Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

ETCHED

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.  (Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.
(Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

We are very excited to announce ETCHED, our upcoming OPG show of early 20th century and contemporary original etchings, which will open Friday, February 21, 2014. The gallery will host a nighttime reception that Friday, from 5-8pm, which is open and free to the public. The show will remain on view at the gallery until April 5, 2014, during normal gallery hours.

Etching as a form of printmaking evolved from metal workshops of the Middle Ages, where swords, armor, and tools were all etched with acid to produce intricate line and scroll work. Daniel Hopfer, a 16th century craftsman, applied these metalworking techniques to iron printmaking plates, and was the first to use etching as a form of printmaking. Many artists were soon lured by etching’s capacity to capture the essence and spontaneity of the artist’s hand in printed form.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

ETCHED will celebrate the long legacy of printmakers who specialize in and focus on etching as a way of image making. As the show pulls from over a century of creative expression, viewers will be fascinated by the myriad of ways an artist can use an etched line to create tone, atmosphere, and detail. The show also highlights new technical advances in etching, including multi-plate color etchings and experimental solar plate etchings.

Highlights include meticulously etched architectural views by John Taylor Arms, two direct and intimate portraits by Isabel Bishop and Nicholas Vagenas, and  velvety and dense lines found in works by Peter Milton and Otto Kuhler.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Selected Artists: Sigmund Abeles, John Taylor Arms, Frank W. Benson, Robert Birmelin, Isabel Bishop, Richard Carleton, Arthur Cohen, Robert Cook, Joseph Essig, Takuji Kubo, Otto Kuhler, Yvette Lucas, Charles F. Mielatz, Peter Milton, Ellen Nathan Singer, Joseph Pennell, Susan Pyzow, Nicholas Vagenas, Hank Virgona, Bruce Waldman.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

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19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Contemporary, Engraving, Etching, Past/Present, Prints, Wood

Past/Present: Astronomy

Today our  P/P post features two sky-gazing prints. Our print from the past is of astronomers observing the Transit of Venus on December 6, 1882, an event where the planet Venus passes between the Sun and the Earth, slightly obscuring the solar disk. Transits of Venus are among the rarest of predictable astronomical phenomena. They occur in a pattern that repeats every 243 years, with pairs of transits eight years apart separated by long gaps of 121 years and 105 years. The periodicity is a reflection of the fact Earth and Venus arrive at almost the same configuration after 8 Earth orbits and 13 Venus orbits. The mismatch after 8 years is only 1.5° off Venus’ orbital movement. Still, this is enough that Venus and Earth find themselves in the opposite relative orientation to the original every 120 such cycles.

A transit of Venus took place on June 8, 2004 and the next will be on June 6 of this year. The previous pair of transits was in December 1874 and December 1882. After 2012, the next transits of Venus will be in December 2117 and December 2125.  Aside from its rarity, the original scientific interest in observing a transit of Venus was that it could be used to determine the distance from Earth to the sun, and from this, an estimation of size of the solar system can be made.

Our contemporary print is by NY printmaker Nicholas Vagenas, and highlights the complexity of our solar system- the vast amount that is still unknown, even to astronomers working with today’s modern methods of measure and observation.

Image on Left: Connecticut. The observations of the Transit of Venus by German Astronomers, Prof. Muller and Deichmuller, at Trinity College, Hartford, Dec. 6.) by C. Upham. Published by Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. Wood engraving, Dec.16, 1882.

Image on Right: Nothing is Certain by Nicholas Vagenas. Etching and aquatint, 2003.  Ed. 3/15.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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