18th Century Prints, Americana, Mezzotint, Naval, New Additions, Portraits, Prints

New Additions: Hancock and Hopkins Portraits

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NEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing two portraits, recently added to our collection. Published only a year apart, these mezzotint engravings of John Hancock and Commodore Esek Hopkins depict key figures in the Revolutionary War. Information for each print is listed below. For more portraits or Revolutionary War prints and maps, visit our website or stop by our Georgetown gallery. We hope you enjoy these striking pieces of Americana.

The Hon.ble John Hancock. of Boston in New-England; President of the American Congress. By Littleford. London, Published as the Act directs 25 Octo.r 1775 by C. Shepherd. Mezzotint engraving, 1775. Image size 12 1/2 x 9 7/8" (318 x 251 mm). Overall is good condition, lower "C. Shepherd." publication line trimmed off. LINK.

The Hon.ble John Hancock. of Boston in New-England; President of the American Congress. By Littleford. London, Published as the Act directs 25 Octo.r 1775 by C. Shepherd. Mezzotint engraving, 1775. Image size 12 1/2 x 9 7/8″ (318 x 251 mm). Overall is good condition, lower “C. Shepherd.” publication line trimmed off. LINK.

John Hancock became involved in the Revolution as a result of his disagreements with English custom officials regarding his mercantile business in Boston. At the time of the Stamp Act and the Boston Massacre, he was an outspoken leader among patriots and held elected offices in both the Massachusetts Provincial Congress and the Continental Congress. His militant beliefs, as well as his position as president of the Continental Congress, made him newsworthy in both England and the colonies.

Numerous portraits were published on both sides of the ocean depicting this important Revolutionary figure. In his anxiety to distribute the first print depicting Hancock, the London print-seller Charles Shepherd issued a porthole portrait (the above print) of the great patriot after a painting by Littleford. The image bears a passable resemblance to Copley’s portrait of Hancock, but it is unlikely that Shepherd ever saw the painting in person, therefore it is more reasonable to assume that it was based on a verbal description. Shepherd published another portrait of Hancock on the same day, which depicts him as a double-chinned gentleman holding a letter. This portraits bears even less resemblance to Copley’s portrait, therefore it is safe to conclude that Shepherd published both works without ever seeing a likeness of Hancock. This early print is one of the most important portraits of Hancock, and one of the rarest pieces of early Americana.

Commodore Hopkins, : Commander in Chief of the American Fleet. Publish'd as the Act directs 22, Augt. 1776, by Thos. Hart, London. Mezzotint, 1776. Image size 12 9/16 x 9 1/8" (319 x 232 mm). German edition. Good condition. 1/4 to 3/4" margins, which is unusual for mezzotints of this period. LINK.

Commodore Hopkins, : Commander in Chief of the American Fleet. Publish’d as the Act directs 22, Augt. 1776, by Thos. Hart, London. Mezzotint, 1776. Image size 12 9/16 x 9 1/8″ (319 x 232 mm). German edition. Good condition. 1/4 to 3/4″ margins, which is unusual for mezzotints of this period. LINK.

An attractive portrait of Commodore Hopkins, with two Continental ships shown in the background. The first Navy Jack, a flag with a rattlesnake on it bearing the motto “Don’t Tread on Me” (or in the case of this print, “Don’t tread upon me”), is shown at left and may have flown aboard the Alfred, flagship of the newly commissioned Continental fleet. At right flies the Pine Tree Flag, here titled “Liberty Tree An Appeal to God”.

Esek Hopkins was born in Rhode Island on April 26, 1718. As a young man he began a career at sea, captaining merchant vessels and, during the French and Indian War, acting as a successful privateer. After the American Revolution broke out in 1775, Rhode Island appointed Hopkins as commander of its military forces. Later that year he became Commander in Chief of the very small Continental Navy. In mid-February 1776, Commodore Hopkins sailed from Philadelphia under orders from the Continental Congress to attack British maritime forces in Virginia. Facing a British fleet much larger in numbers and better outfitted, Hopkins instead elected to continue sailing south to Nassau and protect his fledgling Navy of just eight merchant ships. On March 3rd, he seized Fort Montagu and then advanced to the poorly-defended town, executing the first amphibious warfare operation. His fleet seized all gunpowder and munitions- supplies desperately needed by the Continental Army. On April 4, 1776, while returning home, his Continental ships encountered and captured two small British warships, but then failed to capture the HMS Glasgow two days later. Hopkins’ conduct of his operations produced considerable controversy and he was dismissed by Congress in 1778. He served in the Rhode Island legislature until his death in 1802.

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Abstract, Aquatint, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Mezzotint, Photo engraving, Prints

“Resonant Terrain” to open on April 17th

The Old Print Gallery is excited to announce its new print exhibit, Resonant Terrain, which will open on Friday April 17th, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. This exhibit of landscapes in print features work by both 20th century and contemporary printmakers, including Matt Brown, Margaret Patterson, Joseph Essig, Sylvie Covey, John Taylor Arms, and more. The selected works range from representational to abstract, depicting vistas, valleys, and views of our shared terrain. The show will remain on view until July 11th.

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4" (350 x 234 mm).

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4″ (350 x 234 mm).

The landscape has a long tradition in art, and Resonant Terrain explores how printmakers choose to depict the natural world through its evolution and transformation into the modern era. Although united in the theme of landscape, the works are realized through differing conceptual and methodical approaches. Some, like Robert Kipniss, use the velvety blacks and luminous whites of a mezzotint to infuse landscapes with a poetic melancholy and stillness- depicting a terrain seemingly untouched by the viewer or even the artist. Others, like Harry Wickey and Gerald Scheck, use the chaotic crosshatching of a drypoint needle or the unpredictable acidic bite of the aquatint to evoke the untamed, wild majesty of the natural world.

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4" (223 x 324 mm).

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4″ (223 x 324 mm).

Alone Again.  Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4" (497 x 550 mm).

Alone Again. Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4″ (497 x 550 mm).

As our landscapes evolve and modernize, so too do the artists’ tools and technologies, as shown in the methods of two contemporary printmakers selected for the exhibit. Nancy Previs crafts photopolymer plates from her own un-retouched photographs, documenting the life-force of the natural world found hidden within her increasingly urbanized home city of Dublin.  Using a similar photogravure process, Sylvie Covey transforms her own photographs into impressive, mammoth-sized prints of the vast Wyoming landscape.

Seen together, the prints selected for the show unveil the emotional power and pull of the natural world, a beauty and mystery that entraps and enchants artists, and serves as a deep pool of inspiration for their work.

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey.  Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8" (457 x 608 mm).

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey. Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8″ (457 x 608 mm).

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Abstract, Contemporary, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Mezzotint, Oil Painting, Pencil Drawing, Prints

Robert Kipniss. “Poetry of Art: Paintings, Drawings and Prints”

Forest murmurs. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2010. Image size 14 5/16 x 19 3/8" (363 x 493 mm). Edition 50.

Forest murmurs. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2010. Image size 14 5/16 x 19 3/8″ (363 x 493 mm). Edition 50.

Robert Kipniss.

Poetry of Art: Paintings, Drawings and Prints

Exhibition: October 18 through November 22, 2014.
Artist’s Reception: Thursday Night, October 23, 2014 4:30- 7pm

The Old Print Shop (our NYC partner gallery) is proud to present a new contemporary exhibit of over 30 recent works by Robert Kipniss. The exhibit opens today, and runs through late November. On view are paintings, prints, drawings, and poetry by this exceptional artist. Please make a point to stop by the NY gallery to see the show in person, or attend the Artist’s Reception next Thursday, October 23, from 4:30 to 7:00pm at the 152 Lexington Avenue gallery.

And on the Hill, Two Trees. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 30 x 40" (76.2 x 101.6 cm).

And on the Hill, Two Trees. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 30 x 40″ (76.2 x 101.6 cm).

Robert Kipniss – Painter, Printmaker, and Poet – was born in Brooklyn, NY, in 1931. In 1936, his family moved to Laurelton, New York, where he discovered the pleasure of being in the woods. His early love of the forest continues to this day in his images. He is often inviting the viewer into his private woods. In 1947, he took Saturday classes at the Art Students League and the next year he left for Wittenberg College (now University) in Springfield, Ohio. While at Wittenberg, he began to write poetry. By 1950, his passion was poetry, and he decided to major in literature and transferred to the University of Iowa. At the University of Iowa he took his first formal painting classes. In 1951 he entered a painting competition in New York City and was awarded his first one-artist show at the Joe Gans Gallery on 57th Street.  Kipniss has had over 180 one-artist shows since his first in 1951.

Window w/Curtain & Hill. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 36 x 25" (91.5 x 63.5 cm).

Window w/Curtain & Hill. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 36 x 25″ (91.5 x 63.5 cm).

In 1950, Kipniss made the decision that he was going to be a poet and a painter; however, life’s many turns often modify decisions made early in life. In 1961 he was working for the post office, painting, writing poetry, and supporting a family. Something had to give, so he made the decision to continue as a painter and support his family, which meant that he would stop writing poetry. The change was profound for his work to this day. His paintings and later his prints became poetic, mysterious, and inviting.

Trees, a composition. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2014. Image size 9 1/2 x 11 1/2" (235 x 295 mm). Edition 30.

Trees, a composition. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2014. Image size 9 1/2 x 11 1/2″ (235 x 295 mm). Edition 30.

He made his first prints, drypoints, in 1967. In 1968 he discovered lithography and connected to that form of printmaking for the next twenty-two years. Working with the master printers at George C. Miller in New York, he produced over 400 lithographic images. After Miller closed, he went back to intaglio, producing primarily mezzotints with an occasional drypoint.

Kipniss paintings and prints are in over seventy-five museums worldwide and many private collections. He is a member of the National Academy in New York, The Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers in London, The Society of American Graphic Artists, and the Century Association.

Eaves with Dark Window. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing on mylar, 1990. Image size 13 1/2 x 13 1/2" (343 x 343 mm).

Eaves with Dark Window. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing on mylar, 1990. Image size 13 1/2 x 13 1/2″ (343 x 343 mm).

Afternoon Breezes. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing, 2010. Image size 14 15/16 x 16 1/4" (380 x 420 mm).

Afternoon Breezes. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing, 2010. Image size 14 15/16 x 16 1/4″ (380 x 420 mm).

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18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Chromolithograph, Engraving, Etching, Fashion, Lithograph, Mezzotint, Portraits, Prints, Science, Stipple

Ballooning Prints

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L'Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851.  Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783.  A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16" (47.4 x 67.1 cm). LINK.

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L’Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851. Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783. A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16″ (47.4 x 67.1 cm).

Of all the experimental and intellectual developments in the 18th century, none captivated both scientists and the general public more than balloon travel. Ballooning played an important part in early aeronautical development,  the limitless expanse of sky beckoning scientists with hopes of exploration, excitement, and inexhaustible possibility. The first trepidatious voyages were described in eager and precise detail, and often included maps and diagrams of scientific observations. Early etchings and engravings were also made to capture the discoveries and milestones made by the scientists, explorers, and daredevils who braved the air. Below are several of our ballooning prints, selected from both our Georgetown and New York galleries. Be sure to click on the links to see more for our inventory.

Details Geometriques de la Machine Aerostatique... Monsieur Jos. Montgolfier, le 19 June 1784. A Lyon chez Joubert fils, Graveur et Md. D'Estampes, G de rue Merciere. Etching, 1784. LINK.

Details Geometriques de la Machine Aerostatique… Monsieur Jos. Montgolfier, le 19 June 1784. A Lyon chez Joubert fils, Graveur et Md. D’Estampes, G de rue Merciere. Etching, 1784.

The first clearly recorded instance of a balloon carrying (human) passengers was built by the brothers Joseph-Michel and Jacques-Etienne Montgolfier in Annonay, France. These brothers came from a family of paper manufacturers and had noticed ash rising in paper fires, which led to their experiments with balloon travel. The Montgolfier brothers gave their first public demonstration of their invention on June 4, 1783. They stood on a circular platform attached to the bottom of the balloon and  hand-fed the fire through openings on either side of the balloon’s skirt. The balloon reached an altitude of at least 500 feet and traveled about 5½ miles before landing safely 25 minutes later.  Later that year, scientists Jacques Alexander Charles and Nicholas Louis Robert created the first gas-balloon, utilizing hydrogen to keep the balloon and basket afloat for a significantly longer period of time.  Within the next ten years, numerous daredevils risked the skies with the help of silk balloons, wicker baskets, and new concoctions of gas and flame.

By 1785, the first successful crossing of the English Channel was accomplished by French balloonist Jean-Pierre Blanchard and American John Jeffries, using a gas balloon. They started in Dover, but once they were positioned over the water, the balloon lost altitude. The pair feverishly tossed all items from the basket, including their clothes. They landed safely in France two hours later, in nothing but their underwear.

Mr. Vincent Lunardi Esquire. Stipple engraving, 1784. Oval size 4 3/4 x 4 " ( 122 x 102 mm). LINK.

Mr. Vincent Lunardi Esquire. Stipple engraving, 1784. Oval size 4 3/4 x 4 ” ( 122 x 102 mm).

Most of early balloon flight and exploration occurred in France, with backing provided by the Académie Royale des Sciences. England was slow to catch on to the ballooning phenomenon. The first manned balloon flight in England was by Signor Vincent Lunardi, an Italian, who ascended from Moorfields on September 15, 1784. His gas balloon was outfitted with wooden oars, with the intended purpose of directional control. Fueled by the fervor surrounding Lunardi’s first flight in London, ballooning finally became a veritable craze in England. Aeronauts became the some of the most talked about celebrities of the day, and tales of their exploits and adventures swept across Britain creating a national mania for the sport. Whereas ballooning had been popular on the Continent since Pilatre and Rozier’s first flight in a “Montgolfiere”, it was not until Lunardi’s daring flight that it gained popularity in England.

Exact Representation of the Grand Aerostatick Machine with which Mr. Lunardi ascended from the Artillery Ground Sep. 15 1784. Published by W. Wells, Sep. 28 1784, at No. 132, Fleet Street. Etching, handcolored,1784. Image size 12 x 8 3/4" (305 x 224 mm). LINK.

Exact Representation of the Grand Aerostatick Machine with which Mr. Lunardi ascended from the Artillery Ground Sep. 15 1784. Published by W. Wells, Sep. 28 1784, at No. 132, Fleet Street. Etching, handcolored,1784. Image size 12 x 8 3/4″ (305 x 224 mm).

James Sadler Esq. First English Aeronaut. By Benjamin Taylor. Published by B. Taylor, No. 7 Brewer St. Golden Sq., London. Stipple engraving, 1812. 5 1/2 x 6 1/4" (140 x 160 mm) plus title and margins. LINK.

James Sadler Esq. First English Aeronaut. By Benjamin Taylor. Published by B. Taylor, No. 7 Brewer St. Golden Sq., London. Stipple engraving, 1812. 5 1/2 x 6 1/4″ (140 x 160 mm) plus title and margins.

Nicknamed the “King of the Balloon”, James Sadler was considered the first English aeronaut. He made his first balloon ascent in 1784, the same years as Lunardi’s famous flight, flying from Oxford to the village of Woodeaton, six miles away. On October 7, 1811, he set a balloon speed record when he flew from Birmingham to Boston, Lincolnshire, in less than four hours. In 1812, he attempted to cross the Irish Sea, but failed, landing in the ocean near Anglesey where he was rescued by a passing fishing boat. Sadler is remembered as one of the pioneers of aeronautical exploration in Britain and his daring flights helped make ballooning a national pastime.

A view of the Balloon of Mr. Sadler's. : This Balloon Ascended with Mr. Sadler and Captain Paget of the Royal Navy : from the Mermaid Gardens at Hackney in Middlesex at three O'clock on Monday afternoon August the 12th 1811 and descended in a field. Engraving, c.1811. Image size 16 15/16 x 13 7/8" (415 x 354 mm). LINK.

A view of the Balloon of Mr. Sadler’s. : This Balloon Ascended with Mr. Sadler and Captain Paget of the Royal Navy : from the Mermaid Gardens at Hackney in Middlesex at three O’clock on Monday afternoon August the 12th 1811 and descended in a field. Engraving, c.1811. Image size 16 15/16 x 13 7/8″ (415 x 354 mm).

Part of the Balloon with which Mr. Sadler ascended from Dublin, Octr. 1, 1812. : passed over upwards 237 Miles by Water, and 40 by Land, and descended at Sea. Robert Havell, Jr. Aquatint and engraving handcolored, undated, c.1812. Image size 13 1/4 x 9 1/8" (337 x 230 mm).LINK.

Part of the Balloon with which Mr. Sadler ascended from Dublin, Octr. 1, 1812. : passed over upwards 237 Miles by Water, and 40 by Land, and descended at Sea. By Robert Havell, Jr. Aquatint and engraving handcolored, undated, c.1812. Image size 13 1/4 x 9 1/8″ (337 x 230 mm).

Charles Green was another celebrated English aeronaut, He was the first person to undertake an ascent in a balloon filled with carbureted hydrogen gas. Green made 526 ascents during the course of his daring career, many of which tested the boundaries of aeronautical aviation. An eccentric at heart, Green made an ascent off the back of his pony, a feat which won him a reputation as daredevil. He constructed the great Nassau balloon, in which he made his famous ascent from Vauxhall Gardens. In 1821, Green was the first aeronaut to demonstrate that coal-gas could be used to inflate balloons. Prior to this discovery, volatile hydrogen gas had been used which was extremely expensive and took up to two days to inflate a large balloon. Green also invented the guide-rope, which was used to regulate the ascent and descent of the balloon.

Mr. Charles Green, The Aeronaut. By John Hollins. Published by Hodgson & Graves, London. Mezzotint, 1838. Engraved by  G. T. Payne. 15 9/16 x 12 1/2" (395 x 317 mm) plus title and wide margins. LINK.

Mr. Charles Green, The Aeronaut. By John Hollins. Published by Hodgson & Graves, London. Mezzotint, 1838. Engraved by G. T. Payne. 15 9/16 x 12 1/2″ (395 x 317 mm) plus title and wide margins.

Ballooning became a significant part of popular culture. Spectators would gather to watch the balloons take off and land. Fashion houses drew inspiration from the lauded air explorers. The wealthy that could afford such luxuries would take trips in balloons. Once made maneuverable, balloons were even used by militaries. The first military use of a balloon occurred during the Battle of Fleures in 1784. The balloon L’Entrprenant was used by French Aerostatic Corps to watch the movements of the Coalition Army.

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L'Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851.  Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783.  A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16" (47.4 x 67.1 cm). LINK.

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L’Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851. Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783. A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16″ (47.4 x 67.1 cm).

The Ascension of Mr, and Mrs, Graham, in the Great Magnificent Balloon. Engraving, 1824. Printed below the image states "Mr. Graham, having announced that he would ascend yesterday from White Conduit House, Pentonville, in part for the benefit of the widow of the late unfortunate Mr. Harris, immense crowds occupied all the grounds in the vicinity at an early hour, and the Garden itself was filled with large numbers of paying visitors." Image size 13 1/4 x 8 1/2" (337 x 217 mm). LINK.

The Ascension of Mr, and Mrs, Graham, in the Great Magnificent Balloon. Engraving, 1824. Printed below the image states “Mr. Graham, having announced that he would ascend yesterday from White Conduit House, Pentonville, in part for the benefit of the widow of the late unfortunate Mr. Harris, immense crowds occupied all the grounds in the vicinity at an early hour, and the Garden itself was filled with large numbers of paying visitors.” Image size 13 1/4 x 8 1/2″ (337 x 217 mm).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bataille de Fleurus (26 Juin 1794). Engraving, hand-colored. c.1830. Pellerin & Co., imp-edit. Imagerie D'Epinal No.178.   Image depicts the French military with a balloon tethered in the backgrounds. Image size 7 7/8 x 12 15/16" (200 x 328 mm). LINK.

Bataille de Fleurus (26 Juin 1794). Engraving, hand-colored. c.1830. Pellerin & Co., imp-edit. Imagerie D’Epinal No.178. Image depicts the French military with a balloon tethered in the backgrounds. Image size 7 7/8 x 12 15/16″ (200 x 328 mm).

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Lithograph, Mezzotint, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Reclining Nude

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Today we have two beautiful nude prints, one by contemporary Bill Murphy and the other by 20th century painter and printmaker Alessandro Mastro-Valerio. Followers of the OPG Blog are already familiar with Alessandro Mastro-Valerio (we have featured his prints here, here, and here), but this is the first time we have showcased work by Bill Murphy.

Murphy was born in Staten Island in 1952.  He studied at The School of Visual Arts, The Art Students League, Pratt Graphic Center, and received an MFA from Vermont College.  He holds the rank of Professor of Visual Arts at Wagner College, Staten Island where he has taught since 1983. Murphy is a member of Audubon Artists, Print Club of Albany, and the Society of American Graphic Artists (SAGA).

A particularly poignant line from Murphy’s artist statement is a great illumination of what makes his prints so successful: “The aspect of picture-making which intrigues me the most is at the point where luck and intention meet – the crisscrossing of fate and accident on the way to finding a picture.” His nude lithograph is a perfect visual testament to his instinctive and liberated method; it is a very subtle print- not overworked or exhaustive in its line work. Similarly, Mastro-Valerio’s nude benefits from a softer and delicate touch. The sheets are a tumble of indistinguishable folds, and his use of line is sparse- with only subtle definitions to the curve of the hip, shoulders, and hands, leaving the face and background bathed in shadows.

We hope you enjoy these two beautiful prints!

Image on the Left: Repose. Alessandro Mastro-Valerio. Mezzotint, 1948. Edition of 20. Estate Signed. LINK.

Image on the Right: Reclining Nude. By Bill Murphy. Lithograph, 1988. Edition 10. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

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