19th Century Prints, Botanical, Color Woodcut, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Woodcut

Past/Present: Honeysuckle

past present logo copyToday we are happy to share a new Past/Present post, featuring two stunning honeysuckle prints. The older print is a scarce lithograph, with original hand color, from “Flora’s Dictionary,” by Mrs. E.W. Wirt of Virginia.  With a publication date of 1837, Mrs. Wirt’s book is one of the earliest colored botanical works published in America.  Rather than depicting a single flower, each plate shows a carefully selected grouping.  As Bennett notes, “The arrangements of flowers are beautifully balanced and the coloring is brilliant.”  (Bennett, “American Color Plate Books, 115).

The woodcut is by English woodcut artist Mayel Allington Royds (1874-1941). Royds grew up in Liverpool and turned down a scholarship at age of fifteen to the Royal Academy of London, in order to attend the Slade School of Art and study under the formidable Henry Tonks. After an apprenticeship in Paris working in the studio of Walter Sickert, Royds accepted a teaching post at the Havergal College in Toronto. She later returned to the UK to teach at the Edinburgh College of Art where she met three people integral to her artistic development and life: Samuel Peploe, a Scottish post-impressionist painter highly regarded for his mastery of color, Frank Morley Fletcher, under whose influence she took up Japanese color woodcuts, and her future husband, Scottish etcher E. S. Lumsden.

Together Lumsen and Royds traveled to Tibet and India, their experiences serving as inspiration for her later woodcuts, both in design and in the use of saturated, rich color. The scenes she created of India from 1920 to 1930s are some of her more renowned work. From 1930 to 1933, Royds created a series of flower prints, which utilized her bold color work and Japanese woodblock technique. These stunning compositions, including Honeysuckle, are now part of the permanent collection at the National Gallery of Scotland. Royds was a regular contributor to the Society of Scottish Artists, the Society of Artist Printers, and the Graver Printers in Colour, exhibited her work in Scotland, Manchester, and further abroad.

Hope you enjoy these two prints!

Image on the left: Honeysuckle, Coral Honeysuckle, Wild Honeysuckle, Hop. Plate XXIV.  From “Flora’s Dictionary,” by Mrs. E.W. Wirt of Virginia. Embellished by Mrs. Anna Smith. Published by Fielding Lucas, Jr., Baltimore. Lithograph, original hand color, 1837. Image size (vignette) 7 x 5″ (175 x 130 mm).

Image on the rightHoneysuckle. By Mabel A. Royds. Woodcut printed in color, 1935-38. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 6 /12″ (203 x 165 mm).

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American Views, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Landscapes, New Additions, Prints, Wood, woodblock print

New Additions: 20th Century Printmakers

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSThe Old Print Gallery has been exhibiting early and mid-20th century prints for seven years now- a (very exciting) result of joining forces with The Old Print Shop in 2006. In the past month, we have added prints by several new (to us) 20th century printmakers- which we are happy to share with the OPG blog readers today. Below is a sampling of  works by three new artists ( the other three artists will come in a later post). We hope you enjoy the new additions to our ever-growing collection of fine prints.


 John J.A. Murphy ( 1888-1967)

Murphy was an American  painter, wood engraver and book maker, who studied at Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Art Student League, and the London Central School of Art. He participated in the early 20th century revival of the woodblock print, often exploring religious and metaphysical subject matter. Murphy completed his major wood engraving print series “The Way of the Cross” in 1921, which featured 14 black and white prints on Japanese Paper. He also wrote poems to accompany many of his wood engravings.

Athletes. By John J. A. Murphy. Wood engraving, c.1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

Athletes. By John J. A. Murphy. Wood engraving, c.1930. Edition unknown. LINK.


Norma Bassett Hall (1889- 1957)

Norma Bassett Hall was a printmaker and painter, best known for her color woodcuts in the style of the Arts and Crafts movement- representational scenes of the West printed in strong color with dynamic contrast. Born in Oregon, Hall attended school at the Chicago Art Institute, before returning to Portland to set up her own studio. From Portland, she and her etcher husband traveled to a long list of destinations, including Kansas, France, Britain, Scotland, Virginia, and New Mexico. Hall’s early prints are all woodblocks printed with opaque oil-based inks. She later shifted to using water-based inks after meeting and studying with Japanese printmaking expert Mabel Royds in Scotland. Hall was one of the 10 artists that formed the Wichita-based print collective Prairie Print Makers, and the only female member. Always drawn to color, Hall’s landscapes sometimes employed as many as seven different blocks, all cut into her favorite hard cherry wood.

Autumn Road Santa Fe. Norma Bassett Hall. Color wood block, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist. LINK.

Autumn Road Santa Fe. Norma Bassett Hall. Color wood block, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist. LINK.

Laguna Skyline. [New Mexico.] By Norma Bassett Hall. Color woodblock, 1931. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Laguna Skyline. [New Mexico.] By Norma Bassett Hall. Color woodblock, 1931. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.


Roi Partridge (1888-1984)

Born in Centralia, a territory in Washington, Partridge spent his early artistic years in the Pacific Northwest- exploring nature and all Western scenery had to offer with a small group of fellow artists called the Triad (which consisted of Partridge, John Davidson Butler and Clare Shepard). In 1909, he moved to NY and studied a year at the National Academy of Design- his brief and only stint with art school. Traveling to Munich, and not able to afford formal art classes, he worked informally with the printmaker Brockhoff. It is during his time in Germany that he was first introduced to etching. Partridge then moved to Paris, where, again, in lieu of art school, he compulsively read art books and kept a diligent schedule of sketching Parisian architecture, scenes, and portraits. He also worked as a printmaker, under the guidance of friend and mentor Bertha Jaques, founder of the Chicago Society of Etchers.

In 1914, he returned to Seattle, where he worked until 1917, when he and his family moved to San Francisco. He taught at Mills College in California, and served as the first Director of the College’s art gallery. Upon returning from Europe, he almost exclusively printed scenes of nature. His circle of friends in California consisted of great artists Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Edward Weston- all were mesmerized by the beauty of their natural surroundings, trying hard to capture its essence in art.

On the Range. By Roi Partridge. Etching, 1932-33. Edition 63. Signed in plate lower right "Roi Partridge 1932-33." LINK.

On the Range. By Roi Partridge. Etching, 1932-33. Edition 63. Signed in plate lower right “Roi Partridge 1932-33.” LINK.

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Aquatint, Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Lithograph, Mezzotint, New Additions, Prints

New Additions

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NEW ADDITIONSWe have a whole handful of new prints in the gallery- by both contemporary and early 20th century artists. Here is a sneak peek of our newest inventory. To see more, stop by our Georgetown gallery. We have refreshed several of our stacks to showcase our recent additions. We hope you enjoy them!

Moonlight, Number One. By John Taylor Arms. Etching and aquatint printed in color, 1920.

Moonlight, Number One. By John Taylor Arms. Etching and aquatint printed in color, 1920.

Slow Train through Arkansas. By Thomas Hart Benton. Circulated by Associated American Artists. Lithograph, 1941.

Slow Train through Arkansas. By Thomas Hart Benton. Circulated by Associated American Artists. Lithograph, 1941.

Sun Dappled House.  [Savannah, Georgia.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Etching, 2008.

Sun Dappled House. [Savannah, Georgia.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Etching, 2008.

Laguna Veneta. By James McBey. Etching, 1926.

Laguna Veneta. By James McBey. Etching, 1926.

Forest nocturne II. By Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2000.

Forest nocturne II. By Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2000.

Trotting Along. By Alice P. Schafer. Color linoleum cut.

Trotting Along. By Alice P. Schafer. Color linoleum cut.

Boats and Gulls. By John W. Winkler. Etching, 1960.

Boats and Gulls. By John W. Winkler. Etching, 1960.

Greenland Courtship. By Rockwell Kent. Lithograph on zinc, 1934.

Greenland Courtship. By Rockwell Kent. Lithograph on zinc, 1934.

Honeysuckle. By Mabel A. Royds. Woodcut printed in color, 1935-38.

Honeysuckle. By Mabel A. Royds. Woodcut printed in color, 1935-38.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013.

Ryder House, Truro (after Hopper). By Mary Teichman. Color etching and aquatint, 2012.

Ryder House, Truro (after Hopper). By Mary Teichman. Color etching and aquatint, 2012.

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