveals the artist’s approach to perspective, as well as sketches of specific architectural elements, like moldings and chimneys.

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A Bronx Street Corner. By Martin Lewis. Pencil drawing, c.1946. LINK.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms, William Behnken, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Joan Drew, Richard Haas, Su-Li Hung, Sidney Hurwitz, Armin Landeck, Martin Levine, Martin Lewis, Frederick Mershimer, John Ross, Emilio Sanchez, Art Werger, Steven Yamin, and Alex Zwarenstein.

To see all the prints selected for Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print, please visit our website.

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Bronze, Chromolithograph, Contemporary, Copperplate, Drypoint, Engraving, Etching, Lithograph, Maps, Mezzotint, Prints, Sculpture, Serigraph

The 2012 Father’s Day Gift Guide

Father’s Day is next weekend. If you are still looking for a gift to get your dad, granddad, or partner in parenting, take a look at some of our suggestions below. Happy gifting and good luck!

OPG 2010 Father's Day Gift Guide

1. Urban Views. (Large) #1. By Patrick J. Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Inscribed “3/12.” Anderson is a contemporary artist, currently living in Seattle.  $200.00 LINK

2. Civil War Uniforms (supplied title). Plate CLXXII. Published by the U.S. Government, Washington, DC. Chromolithograph, 1895. Lithographed by Julius Bien & Co. From “Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861 – 1865”. Two rows of officer and soldier uniforms from both armies are separated by Illustrations of badges, buttons and other insignia. $425.00 LINK

3. America sive India Nova. By Michael Mercator. Published by Rumold Mercator, Duisburg. Copper plate engraving, 1595-1633.  Latin text (1616). This map is one of the most striking early maps of the Western Hemisphere. Michael Mercator, grandson of Gerard, engraved this plate, the only known printed map by him. $6,000.00 LINK

4. Baseball. By Jake Muirhead. Etching, aquatint, and drypoint, 2010. Inscribed, “A/P.” Muirhead is a local Washington, DC-based printmaker. $400.00 LINK

5. That Moment. By Art Werger. Mezzotint, 2010. Inscribed “10/25.”Art Werger is a contemporary artists who works and teaches out of Ohio University in Athens, OH. $100.00 LINK

6. Washington Receiving A Salute on the Field of Trenton. By John Faed. Engraved by William Holl. Published exclusively for the subscribers by the National Art Association of New York. Mixed-media engraving, 1865. With facsimile signature of George Washington. This handsome portrait depicts Washington as commander-in-chief, sword in hand, mounted on a white steed. $1,800.00 LINK

7. Cheetah Swerving. By Robert Cook. Bronze, 1992. Created using the lost-wax process. Cook’s prints and sculptures are currently on view at our Georgetown, DC gallery, in the exhibit Capturing the Verve. $3,500.00. LINK

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