Prints

“Light, Shadow & Time” opens May 20th

Reflections on a Crosstown Vista.  Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2015 Image size 12 1/16 x 12 1/16" (30.7 x 30.7 cm).

Reflections on a Crosstown Vista. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2015. Image size 12 1/16 x 12 1/16″ (30.7 x 30.7 cm). LINK.

We are excited to announce our upcoming summer show, Light, Shadow & Time, a group of contemporary prints from 16 talented emerging and established printmakers. The prints selected are an eclectic mix, but all explore the patterns found in our natural and manufactured world. Whether by exploring the layering and rearrangement of natural textures or the effect of light and time on a subject, these artists see compositions in the everyday, the fleeting, the organic, and the microscopic. Light, Shadow & Time opens on Friday, May 20 and runs through Saturday, September 10, 2016.

With an important focus on the temporal and ephemeral interplay between architecture and light, Patrick Anderson and James Haggerty create dynamic scenes out of shifting shadows, highlighting the emotive warmth and coolness of light. Similarly, Grace Bentley Scheck’s collagraph explores the passage of time “recorded in the marks left by functional changes made in structures over many years, by human design or the elements, and in changing patterns of light and shadow as the sun makes its daily journey across the sky.”

Early Morning Light. Patrick Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 4 1/4 x 4 1/4" (10.8 x 10.8 cm). LINK.

Early Morning Light. Patrick Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 4 1/4 x 4 1/4″ (10.8 x 10.8 cm). LINK.

In a trio of highly patterned, organic collages entitled “Room to Grow” Heather McMordie links the puzzle-like nature of printmaking and geology.  Creating three large editions from one woodblock and one lithographic stone, and then drawing on, cutting apart, and piecing together these editions, McMordie takes the composition in as many different directions as possible, paralleling how a combination of just a few elements can create countless different minerals, rocks, and soils. Pattern in nature is further explored in Barbara Milton’s dizzying examination of layered tree leaves, Cleo Wilkinsons’ haunting portrait of the folds and subtle curves of a hibiscus flower, and Nancy Previs’ intimate, mystical composition of water flowing over rough rock, printed in green tint.

All together, the show encourages the viewers to pause, see, and reflect on the spaces, natural or man-made, that they occupy throughout the day.

Selected Artists: Patrick Anderson, Philip Bennet, Grace Bentley Scheck, Steven Brigidi, Richard T. Davis, James Haggerty, Heather McMordie, Barbara Minton, Jake Muirhead, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Ellen Nathan Singer, Nancy Previs, Steven Walker, Larry Welo, Art Werger, and Cleo Wilkinson.

Celestial Light. [The Metropolitan Museum of Art.] By James Haggerty. Etching and chine colle, 2004. Image size 11 11/6 x 5 13/16" (297 x 147 mm). LINK.

Celestial Light. [The Metropolitan Museum of Art.] By James Haggerty. Etching and chine colle, 2004. Image size 11 11/6 x 5 13/16″ (297 x 147 mm). LINK.

Verdure. By Barbara Minton. Etching and aquatint printed in color, 2000. Image size 17 3/8 x 14 3/4" (44.1 x 37.5 cm). LINK.

Verdure. By Barbara Minton. Etching and aquatint printed in color, 2000. Image size 17 3/8 x 14 3/4″ (44.1 x 37.5 cm). LINK.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Prints

Charles Burchfield on Nature

Summer Benediction. Charles E. Burchfield. Published by The Print Club of Cleveland. Lithograph, 1953. Image size 12 x 9" (304 x 229 mm). Edition 260. Signed in pencil.

Summer Benediction. Charles E. Burchfield. Published by The Print Club of Cleveland. Lithograph, 1953. Image size 12 x 9″ (304 x 229 mm). Edition 260. Signed in pencil.

“Well, I think that if this world lasts for a million years or two million years, or more, that never can you exhaust the subject matter of humanity or nature. It’s simply inexhaustible. I feel abut my own work, for example, my interest is more in nature now than in man-made things; I don’t know how much time I’ve got left, but I’d like to have at least another lifetime like I’ve had to say what I want to say about nature. I just don’t think I can ever get it said. There just isn’t time.”- Charles Burchfield (1893-1967)

We are in the last week of our exhibit Resonant Terrain. Stop by the gallery today or tomorrow to see this show of landscape-themed prints (including this particular Burchfield lithograph) before it comes down.

Quote from Oral history interview with Charles Burchfield, 1959 August 19, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Read the whole interview here.

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Abstract, Aquatint, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Mezzotint, Photo engraving, Prints

“Resonant Terrain” to open on April 17th

The Old Print Gallery is excited to announce its new print exhibit, Resonant Terrain, which will open on Friday April 17th, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. This exhibit of landscapes in print features work by both 20th century and contemporary printmakers, including Matt Brown, Margaret Patterson, Joseph Essig, Sylvie Covey, John Taylor Arms, and more. The selected works range from representational to abstract, depicting vistas, valleys, and views of our shared terrain. The show will remain on view until July 11th.

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4" (350 x 234 mm).

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4″ (350 x 234 mm).

The landscape has a long tradition in art, and Resonant Terrain explores how printmakers choose to depict the natural world through its evolution and transformation into the modern era. Although united in the theme of landscape, the works are realized through differing conceptual and methodical approaches. Some, like Robert Kipniss, use the velvety blacks and luminous whites of a mezzotint to infuse landscapes with a poetic melancholy and stillness- depicting a terrain seemingly untouched by the viewer or even the artist. Others, like Harry Wickey and Gerald Scheck, use the chaotic crosshatching of a drypoint needle or the unpredictable acidic bite of the aquatint to evoke the untamed, wild majesty of the natural world.

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4" (223 x 324 mm).

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4″ (223 x 324 mm).

Alone Again.  Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4" (497 x 550 mm).

Alone Again. Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4″ (497 x 550 mm).

As our landscapes evolve and modernize, so too do the artists’ tools and technologies, as shown in the methods of two contemporary printmakers selected for the exhibit. Nancy Previs crafts photopolymer plates from her own un-retouched photographs, documenting the life-force of the natural world found hidden within her increasingly urbanized home city of Dublin.  Using a similar photogravure process, Sylvie Covey transforms her own photographs into impressive, mammoth-sized prints of the vast Wyoming landscape.

Seen together, the prints selected for the show unveil the emotional power and pull of the natural world, a beauty and mystery that entraps and enchants artists, and serves as a deep pool of inspiration for their work.

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey.  Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8" (457 x 608 mm).

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey. Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8″ (457 x 608 mm).

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Abstract, Contemporary, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Mezzotint, Oil Painting, Pencil Drawing, Prints

Robert Kipniss. “Poetry of Art: Paintings, Drawings and Prints”

Forest murmurs. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2010. Image size 14 5/16 x 19 3/8" (363 x 493 mm). Edition 50.

Forest murmurs. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2010. Image size 14 5/16 x 19 3/8″ (363 x 493 mm). Edition 50.

Robert Kipniss.

Poetry of Art: Paintings, Drawings and Prints

Exhibition: October 18 through November 22, 2014.
Artist’s Reception: Thursday Night, October 23, 2014 4:30- 7pm

The Old Print Shop (our NYC partner gallery) is proud to present a new contemporary exhibit of over 30 recent works by Robert Kipniss. The exhibit opens today, and runs through late November. On view are paintings, prints, drawings, and poetry by this exceptional artist. Please make a point to stop by the NY gallery to see the show in person, or attend the Artist’s Reception next Thursday, October 23, from 4:30 to 7:00pm at the 152 Lexington Avenue gallery.

And on the Hill, Two Trees. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 30 x 40" (76.2 x 101.6 cm).

And on the Hill, Two Trees. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 30 x 40″ (76.2 x 101.6 cm).

Robert Kipniss – Painter, Printmaker, and Poet – was born in Brooklyn, NY, in 1931. In 1936, his family moved to Laurelton, New York, where he discovered the pleasure of being in the woods. His early love of the forest continues to this day in his images. He is often inviting the viewer into his private woods. In 1947, he took Saturday classes at the Art Students League and the next year he left for Wittenberg College (now University) in Springfield, Ohio. While at Wittenberg, he began to write poetry. By 1950, his passion was poetry, and he decided to major in literature and transferred to the University of Iowa. At the University of Iowa he took his first formal painting classes. In 1951 he entered a painting competition in New York City and was awarded his first one-artist show at the Joe Gans Gallery on 57th Street.  Kipniss has had over 180 one-artist shows since his first in 1951.

Window w/Curtain & Hill. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 36 x 25" (91.5 x 63.5 cm).

Window w/Curtain & Hill. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 36 x 25″ (91.5 x 63.5 cm).

In 1950, Kipniss made the decision that he was going to be a poet and a painter; however, life’s many turns often modify decisions made early in life. In 1961 he was working for the post office, painting, writing poetry, and supporting a family. Something had to give, so he made the decision to continue as a painter and support his family, which meant that he would stop writing poetry. The change was profound for his work to this day. His paintings and later his prints became poetic, mysterious, and inviting.

Trees, a composition. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2014. Image size 9 1/2 x 11 1/2" (235 x 295 mm). Edition 30.

Trees, a composition. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2014. Image size 9 1/2 x 11 1/2″ (235 x 295 mm). Edition 30.

He made his first prints, drypoints, in 1967. In 1968 he discovered lithography and connected to that form of printmaking for the next twenty-two years. Working with the master printers at George C. Miller in New York, he produced over 400 lithographic images. After Miller closed, he went back to intaglio, producing primarily mezzotints with an occasional drypoint.

Kipniss paintings and prints are in over seventy-five museums worldwide and many private collections. He is a member of the National Academy in New York, The Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers in London, The Society of American Graphic Artists, and the Century Association.

Eaves with Dark Window. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing on mylar, 1990. Image size 13 1/2 x 13 1/2" (343 x 343 mm).

Eaves with Dark Window. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing on mylar, 1990. Image size 13 1/2 x 13 1/2″ (343 x 343 mm).

Afternoon Breezes. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing, 2010. Image size 14 15/16 x 16 1/4" (380 x 420 mm).

Afternoon Breezes. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing, 2010. Image size 14 15/16 x 16 1/4″ (380 x 420 mm).

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Past/Present, Prints, Woodcut

Past/Present: Fall Foliage

Today we have a new Past/Present post to share, of beautiful fall foliage. With our mild- tempered fall, the trees in the the Washington area still have many of their vibrant and colorful leaves. It is a real joy to be surrounded by  trees that  are bursting with such color- rich reds, bright yellows, and lovely shades of deep green and orange fill up the horizon. We think these two prints, one by early 20th century woodcut master Gustave Baumann and the other by contemporary NY artist Richard Sloat, capture the beauty of this long fall season. Hope you enjoy!

Image on Left: The Sycamore. By Gustave Baumann. Woodcut, printed in color, 1920. An early impression, with solid border. Ed. 100/100.

Image on Right: Burning Autumn. By Richard Sloat. Etching, 1976. Ed. 63/125.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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