Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Landscapes, Prints, Screenprint, Serigraph, Silkscreen

Serigraphy

Serigraphy ( also known as screen-printing or silk screen) is a versatile printing process, based on the stencil principle. The method first appeared in China during the Song Dynasty (960–1279 AD), and gained popularity in 18th century Europe, thanks to imports of silk from the East. A group of WPA artists, who later formed the National Serigraphic Society, coined the word “serigraphy” in the 1930s in effort to differentiate the artistic application from the commercial printing application. Serigraphy was later made famous in the 1960s by Andy Warhol, who used the medium to achieve a bold, commercial look in his pop-icon prints.

To make a serigraph, a fine woven fabric is tightly stretched and attached to a metal or sturdy wood frame. This forms the printing screen. A stencil is then created on the screen, by the application of a blockout. Artists have experimented with numerous blockout methods over time- including paper, hand-cut film, glue, photosensitive emulsion, and gelatin film. The blockout areas become the non-image areas. After the blockout is laid and dried, paper is placed below the screen and thick ink is squeezed into a line across the top of the screen. The ink is then dragged along the surface of the screen with a squeegee. This forces the ink to pass through the open area of the stencil onto the paper below. For multi-colored prints, a separate screen is required for each color.

Below are several serigraph prints we have in our OPG inventory, by early 20th century and contemporary artists. Hope you enjoy!

Trio. Dorie Marder. Serigraph, 1945. Image size 14 7/8 x 10 7/8" (377 x 276 mm). Edition 45. LINK.

Trio. By Dorie Marder. Serigraph, 1945. Image size 14 7/8 x 10 7/8″ (377 x 276 mm). Edition 45. LINK.

Urban Views.  (Large) #6B. Patrick J. Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 6 x 6" (151 x 151 mm). Edition 12. LINK.

Urban Views. (Large) #6B.  By Patrick J. Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 6 x 6″ (151 x 151 mm). Edition 12. LINK.

Coastal Whimsey. Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2" (210 x 320 mm). Edition 55. LINK.

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2″ (210 x 320 mm). Edition 55. LINK.

Prairie Sunset. Allan Simpson. Serigraph, 1987. Image size 16 5/16 x 20 1/4" (416 x 514 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Prairie Sunset. By Allan Simpson. Serigraph, 1987. Image size 16 5/16 x 20 1/4″ (416 x 514 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Dancing. Thomas Seawell. Serigraph and archival digital, 2010. Tondo - diameter 9 1/2 x 9 1/2" (240 mm). Edition 10. LINK.

Dancing.  By Thomas Seawell. Serigraph and archival digital, 2010. Tondo – diameter 9 1/2 x 9 1/2″ (240 mm). Edition 10. LINK.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950.  8 5/8 x 12" (227 x 305 mm). LINK.

Space Planes.  By Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. 8 5/8 x 12″ (227 x 305 mm). LINK.

Pet. Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1967. Image size 2 3/4 x 2" (72 x 40 mm).  Edition 51. LINK.

Pet. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1967. Image size 2 3/4 x 2″ (72 x 40 mm). Edition 51. LINK.

Point Blank Distance. By Masaaki Noda. Serigraph, 1996. Image size 12 1/8 x 19 1/4" (308 x 488 mm). Edition 40. LINK.

Point Blank Distance. By Masaaki Noda. Serigraph, 1996. Image size 12 1/8 x 19 1/4″ (308 x 488 mm). Edition 40. LINK.

Hartling Bay. Richard T. Davis. Color serigraph, 1993. Image size 17 3/4 x 20 1/4" (445 x 509 mm). Edition 145. LINK.

Hartling Bay. By Richard T. Davis. Color serigraph, 1993. Image size 17 3/4 x 20 1/4″ (445 x 509 mm). Edition 145. LINK.

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Abstract, American Views, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, New Additions, Portraits, Prints, Serigraph

New Additions: 20th Century Printmakers Pt. 2

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing three more additions to our 20th century inventory- works by Irwin D. Hoffman, Morris A. Blackburn, and William C. McNulty. Read on below for information about the artists’ lives, travels, and studies. We also invite you to check out our yesterday’s post, a showcase of new prints by American printmakers John J.A. Murphy, Norma Bassett Hall, and Roi Partridge. Our inventory is constantly expanding and changing, especially in the field of 20th century and contemporary prints.


 Irwin D. Hoffman (1901- 1989)

Hoffman was born in East Boston, a son of Russian immigrant parents. He enrolled as a part-time student at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts at the very young age of 15, later attending the school as a full-time student on scholarship once he graduated from high school. His first solo show was at the age of 19 at Grace Horne Galleries, where he was reviewed by the press as “a prodigy in portraiture.” He was awarded the Paige Traveling Scholarship in 1924, prompting travels throughout Europe, where he studied the old masters of painting and was introduced to the new wave of European modern art. Returning from Europe, he opened a studio in New York City, a space he worked and lived in the rest of his career.

In the 1930s and 40s, Hoffman traveled extensively to the southwestern United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico, visiting his two brothers who owned a mining company and worked as prospectors. Much of his artistic output was a result of these travels- including portraits of the miners he befriended and etchings of the small mining communities he visited.

Mexican Miner. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1933. Edition unknown. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Mexican Miner. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1933. Edition unknown. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Miner at Rest. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1937. Edition 50. Signed and titled in pencil.  Second printing, c.1975. LINK.

Miner at Rest. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1937. Edition 50. Signed and titled in pencil. Second printing, c.1975. LINK.

 

 

 


Morris A. Blackburn (1902- 1979)

Born in Philadelphia, Blackburn studied at The Graphic Sketch Club and the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art, later continuing his education at The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Blackburn was one of the first artists to use silkscreen (serigraphs) for fine art prints in the early 1940s, a printmaking technique he learned in WWII doing war posters and camouflage.

Known for exploring traditional and new printmaking techniques, Blackburn’s early prints were compositions of flat, bright color, moving towards abstraction. In fact, Blackburn experimented with all different media, including pottery, murals, furniture construction, and painting. He also wrote extensive and highly descriptive diaries, which offer great insights into his life as an instructor at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, new techniques he had learned, and records of his art sales and exhibitions.

Blackburn won two Cresson Traveling Scholarships and the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. His travels to Vienna, London, and Paris introduced him to works by artists like Egon Schiele, Gustav Klimt, Turner, and Cezanne. He also studied printmaking at Stanley Hayter’s workshops at the Print Club, and the interactions with artist there were energizing and inspiring for the innovative Blackburn.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. LINK.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. LINK.


William C. McNulty (1889- 1963)

Born in Utah, McNulty studied at the Art Students League from 1908- 1909. McNulty began his artistic career as a newspaper artist and editorial cartoonist, working in Nebraska, Montana, and for several years at the Seattle Star under the pen name of VON-A. Encouraged to try his hand at etching by Joseph Pennell, McNulty became a talented printmaker, using New York City as his inspiration. He was exhibiting prints by 1927 and had prints included in the first International Exhibition of Etching organized by the Art Institute of Chicago in 1932. He taught illustration and composition at the Art Student League from 1931 to 1958, and simmer art school in Rockport, Massachusetts. Described as a “romantic realist” by a 1963 New York Times article, McNulty created prints of the city’s architecture and street life, all imbued with a sense of grandeur and resplendence. His later work was an eclectic mix of prints of circus performers, NYC dock scenes, pictures of bustling street markets, and experimentations with abstract, mosaic-like assemblages of interlocking flat shapes.

The Whirlpool. By William C. McNulty. Drypoint, 1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

The Whirlpool. By William C. McNulty. Drypoint, 1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

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