19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Pencil Drawing, Photo engraving, Prints, Sporting, Watercolor, Wood, Woodcut

Print Round-Up: Bicycles

From the earliest depictions of penny farthings and velocipedes on dirt lanes, to modern-day prints of bike commuters navigating busy city streets, our prints celebrate and illustrate the convenience, athleticism, and joy of cycling.  Some of our historic prints show the bicycle in its earliest stages of development- with over-sized front wheels, or still lacking pedals or gears. They also highlight the beginnings of a strong “bike culture” in the 19th century. Many took to this popular form of transportation and amusement, going on long afternoon group rides or joining cycling clubs. We also have several great racing prints, showing fans at the velodrome, watching racers sprint around and around. Contemporary artists like Art Werger, Susan Pyzow, and Su-Li Hung have also depicted cyclists in their prints.

We hope you enjoy our bike print round-up, and we invite you to visit our Washington DC and New York City galleries to view these prints in person!

Tourists. By A. B. Frost. Published by Harper's Weekly. Photoengraving, hand colored, 1896. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2" (215 x 317 mm). AT OPG.

Tourists. By A. B. Frost. Published by Harper’s Weekly. Photoengraving, hand colored, 1896. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2″ (215 x 317 mm). AT OPG.

Six-Day Bike Race. BY Joseph W. Golinkin. Watercolor, c.1940. Image size 20 x 24" (508 x 610 mm). AT OPS.

Six-Day Bike Race. By Joseph W. Golinkin. Watercolor, c.1940. Image size 20 x 24″ (508 x 610 mm). AT OPS.

Bicyclist. By Susan Pyzow.  Etching, 2002. Image size 9 x 11 7/8" (225 x 300 mm). Edition 40. AT OPG.

Bicyclist. By Susan Pyzow. Etching, 2002. Image size 9 x 11 7/8″ (225 x 300 mm). Edition 40. AT OPG.

Cyclist Duo. By Richard Sloat. Etching, 2003. Image size 6 x 9 1/2" (152 x 240 mm). Edition 7. AT OPS.

Cyclist Duo. By Richard Sloat. Etching, 2003. Image size 6 x 9 1/2″ (152 x 240 mm). Edition 7. AT OPS.

Bike Lane, Queensborough Bridge. By Steven E. Walker. Woodcut, 2005. Image size 9 9/16 x 7 1/8" (243 x 180 mm). Edition 75. AT OPG.

Bike Lane, Queensborough Bridge. By Steven E. Walker. Woodcut, 2005. Image size 9 9/16 x 7 1/8″ (243 x 180 mm). Edition 75. AT OPG.

A Velocipede of Fifty Years Ago. Published in Harper's Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, 1869. Image size 4 3/16 x 5 3/4" (105 x 146 mm). AT OPS.

A Velocipede of Fifty Years Ago. Published in Harper’s Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, 1869. Image size 4 3/16 x 5 3/4″ (105 x 146 mm). AT OPS.

Bicycle in America.  The Germantown Bicycle Club starting out for a Race. By W. P. Snyder. Published in Harper's Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, Feb. 7, 1880.  Image size 6 5/8 x 9 1/8" (168 x 231 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycle in America. The Germantown Bicycle Club starting out for a Race. By W. P. Snyder. Published in Harper’s Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, Feb. 7, 1880. Image size 6 5/8 x 9 1/8″ (168 x 231 mm). AT OPG.

A Tour Awheel. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper's Weekly. Photogravure, 1899. Image size 6 1/2 x 8 3/8" (164 x 211 mm). AT OPS.

A Tour Awheel. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper’s Weekly. Photogravure, 1899. Image size 6 1/2 x 8 3/8″ (164 x 211 mm). AT OPS.

Figure Study, Woman on Bicycle. By Martin Lewis. Pencil on paper, c.1935. Image size 7 x 3 1/8" (178 x 80 mm). AT OPS.

Figure Study, Woman on Bicycle. By Martin Lewis. Pencil on paper, c.1935. Image size 7 x 3 1/8″ (178 x 80 mm). AT OPS.

Bicycle. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 2007. Image size 11 3/4 x 12 1/4" (298 x 315 mm). Edition 50. AT OPS.

Bicycle. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 2007. Image size 11 3/4 x 12 1/4″ (298 x 315 mm). Edition 50. AT OPS.

Wheeling on Riverside Drive. BY T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, July 17, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8" (343 x 556 mm.) AT OPG.

Wheeling on Riverside Drive. By T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, July 17, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8″ (343 x 556 mm.) AT OPG.

The Velodrome de la Seine: The Grand-stand. By Georges Scott. Wood engraving, c.1880. Image size 12 1/4 x 19 5/8" (310 x 499 mm.) AT OPG.

The Velodrome de la Seine: The Grand-stand. By Georges Scott. Wood engraving, c.1880. Image size 12 1/4 x 19 5/8″ (310 x 499 mm.) AT OPG.

The Century Run. By Jay Hambidge. Published by Truth Company. Color photoengraving, 1897. Image size 11 x 17 7/8" (273 x 455 mm.). AT OPG.

The Century Run. By Jay Hambidge. Published by Truth Company. Color photoengraving, 1897. Image size 11 x 17 7/8″ (273 x 455 mm.). AT OPG.

Cycling in England - Down the Ripley Road. By Joseph Pennell. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York, Oct. 22, 1887. Wood engraving, hand colored, 1887. Image size  9 1/4 x 12 5/8" (236 x 325 mm). AT OPG.

Cycling in England – Down the Ripley Road. By Joseph Pennell. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York, Oct. 22, 1887. Wood engraving, hand colored, 1887. Image size 9 1/4 x 12 5/8″ (236 x 325 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycling on Riverside Drive, New York. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Photoengraving, hand colored, c. 1895. Image size 8 1/2 x 13 1/4" (214 x 339 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycling on Riverside Drive, New York. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Photoengraving, hand colored, c. 1895. Image size 8 1/2 x 13 1/4″ (214 x 339 mm). AT OPG.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Image size 13 1/8 x 9 3/16" (333 x 245 mm). Ed 25. AT OPG.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Image size 13 1/8 x 9 3/16″ (333 x 245 mm). Ed 25. AT OPG.

AT OPG= Print is located at The Old Print Gallery, 1220 31st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007. www.oldprintgallery.com  t: 202-965-1818

AT OPS= Print is located at The Old Print Shop, 150 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY, 10016. www.oldprintshop.com  t:212-683-3950

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American Views, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Rain

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two rainy day prints by Martin Lewis and Richard Florsheim. Martin Lewis was born on June 7, 1881 in Castlemaine, Australia. He was the second of eight children and he had a passion for drawing. At the age of fifteen he left home and traveled in New South Wales and New Zealand, working as a post hole digger and a merchant seaman before settling into a Bohemian community outside of Sidney. Two of his drawings were published in a radical Sydney newspaper, the Bulletin. He also studied with Julian Ashton at the Art Society’s School in Sydney. Ashton, a famous painter, was also one the first Australian artists to take up printmaking.

In 1900, Lewis left for the United States. His first known job after arriving in the United States was painting stage decorations for the McKinley Presidential Campaign of 1900. Little is known of his early years in this country; however, by 1909 he was living and working in New York City. With the exception of a few years, he spent the rest of his life in and around the city. His earliest etching dates from 1915 but shows a technical ability that suggests that he had been working in the medium for some time. During these early years, Lewis experimented with different intaglio processes including etching, aquatint, engraving, mezzotint, and drypoint.

In 1920, Lewis left for Japan, a turning point in his artistic career. He studied the art and culture of Japan. During his eighteen-month stay, he spent his time painting in both oil and watercolor. He did not work in printmaking again until 1925, when he produced a group of etchings and drypoints depicting Japan. These new prints led him several years later to produce many memorable images of New York City. The period of 1925 through 1935 was his most productive, during which he produced eighty-one of his one hundred and forty-eight known prints.

Richard Florsheim was active as a painter, sculptor and graphics artist in Chicago, Milwaukee, Provincetown, and Woodstock, New York. Florsheim was born in Chicago in 1916, to a very wealthy family. He spent his youth and early adulthood studying at the University of Chicago and in New York with artist Aaron Bohrod. His father paid for a lengthy European independent study, where Florsheim exhibited at Salon des Refusés, and the Musée du Jeu de Paume honored him by purchasing one of his paintings, Don Quixote.

Florsheim returned to Chicago in 1939, and began lithography in 1940, exhibiting at the Quest Gallery and working out of a studio on North Avenue. He then enlisted in the US Navy, active in the Pacific Theater as a cartographer. It was at this time that he also obtained patents for his radar plane-spotting technique.

After the war, he resumed his artistic career, exhibiting widely. He helped found the Artists’ League of the Midwest with Artists’ Equity Association of New York. He was assistant director of the Arts Center Association, 1951-52, and taught at the Layton School of Art in Milwaukee from 1949 to 1950, and the Contemporary Art Workshop in Chicago from 1952 to 1963. From 1965 to 1973, he was a board member of the Illinois Arts Council.  Florsheim was a member of the National Academy of Design, the Society of American Graphic Artists, the Provincetown Art Association, which he served as Trustee and Vice President from 1962 to 1971, and the Chicago Society of Artists.

Image on Right: Rain on Murray Hill.  By Martin Lewis. Drypoint, 1928. Recorded impressions 100.

Image on Left: City Rain. By Richard Florsheim. Published by The Associated American Artists. Lithograph, 1976. Edition of 250.

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19th Century Prints, Early 20th Century, Fashion, Lithograph, Past/Present, Pencil Drawing, Prints

Past/Present: Woman and Hat

past present logo copy

Today we  have a new Past/Present post for our blog readers, featuring two fashion prints. Although two different ages, one can only imagine the smartly-dressed woman shown in the 19th century print  catching the eye and sketching pencil of Martin Lewis years later. The similarities –  tightly curled hair, topped with a fashionable red hat- are too striking to ignore.

Image on Left: Un Fantaisie. Published by Jeannin, Place du Louvre, 20, Paris. Lithograph by Formentin & Co., after Compte Calix.  Lithograph, hand-colored, undated. 

Image on Right: Women with Red Hat. Martin Lewis.  Pencil with color crayon, c. 1930. Stamped on verso “Collection of Lucile Deming Lewis”.

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19th Century Prints, Contemporary, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Etching, Lithograph, Prints

Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day from the Old Print Gallery

Mexican Madonna.  (Mexican Mother.) By Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1944.

Mexican Madonna. (Mexican Mother.) By Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1944.

Mother & Child. Werner Drewes. Graphite on green paper, 1947.

Mother & Child.  By Werner Drewes. Graphite on green paper, 1947.

Madonna and Child. Thomas Handforth. Etching, c. 1928.

Madonna and Child. By Thomas Handforth. Etching, c. 1928.

Mother's Joy. Published by Currier & Ives, 125 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, c.1865.

Mother’s Joy. Published by Currier & Ives, 125 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, c.1865.

Greenland Mother Nursing Child. By Rockwell Kent. Lithograph, 1934.

Greenland Mother Nursing Child. By Rockwell Kent. Lithograph, 1934.

Mother and Child. Lily Harmon. Etching, c.1966.

Mother and Child. By Lily Harmon. Etching, c.1966.

Chleuh Mother. By Thomas Handforth. Etching, 1928.

Chleuh Mother. By Thomas Handforth. Etching, 1928.

Mother's Joy. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St., New York. Lithograph handcolored, undated.

Mother’s Joy. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St., New York. Lithograph handcolored, undated.

Japanese Mother and Child. Martin Lewis. Pencil drawing, undated c.1920.

Japanese Mother and Child. By Martin Lewis. Pencil drawing, undated c.1920.

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19th Century Prints, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Linocut, Prints

2012 IFPDA Print Fair

The 2012 IFPDA Print Fair kicks off tonight with its VIP Opening Night Preview. The fair will then open to the public tomorrow, Friday November 2, and continue until Sunday night. Unique among the world’s major art fairs for its focus on fine prints from all periods, exhibiting dealers are all members of the International Fine Print Dealers Association. Visitors to the fair have an unrivaled opportunity to view and acquire outstanding works across the diverse range of periods and specialties.

While the Fair is known among museum curators and major collectors for its rare and exceptional prints, excellent works can be found in all price ranges, including exciting new projects from today’s leading and emerging artists.

Our partners, The Old Print Shop, will be exhibiting at the fair. You can find them at Booth #100. Expect great prints at their booth, highlights include prints by Sybil Andrews, Diego Riviera, Childe F. Hasaam, Martin Lewis, along with works by very talented NY contemporary artists! Floor plans can be found here, along with a list of exhibitors.

FAIR DATES & TIMES

  • THURSDAY 11/01: VIP Reception 5 pm,  Opening Preview 6:30 – 9 pm
  • FRIDAY 11/02: Open 12 – 8 pm
  • SATURDAY 11/03: Open 12 – 8 pm
  • SUNDAY 11/04: Open 12 – 6 pm

To purchase tickets to the IFPDA fair, click here.

The Print Fair takes place at the historic Park Avenue Armory located on Park Avenue between 66th and 67th Streets in the heart of Manhattan’s elegant Upper East Side. Map and directions here.

 

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