19th Century Prints, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Railroad Waiting Room

We have a new Past/Present post for our readers today, featuring two railroad scenes. The older print is a circa 1888 hand-colored engraving of a waiting room scene at a railway depot. The title on the verso of the print is “The Every-Day Life of Railroad Men”. This scene is repeated again in a 20th century lithograph by Charles Locke, entitled “Waiting Room.”

Charles Locke was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on August 31, 1899. He studied at the Cincinnati Art Academy and the Ohio Mechanics Institute. He came to New York City in 1922 with Joseph Pennell to help teach lithography at the Art Students League, where he remained until 1937. He traveled to Paris in 1928 on a grant from Mrs. John D. Rockefeller to study the work of French painters. His students included John S. Curry, Paul Cadmus, and Don Freeman. As well as being a teacher at the League, he was also a student- learning etching from a friend and fellow instructor, Allen Lewis. Locke is well-known for his role as an educator, and for his prints of New York City docks, bars, shops, and everyday street-life.

Image on the left: In the Waiting Room of the Country Station. Engraving, hand-colored, c. 1988.

Image on the right: Waiting Room by Charles Locke. Lithograph. Edition of 40. Signed and editioned in pencil by the artist.

62164

29510

 

 

 

Standard
Abstract, American Views, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, New Additions, Portraits, Prints, Serigraph

New Additions: 20th Century Printmakers Pt. 2

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing three more additions to our 20th century inventory- works by Irwin D. Hoffman, Morris A. Blackburn, and William C. McNulty. Read on below for information about the artists’ lives, travels, and studies. We also invite you to check out our yesterday’s post, a showcase of new prints by American printmakers John J.A. Murphy, Norma Bassett Hall, and Roi Partridge. Our inventory is constantly expanding and changing, especially in the field of 20th century and contemporary prints.


 Irwin D. Hoffman (1901- 1989)

Hoffman was born in East Boston, a son of Russian immigrant parents. He enrolled as a part-time student at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts at the very young age of 15, later attending the school as a full-time student on scholarship once he graduated from high school. His first solo show was at the age of 19 at Grace Horne Galleries, where he was reviewed by the press as “a prodigy in portraiture.” He was awarded the Paige Traveling Scholarship in 1924, prompting travels throughout Europe, where he studied the old masters of painting and was introduced to the new wave of European modern art. Returning from Europe, he opened a studio in New York City, a space he worked and lived in the rest of his career.

In the 1930s and 40s, Hoffman traveled extensively to the southwestern United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico, visiting his two brothers who owned a mining company and worked as prospectors. Much of his artistic output was a result of these travels- including portraits of the miners he befriended and etchings of the small mining communities he visited.

Mexican Miner. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1933. Edition unknown. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Mexican Miner. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1933. Edition unknown. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Miner at Rest. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1937. Edition 50. Signed and titled in pencil.  Second printing, c.1975. LINK.

Miner at Rest. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1937. Edition 50. Signed and titled in pencil. Second printing, c.1975. LINK.

 

 

 


Morris A. Blackburn (1902- 1979)

Born in Philadelphia, Blackburn studied at The Graphic Sketch Club and the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art, later continuing his education at The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Blackburn was one of the first artists to use silkscreen (serigraphs) for fine art prints in the early 1940s, a printmaking technique he learned in WWII doing war posters and camouflage.

Known for exploring traditional and new printmaking techniques, Blackburn’s early prints were compositions of flat, bright color, moving towards abstraction. In fact, Blackburn experimented with all different media, including pottery, murals, furniture construction, and painting. He also wrote extensive and highly descriptive diaries, which offer great insights into his life as an instructor at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, new techniques he had learned, and records of his art sales and exhibitions.

Blackburn won two Cresson Traveling Scholarships and the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. His travels to Vienna, London, and Paris introduced him to works by artists like Egon Schiele, Gustav Klimt, Turner, and Cezanne. He also studied printmaking at Stanley Hayter’s workshops at the Print Club, and the interactions with artist there were energizing and inspiring for the innovative Blackburn.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. LINK.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. LINK.


William C. McNulty (1889- 1963)

Born in Utah, McNulty studied at the Art Students League from 1908- 1909. McNulty began his artistic career as a newspaper artist and editorial cartoonist, working in Nebraska, Montana, and for several years at the Seattle Star under the pen name of VON-A. Encouraged to try his hand at etching by Joseph Pennell, McNulty became a talented printmaker, using New York City as his inspiration. He was exhibiting prints by 1927 and had prints included in the first International Exhibition of Etching organized by the Art Institute of Chicago in 1932. He taught illustration and composition at the Art Student League from 1931 to 1958, and simmer art school in Rockport, Massachusetts. Described as a “romantic realist” by a 1963 New York Times article, McNulty created prints of the city’s architecture and street life, all imbued with a sense of grandeur and resplendence. His later work was an eclectic mix of prints of circus performers, NYC dock scenes, pictures of bustling street markets, and experimentations with abstract, mosaic-like assemblages of interlocking flat shapes.

The Whirlpool. By William C. McNulty. Drypoint, 1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

The Whirlpool. By William C. McNulty. Drypoint, 1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

Standard
Citiscapes, Color etching, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Landscapes, Multi-plate etching, Prints

Charles Mielatz

Scene of Cows and an Old Well in a Pasture. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1911. LINK.

Scene of Cows and an Old Well in a Pasture. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1911. LINK.

Charles Frederick William Mielatz was born in Bredding, Germany in 1864. He arrived in this country as a young boy and studied at the Chicago School of Design. Mostly self-taught, his first prints were large New England landscapes reminiscent of the painter-etcher school of American art. In 1889, he was invited by the Iconofiles Society to produce a print of Wall Street. He fell in love with the urban landscape and for the rest of his life, Mielatz created urban imagery.

Porch of the Old Customs House (Wall Street). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1909. LINK.

Porch of the Old Customs House (Wall Street). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1909. LINK.

Mielatz was a master technician in the field of etching, reworking many of his plates numerous times to precisely master the feeling and composition he was seeking in his images. It is not unusual for him to have many states of each print. He was also one of the early pioneers of multi-plate color etchings in this country. Although the process dates back to the eighteenth-century, for most of the nineteenth-century it was not used. It is thought that the color prints of Mary Cassatt could have influenced him.

Spingler-Van Beuren - The Covered Porch. Charles Mielatz. Color etching, 1913. LINK.

Spingler-Van Beuren – The Covered Porch. Charles Mielatz. Color etching, 1913. LINK.

The Door of St. Bartholomew's. Charles Mielatz.  Three-plate color etching, 1909. LINK.

The Door of St. Bartholomew’s. Charles Mielatz. Three-plate color etching, 1909. LINK.

Although there is no hard documentation that he influenced other artists active in New York City, his choice of etching style is remarkably similar to the drypoints that Martin Lewis produced in the late 1920’s, and his choice of subject matter is not dissimilar to that of John Sloan, who started producing etchings of NYC by 1905.

Old Spar Yard, South Street. Charles Mielatz. Etching, roulette, and sandpaper, undated. LINK.

Old Spar Yard, South Street. Charles Mielatz. Etching, roulette, and sandpaper, undated. LINK.

Charles Mielatz was a member of the New York Etching Club, the Brooklyn Society of Etchers, and was an associate member of the National Academy of Design. In 1906, he succeeded James David Smillie as the etching teacher at the National Academy, a position he held until his death on June 2, 1919.

The Jumel Mansion. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1906. LINK.

The Jumel Mansion. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1906. LINK.

Edgar Street (The Shortest Street in New York City). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1910. LINK.

Edgar Street (The Shortest Street in New York City). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1910. LINK.

Ericsson's Day No.1. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1914. LINK.

Ericsson’s Day No.1. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1914. LINK.

Standard
18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Event, Gallery Updates, Prints

2013 IFPDA Print Fair

print-fair

The IFPDA Print Fair is this week and our partner The Old Print Shop is exhibiting. If you are looking for something excited and print-related to do this weekend, we urge you to attend the fair and see some of the best contemporary, early 20th century, and antique prints available. The fair is unique among the world’s major art fairs for its focus on fine prints from all periods. And while the Fair is known among museum curators and major collectors for its rare and exceptional prints, excellent works can be found in all price ranges, including exciting new projects from today’s leading and emerging artists.

The Town Home. By Blanche Lazzell. White-line woodcut, 1928.

The Town Home. By Blanche Lazzell. White-line woodcut, 1928.

The Old Print Shop is at Booth 205. Stop by to say “hi” and peruse their great selection of prints. Ticket prices are as follows:  Daily- $20 [$10 for 65 and older and students with I.D.]; Two-day Pass-$30; Run-of-Show- $40.

Fair Hours:

THURSDAY 11/07: 12 – 8 pm
FRIDAY 11/08: 12 – 8 pm
SATURDAY 11/09: 12 – 8 pm
SUNDAY 11/10: 12 – 6 pm

The Print Fair takes place at the historic Park Avenue Armory located at 643 Park Avenue between 66th and 67th Streets in the heart of Manhattan’s elegant Upper East Side.

ifpda fair

 

For more information, including directions, a list of dealers, and print-related articles, visit the IFPDA Print Fair Website. 

Standard
American Views, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Rain

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two rainy day prints by Martin Lewis and Richard Florsheim. Martin Lewis was born on June 7, 1881 in Castlemaine, Australia. He was the second of eight children and he had a passion for drawing. At the age of fifteen he left home and traveled in New South Wales and New Zealand, working as a post hole digger and a merchant seaman before settling into a Bohemian community outside of Sidney. Two of his drawings were published in a radical Sydney newspaper, the Bulletin. He also studied with Julian Ashton at the Art Society’s School in Sydney. Ashton, a famous painter, was also one the first Australian artists to take up printmaking.

In 1900, Lewis left for the United States. His first known job after arriving in the United States was painting stage decorations for the McKinley Presidential Campaign of 1900. Little is known of his early years in this country; however, by 1909 he was living and working in New York City. With the exception of a few years, he spent the rest of his life in and around the city. His earliest etching dates from 1915 but shows a technical ability that suggests that he had been working in the medium for some time. During these early years, Lewis experimented with different intaglio processes including etching, aquatint, engraving, mezzotint, and drypoint.

In 1920, Lewis left for Japan, a turning point in his artistic career. He studied the art and culture of Japan. During his eighteen-month stay, he spent his time painting in both oil and watercolor. He did not work in printmaking again until 1925, when he produced a group of etchings and drypoints depicting Japan. These new prints led him several years later to produce many memorable images of New York City. The period of 1925 through 1935 was his most productive, during which he produced eighty-one of his one hundred and forty-eight known prints.

Richard Florsheim was active as a painter, sculptor and graphics artist in Chicago, Milwaukee, Provincetown, and Woodstock, New York. Florsheim was born in Chicago in 1916, to a very wealthy family. He spent his youth and early adulthood studying at the University of Chicago and in New York with artist Aaron Bohrod. His father paid for a lengthy European independent study, where Florsheim exhibited at Salon des Refusés, and the Musée du Jeu de Paume honored him by purchasing one of his paintings, Don Quixote.

Florsheim returned to Chicago in 1939, and began lithography in 1940, exhibiting at the Quest Gallery and working out of a studio on North Avenue. He then enlisted in the US Navy, active in the Pacific Theater as a cartographer. It was at this time that he also obtained patents for his radar plane-spotting technique.

After the war, he resumed his artistic career, exhibiting widely. He helped found the Artists’ League of the Midwest with Artists’ Equity Association of New York. He was assistant director of the Arts Center Association, 1951-52, and taught at the Layton School of Art in Milwaukee from 1949 to 1950, and the Contemporary Art Workshop in Chicago from 1952 to 1963. From 1965 to 1973, he was a board member of the Illinois Arts Council.  Florsheim was a member of the National Academy of Design, the Society of American Graphic Artists, the Provincetown Art Association, which he served as Trustee and Vice President from 1962 to 1971, and the Chicago Society of Artists.

Image on Right: Rain on Murray Hill.  By Martin Lewis. Drypoint, 1928. Recorded impressions 100.

Image on Left: City Rain. By Richard Florsheim. Published by The Associated American Artists. Lithograph, 1976. Edition of 250.

875

36793

Standard