Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Landscapes, Prints, Screenprint, Serigraph, Silkscreen

Serigraphy

Serigraphy ( also known as screen-printing or silk screen) is a versatile printing process, based on the stencil principle. The method first appeared in China during the Song Dynasty (960–1279 AD), and gained popularity in 18th century Europe, thanks to imports of silk from the East. A group of WPA artists, who later formed the National Serigraphic Society, coined the word “serigraphy” in the 1930s in effort to differentiate the artistic application from the commercial printing application. Serigraphy was later made famous in the 1960s by Andy Warhol, who used the medium to achieve a bold, commercial look in his pop-icon prints.

To make a serigraph, a fine woven fabric is tightly stretched and attached to a metal or sturdy wood frame. This forms the printing screen. A stencil is then created on the screen, by the application of a blockout. Artists have experimented with numerous blockout methods over time- including paper, hand-cut film, glue, photosensitive emulsion, and gelatin film. The blockout areas become the non-image areas. After the blockout is laid and dried, paper is placed below the screen and thick ink is squeezed into a line across the top of the screen. The ink is then dragged along the surface of the screen with a squeegee. This forces the ink to pass through the open area of the stencil onto the paper below. For multi-colored prints, a separate screen is required for each color.

Below are several serigraph prints we have in our OPG inventory, by early 20th century and contemporary artists. Hope you enjoy!

Trio. Dorie Marder. Serigraph, 1945. Image size 14 7/8 x 10 7/8" (377 x 276 mm). Edition 45. LINK.

Trio. By Dorie Marder. Serigraph, 1945. Image size 14 7/8 x 10 7/8″ (377 x 276 mm). Edition 45. LINK.

Urban Views.  (Large) #6B. Patrick J. Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 6 x 6" (151 x 151 mm). Edition 12. LINK.

Urban Views. (Large) #6B.  By Patrick J. Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 6 x 6″ (151 x 151 mm). Edition 12. LINK.

Coastal Whimsey. Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2" (210 x 320 mm). Edition 55. LINK.

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2″ (210 x 320 mm). Edition 55. LINK.

Prairie Sunset. Allan Simpson. Serigraph, 1987. Image size 16 5/16 x 20 1/4" (416 x 514 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Prairie Sunset. By Allan Simpson. Serigraph, 1987. Image size 16 5/16 x 20 1/4″ (416 x 514 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Dancing. Thomas Seawell. Serigraph and archival digital, 2010. Tondo - diameter 9 1/2 x 9 1/2" (240 mm). Edition 10. LINK.

Dancing.  By Thomas Seawell. Serigraph and archival digital, 2010. Tondo – diameter 9 1/2 x 9 1/2″ (240 mm). Edition 10. LINK.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950.  8 5/8 x 12" (227 x 305 mm). LINK.

Space Planes.  By Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. 8 5/8 x 12″ (227 x 305 mm). LINK.

Pet. Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1967. Image size 2 3/4 x 2" (72 x 40 mm).  Edition 51. LINK.

Pet. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1967. Image size 2 3/4 x 2″ (72 x 40 mm). Edition 51. LINK.

Point Blank Distance. By Masaaki Noda. Serigraph, 1996. Image size 12 1/8 x 19 1/4" (308 x 488 mm). Edition 40. LINK.

Point Blank Distance. By Masaaki Noda. Serigraph, 1996. Image size 12 1/8 x 19 1/4″ (308 x 488 mm). Edition 40. LINK.

Hartling Bay. Richard T. Davis. Color serigraph, 1993. Image size 17 3/4 x 20 1/4" (445 x 509 mm). Edition 145. LINK.

Hartling Bay. By Richard T. Davis. Color serigraph, 1993. Image size 17 3/4 x 20 1/4″ (445 x 509 mm). Edition 145. LINK.

Standard
Bronze, Drawing, Gallery Event, Gallery Openings, Sculpture, Steel

Artist Reception Today

ROBERT COOK and MASAAKI NODA Sculpture and Drawings

84797

Artist Reception & Opening Party 

Saturday, May 10, 2014

from 1:00- 4:00 pm

At the old print shop

84407

Standard
Bronze, Drawing, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Sculpture, Steel

Soaring into Three Dimensions

The Old Print Shop presents a show of SCULPTURE and DRAWINGS by Robert Cook and Masaaki Noda

May 10 – June 27

Opening Reception Saturday, May 10, from 1-4pm

Long-known as a prominent resource for prints and works on paper, our partner, The Old Print Shop in NYC, is expanding its repertoire with an exhibit of two artists, each notably accomplished in the discipline of sculpture. The street-level gallery, recently created to show contemporary art, has been further configured to accommodate this show.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Cook was born in Boston in 1921. He studied with George Demetrios, a classical sculptor. During WWII he served in Europe as an engineer making maps and models. After the war he stayed in Paris to study with Marcel Gaumont at L’Academie des Beaux Arts. In 1948 he moved to Rome. He is an innovator in the “lost wax” process of casting, creating larger sculptures than had previously been possible. He has a number of major public sculptures in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Saudi Arabia, Italy and Canberra, Australia. His work, “Dinoceras,” is in New York at Park Avenue and 51st Street. His works are in the Victoria and Albert Museum, The British Museum, the Hirshorn Collection, the Whitney Museum and the Mobile Museum of Art. He draws inspiration for his sculptures from dance, theater, sports and animals. Jazz music infuses his studio as he works.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995. Link.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995.

Masaaki Noda was born in Hiroshima, Japan, in 1949. He studied at Osaka University of Arts, and in 1977 he came to the United States and studied at The Art Students League. He pursues sculpture in a unique way, making paper and clay models until he has the exact design he is seeking. He has had numerous public installations in Japan, Greece, and China, including an exhibition of his work at the Shenzhen Museum of Art in China. His work is in numerous public collections including the Brooklyn Museum, Fukuyama Museum of Art in Japan, Hiroshima Perfectural Art Museum, Portland Art Museum, Philadelphia Museum of Art and Shenzhen Museum of Art. Masaaki draws inspiration from the artistic conflict between form and abstraction.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

For more information on this show, go to The Old Print Shop website: www.oldprintshop.com.

If you are in the New York area, we invite you to come and see the show. Both artists will be at the opening reception on Saturday, May 10th from 1 till 4 pm. Masaaki Noda will be there in person and Robert Cook will attend from Italy, via Skype.

Standard
2012 Holiday Gift Guide, Aquatint, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Lithograph, Monoprint, Monotype, Prints, Silkscreen, woodblock print, Woodcut

2012 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE: The Abstract Admirer

GIFT GUIDE BANNER copy

Abstract Admirer copyHere are our picks for the abstract admirer, who is drawn to artwork which takes some liberties, altering color and form to free itself from objective context. Reshaping the natural world for expressive purposes, abstract art is created through the  suggestive strokes of the monotype brush and free line of the etching needle. The abstract admirer revels in the freedom of shifting interpretations, seeing and feeling new things every time they look at their print. See our gift suggestions, taken from our early 20th century and contemporary collection, for the abstract admirer.  Enjoy!

Modernistic (for E.W.) Shifting Winds. By Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Signed in pencil, inscribed "65 -/6." $300.00

Modernistic (for E.W.) Shifting Winds. By Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Signed in pencil, inscribed “65 -/6.” $300.00

To Be Received Again. By Heather McMordie. Lithograph with collagraph, on Stonehenge paper, 2012. Titled and signed by artist in print.  Edition 2/6. $350.00

To Be Received Again. By Heather McMordie. Lithograph with collagraph, on Stonehenge paper, 2012. Titled and signed by artist in print. Edition 2/6. $350.00

Water 1. By Judy Mensch. Woodblock, 1998. Seven blocks, ten passes, eight colors.  Signed in pencil. Inscribed "3/3." $300.00

Water 1. By Judy Mensch. Woodblock, 1998. Seven blocks, ten passes, eight colors. Signed in pencil. Inscribed “3/3.” $300.00

Night Passage. By Richard Sloat. Etching and aquatint, 2008. Inscribed "2/70." $350.00

Night Passage. By Richard Sloat. Etching and aquatint, 2008. Inscribed “2/70.” $350.00

Sea Anemones. By Joan Krash. Solarplate etching, monoprint on Rives BFK paper, 2010. Inscribed "monoprint."  Framed by artist. $275.00.

Sea Anemones. By Joan Krash. Solarplate etching, monoprint on Rives BFK paper, 2010. Inscribed “monoprint.” Framed by artist. $275.00.

Head of a Traveler. By Adja Yunkers. Color woodcut, 1952. Signed, titled and dated in pencil. Inscribed "184/225." $1,200.00

Head of a Traveler. By Adja Yunkers. Color woodcut, 1952. Signed, titled and dated in pencil. Inscribed “184/225.” $1,200.00

Blur. By Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype, 2011. Inscribed "1/1." $550.00

Blur. By Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype, 2011. Inscribed “1/1.” $550.00

Fury. By Alessandro Mastro-Valerio. Aquatint, c.1952. Signed in pencil.  16/25. $200.00

Fury. By Alessandro Mastro-Valerio. Aquatint, c.1952. Signed in pencil. 16/25. $200.00

Line, Rope, Ladder - Alone. By Brad Widness. Etching, aquatint, drypoint, polymer image, chine colle on Sommerset Satin. Inscribed "A/P (unique)." $500.00

Line, Rope, Ladder – Alone. By Brad Widness. Etching, aquatint, drypoint, polymer image, chine colle on Sommerset Satin. Inscribed “A/P (unique).” $500.00

Far. By Masaaki Noda. Silk screen, 1986. Inscribed "85/98." $300.00.

Far. By Masaaki Noda. Silk screen, 1986. Inscribed “85/98.” $300.00.

Check back soon for more great gift ideas- for everyone on your list. To view other 2012 gift guides, see below:

All sales can be made in store or over the phone. We also ship prints and maps, flat and insured, using FedEx 3 Day Shipping. Our gallery hours are Tuesday-Saturday, from 10am to 5:20pm. The number at the gallery is (202) 965-1818.

Standard
Contemporary, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints

Winter Contemporary Show: Artist Statements

Our 2012 Winter Contemporary Show opens tonight– with a celebratory opening night party from 5-8pm at OPG (its free- so stop by and bring all of your friends!). We selected work by 22 different artists- hailing from all over the map- DC,  New York,  Ohio, even Japan. Below is a sneak preview of the show’s collection. I’ve also included excerpts from the printmakers’ artists statements. Although many of these works speak for themselves, it is always interesting to read how an artist conceptualizes his/her own work- what inspires, what processes they use, and so on. Enjoy!

Bruce Waldman- “I think of my work as dealing much more with the turbulence of my emotions than about technique, process, or any intellectual method or idea. I use the techniques that I have learned as tools only. Whether I am doing a figure, a landscape or still-life, I am viewing from inside my body; and usually the image is speaking more about my feelings than about the objects I’m depicting.”

Linda Adato- I start the image abstractly from the geometries of things around me, their configuration of line, form, shadow, etc. In the journey from drawing to final print, I do not so much execute the initial idea as I develop it in the course of the intaglio process. I am sometimes surprised by the “realistic” image.”

Takumune Ishiguro-To draw a picture is to express myself. The motif of my work comes from ‘Nature’ – vitality created from nature, hue, shape, air, smell, etc. It is not the motif created systematically, but the motif created naturally that is put on my canvas, not directly but through the filter of ‘myself’.  Etching has many attractive expressions such as lines or areas caused by corrosion and unplanned occurrences.  A completed work is a mirror of myself.

Masaaki Noda- I like to express the inner and outer worlds of nature for pictorial dynamism. They radiate energy and originate either from the tellurian or the celestial world: perpetual motion which embraces abstraction through the potential and momentum of its intrinsic energy of nature. 

Alan Petrulis-  “Technique has never been more than a means to an end for me. I have no compulsion to follow rules, show off my expertise, or do something new for its own sake. Having worked in many mediums both new and old I feel most comfortable creating simple line etchings by a method that has changed little over the past four hundred years. “

Richard Sloat– Woodcut and etching have been my field of creation. Both these forms of prints exude a visual clarity and depth of feeling. We, in viewing them, are tied into the visual world at an essential level, an affirmation of our own life’s journey.”

Robert Birmelin-  “It is not unusual to find that a relative or friend’s memory of a past event clashes with one’s own. Indeed, how often do two witnesses to the same crime contradict one another as to what really occurred? As an artist, I found myself seeking a visual structure that would be an active metaphor for such a state of mind – a structure continuous and spatially rich that initially seems to offer an uncomplicated, expected orientation and then self subverts, challenging the observer to recognize the claims of another equally visually insistent counter-reading. Our minds are restless, making choices, fluctuating between possibilities as we strive to interpret, to judge between contending truths. These paintings live in mid-thought, in the space of that uncertainty – an all too familiar space in a world of bewildering choice.”

Standard