Our Mixed Winter Show is now on view at The Old Print Gallery. Stop by our Georgetown shop to see these stunning original 20th century and contemporary prints.Mixed Winter Show

Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Openings, Prints

On View Now…

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Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Prints

Mixed Winter Show

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16" (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16″ (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

From November 20th through February 12th, the Old Print Gallery will display a new selection of prints from emerging and established printmakers, pulling from both our 20th century and contemporary print collection. This showcase of prints will exhibit a variety of printmaking techniques, and range from representational to abstract in theme. Just in time for the 2015 Holiday Season, this eclectic and impressive mix will have original artwork available at all price points, with prints desirable to the seasoned art collector as well as those looking to break into the market.

Selected Artists: Alexander Archipenko, Albert W. Barker, Philip Bennet, Matt Brown, Asa Cheffetz, Robert Cook, Michael Di Cerbo, Werner Drewes, Richard Florsheim, Eric Goldberg, Rockwell Kent, Richard Lubell, Heather McMordie, Frederick Mershimer, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Matt Phillips, Emilio Sanchez, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Benton Murdoch Spruance, and Lawrence N. Wilbur.

To see the prints included in the show, click here.

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4" (428 x 337 mm).

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4″ (428 x 337 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8" (428 x 327 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8″ (428 x 327 mm).

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4".

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4″.

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Color Linocut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Linocut, Prints

Linocuts

Broadway Moonlight. Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006.  Edition 50. Image size 10 x 8" (255 x 203 mm). LINK.

Broadway Moonlight. Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006. Edition 50. Image size 10 x 8″ (255 x 203 mm). LINK.

Linocut printmaking is a form of relief printing, using a linoleum block as a matrix. The artist sketches a composition on a block of linoleum, and then cuts away pieces from the surface with a chisel or gouge, leaving a raised area which will receive the ink. A roller is then used to apply ink to this raised surface, and the image is transferred to paper with a press or by hand burnishing and rubbing. Since the recessed cut-away areas do not receive ink, they appear white on the printed image.

The method matches that of a woodblock, but since the linoleum block does not have a directional wood grain, the surface of the print will have less texture and the artist has more freedom in the line work. The linoleum takes all types of lines, but it is suited to large designs with high contrasting tints. If an artist wants to incorporate multiple colors into the linocut, each color will be printed with its own carved linoleum block. The print is created by printing a sheet of paper with each of the blocks in turn, using a strict method of registration to avoid overlapping or misplacement. The greater the complexity, the greater the rate of failed or imperfect impressions.

Below are several of the linocuts we have in our 20th century and contemporary inventory. Stop by our Georgetown gallery to see the prints in person, and look at more linocuts!

Sea View. Stanley Kaplan. Linocut, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 17 5/8" (206 x 345 mm). LINK.

Sea View. Stanley Kaplan. Linocut, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 17 5/8″ (206 x 345 mm). LINK.

Carp.  Valenti Angelo. Color linocut, undated. Image size 6 1/4 x 8 3/4" (152 x 223 mm). LINK.

Carp. Valenti Angelo. Color linocut, undated. Image size 6 1/4 x 8 3/4″ (152 x 223 mm). LINK.

N. H. Bridge.  Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 1997. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 13" (210 x 330 mm). LINK.

N. H. Bridge. Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 1997. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 13″ (210 x 330 mm). LINK.

Studio Scene w/Doves. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1976. Image size 22 x 15 3/4" (560 x 400 mm). LINK.

Studio Scene w/Doves. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1976. Image size 22 x 15 3/4″ (560 x 400 mm). LINK.

El Juego. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007. Edition 3. Image size 17 3/4 x 11 7/8" (450 x 303 mm). LINK.

El Juego. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007. Edition 3. Image size 17 3/4 x 11 7/8″ (450 x 303 mm). LINK.

Division Street. Richard Sloat. Three-color linocut, 1995. Edition 50. Image size 7 1/8 x 13 7/8" (180 x 354 mm). LINK.

Division Street. Richard Sloat. Three-color linocut, 1995. Edition 50. Image size 7 1/8 x 13 7/8″ (180 x 354 mm). LINK.

Still Life with Top Hat & Dove in Cage. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1978. Image size 9 15/16 x 7 15/16" (252 x 202 mm). LINK.

Still Life with Top Hat & Dove in Cage. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1978. Image size 9 15/16 x 7 15/16″ (252 x 202 mm). LINK.

Vibrato II. Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006. Edition 25. Image size 12 x 18" (305 x 457 mm). LINK.

Vibrato II. Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006. Edition 25. Image size 12 x 18″ (305 x 457 mm). LINK.

Dusk at Baker's Beach.  [Massachusetts.]  Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006. Edition 50. Image size 3 7/8 x 5 7/8" (98 x 150 mm). LINK.

Dusk at Baker’s Beach. [Massachusetts.] Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006. Edition 50. Image size 3 7/8 x 5 7/8″ (98 x 150 mm). LINK.

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Contemporary, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Monoprint, Monotype, Prints

“Monotypes” to Open in July

Under a Tree. Matt Phillips. Monotype, 2006. Image size 12 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. LINK.

Under a Tree. Matt Phillips. Monotype, 2006. Image size 12 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. LINK.

We are excited to announce our new summer show, Monotypes, which will open on July 17th with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. A monotype is the most painterly method of printmaking, created by manually adding ink onto a plate, which is then printed through a traditional press. While other printmaking mediums are composed by way of hard, precise lines and detailed crosshatching, the looseness and gestural freedom allowed in a monotype can be an invigorating breath of fresh air for artists. The prints chosen for the exhibit are glowing examples of this unbridled, and sometimes playful, independence from the technical, benefiting from the simple swipe of a brush stroke, the pooling and blending of inks, and the unique translucency and saturation of color. The show will remain on view through September 12, 2015. Selected Artists: Linda Adato, Leonard Baskin, Philip Bennet, Susan Goldman, Takamune Ishiguro, Alessandro Mastro-Valerio, Matt Phillips, Clare Romano, Peri Schwartz, Bruce Waldman, Steven Walker, and Janet Yake. We will share more with our OPG Blog readers and followers as the show takes form, so make sure to check back for updates!

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Woodcut

Past/Present: Market Scene

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring market scenes, by contemporary artist Ellen Nathan Singer and 20th century printmaker Matt Phillips. These artists both use dramatic black lines to add depth and dimension to their prints, resulting in two strong, graphic prints. Phillips plays with diagonal shapes and lines to mimic the awnings of French street vendors, while Singer’s shapely barrels, boxes, and vases fill her engaging scene. We hope you enjoy this paring! As always, both prints are available for purchase, and can also be viewed in person at our Georgetown gallery, or online at our website.  Singer’s print, Autumn Market,  is currently in our Winter Contemporary Show, on view until February 9th.

Image on Left: Market Scene. By Matt Phillips. Lithograph, 1963. Edition of 12.

Image on Right: Autumn Market.  By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2009. Edition of 10.

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