Color Linocut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Linocut, Prints

Linocuts

Broadway Moonlight. Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006.  Edition 50. Image size 10 x 8" (255 x 203 mm). LINK.

Broadway Moonlight. Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006. Edition 50. Image size 10 x 8″ (255 x 203 mm). LINK.

Linocut printmaking is a form of relief printing, using a linoleum block as a matrix. The artist sketches a composition on a block of linoleum, and then cuts away pieces from the surface with a chisel or gouge, leaving a raised area which will receive the ink. A roller is then used to apply ink to this raised surface, and the image is transferred to paper with a press or by hand burnishing and rubbing. Since the recessed cut-away areas do not receive ink, they appear white on the printed image.

The method matches that of a woodblock, but since the linoleum block does not have a directional wood grain, the surface of the print will have less texture and the artist has more freedom in the line work. The linoleum takes all types of lines, but it is suited to large designs with high contrasting tints. If an artist wants to incorporate multiple colors into the linocut, each color will be printed with its own carved linoleum block. The print is created by printing a sheet of paper with each of the blocks in turn, using a strict method of registration to avoid overlapping or misplacement. The greater the complexity, the greater the rate of failed or imperfect impressions.

Below are several of the linocuts we have in our 20th century and contemporary inventory. Stop by our Georgetown gallery to see the prints in person, and look at more linocuts!

Sea View. Stanley Kaplan. Linocut, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 17 5/8" (206 x 345 mm). LINK.

Sea View. Stanley Kaplan. Linocut, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 17 5/8″ (206 x 345 mm). LINK.

Carp.  Valenti Angelo. Color linocut, undated. Image size 6 1/4 x 8 3/4" (152 x 223 mm). LINK.

Carp. Valenti Angelo. Color linocut, undated. Image size 6 1/4 x 8 3/4″ (152 x 223 mm). LINK.

N. H. Bridge.  Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 1997. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 13" (210 x 330 mm). LINK.

N. H. Bridge. Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 1997. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 13″ (210 x 330 mm). LINK.

Studio Scene w/Doves. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1976. Image size 22 x 15 3/4" (560 x 400 mm). LINK.

Studio Scene w/Doves. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1976. Image size 22 x 15 3/4″ (560 x 400 mm). LINK.

El Juego. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007. Edition 3. Image size 17 3/4 x 11 7/8" (450 x 303 mm). LINK.

El Juego. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007. Edition 3. Image size 17 3/4 x 11 7/8″ (450 x 303 mm). LINK.

Division Street. Richard Sloat. Three-color linocut, 1995. Edition 50. Image size 7 1/8 x 13 7/8" (180 x 354 mm). LINK.

Division Street. Richard Sloat. Three-color linocut, 1995. Edition 50. Image size 7 1/8 x 13 7/8″ (180 x 354 mm). LINK.

Still Life with Top Hat & Dove in Cage. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1978. Image size 9 15/16 x 7 15/16" (252 x 202 mm). LINK.

Still Life with Top Hat & Dove in Cage. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1978. Image size 9 15/16 x 7 15/16″ (252 x 202 mm). LINK.

Vibrato II. Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006. Edition 25. Image size 12 x 18" (305 x 457 mm). LINK.

Vibrato II. Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006. Edition 25. Image size 12 x 18″ (305 x 457 mm). LINK.

Dusk at Baker's Beach.  [Massachusetts.]  Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006. Edition 50. Image size 3 7/8 x 5 7/8" (98 x 150 mm). LINK.

Dusk at Baker’s Beach. [Massachusetts.] Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006. Edition 50. Image size 3 7/8 x 5 7/8″ (98 x 150 mm). LINK.

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American Views, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Genre, Landscapes, Linocut, Lithograph, Prints, Wood, Woodcut

Barbara Latham: Prints of the Southwest

Saturday Morning - Taos. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, c.1950. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16" (202 x 257 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Saturday Morning – Taos. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, c.1950. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16″ (202 x 257 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Born in Walpole, Massachusetts in 1896, artist and illustrator Barbara Latham grew up immersed in the world of science and art. She attended the Norwich Connecticut Art School, where her painting and illustration talent was nurtured and honed. In 1915, she continued her studies at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, graduating in 1919. As a young adult, Latham lived and worked in New York City, creating illustrations primarily for Norcross Publishing Company on Madison Avenue, but also had her work featured in Forum Magazine and the New York Times Sunday magazine. She spent one summer at the Art Students League summer program in Woodstock, New York, working with noted modernist painter Andrew Dasburg.

In 1925, Latham traveled to Taos, New Mexico, to gather material for illustrations and greeting cards. Immediately taken with the landscape, Latham created striking paintings and prints of New Mexico’s rose-colored deserts, open sky, jagged mesas, and rugged lands. She also explored and depicted the everyday life of the Taos Pueblo Indians, creating impressive genre scenes of the homes, markets, and bustling hubs of Taos.

It was also in Taos where she was introduced by friend Victor Higgins to a fellow New England painter and printmaker, Howard Cook. Latham and Cook married in 1927. The couple had a beautiful and nurturing relationship, and benefited from each other’s artistic exploration and success. Shortly after marrying, the newlywed couple began extensive traveling- visiting Mexico, Europe, the American South, and parts of the Northeast.

Taos Pueble. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, undated. Edition unknown. Image size 10 1/8 x 7 15/16"(258 x 201 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Taos Pueble. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, undated. Edition unknown. Image size 10 1/8 x 7 15/16″(258 x 201 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Taos Village with Pueblo Indians. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, 1932. Edition unknown. Image size 4 5/16 x 6 3/4" (111 x 171 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Taos Village with Pueblo Indians. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, 1932. Edition unknown. Image size 4 5/16 x 6 3/4″ (111 x 171 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

The Old Sink. By Barabara Latham. Wood engraving, c.1927. Edition unknown. Image size 9 x 7 3/16" (153 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. Inscribed "S Bush imp." LINK.

The Old Sink. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving, c.1927. Edition unknown. Image size 9 x 7 3/16″ (153 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. Inscribed “S Bush imp.” LINK.

In 1933, on Cook’s first Guggenheim fellowship, the couple relocated to the silver mining town on Taxco, Mexico. It was here that Latham collected imagery which later turned into scenes for her first children book, Pedro, Nina & Perrito (published by Harper & Brother, in 1939). Latham explored the beautiful landscape and spent time with the people of Taxco, documenting all of her impressions in journals and illustrations.

Nina, Pedro and Perrito. By Barbara Latham. Lithograph, c. 1935. Edition unknown. Image size 14 3/4 x 11 7/8" (248 x 307 mm). Very good condition. This image was illustrated in a children's book published in 1939 by Harper & Brother. LINK.

Nina, Pedro and Perrito. By Barbara Latham. Lithograph, c. 1935. Edition unknown. Image size 14 3/4 x 11 7/8″ (248 x 307 mm). Very good condition. This image was illustrated in a children’s book published in 1939 by Harper & Brother. LINK.

Our Mexican Kitchen. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving on pink paper, 1932-33. Image Size: 5 5/8 x 7 5/8" (143 x 194mm). Good condition, save for minor light discoloration. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Our Mexican Kitchen. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving on pink paper, 1932-33. Image Size: 5 5/8 x 7 5/8″ (143 x 194 mm). Good condition, save for minor light discoloration. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Latham drew recognition for her printmaking and illustrations, working in the mediums of lithographs, etchings, and starkly contrasted black-and-white woodcuts and wood engravings. In 1934, Latham had a one-person show at the Weyhe Gallery in New York, a gallery known for its active support of printmakers.

In the Park.  By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving,c.1937. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16" (203 x 253 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. Inscribed "To Ann" and "Imp." LINK.

In the Park. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving,c.1937. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16″ (203 x 253 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. Inscribed “To Ann” and “Imp.” LINK.

After more traveling, Latham and Cook moved again in 1938 to Talpa Ridge, New Mexico, which became their permanent home for the next 35 years. Here Latham experimented with semi-abstract egg tempera paintings, and oil and watercolor paintings of natural history subjects. She also ventured into textile and clothing design, creating intricate patterns and focusing on hand-dying all her own fabrics.

Latham is celebrated today for her depictions of the American southwest, both in paintings and print form. Her illustrations are in over 17 children’s books and many of her early greeting cards are collected to this day.

We invite our OPG Blog readers and collectors to visit both our New York store and our Georgetown store to see these prints in person.

Prints at The Old Print Gallery, Georgetown: Geraniums, The Old Sink

Prints at The Old Print Shop, New York CityIn The Park, Nina Pedro and Perrito, Our Mexican Kitchen, Saturday Morning- Taos, Taos Pueble, Taos Village with Pueblo Indians

Geraniums. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, date unknown. Edition unknown. Image size 6 x 7 3/16" (152 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Geraniums. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, date unknown. Edition unknown. Image size 6 x 7 3/16″ (152 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

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Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Linocut, Lithograph, Offset Lithograph, Prints, Woodcut

PER∙FORM to open in July

On the High Wire.  [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010.

On the High Wire. [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010.

PER∙FORM

We are very happy to announce our upcoming summer show, PER∙FORM, which opens on Friday, July 19, 2013. As always, there will be a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-8pm on that opening Friday. The show will stay up on the gallery walls until September 14, 2013.

PER∙FORM celebrates depictions of dancers, musicians, circus performers, and stars of the stage, and pulls from our inventory of both early 20th century and contemporary prints. Ranging from abstract to figurative, these compositions are ambitious and inventive in their attempt to capture sound, forms in movement, and the indefinable energy- both physical and emotional- that fuels and motivates performers.

Vibrato II. By Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006.

Vibrato II. By Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006.

Highlights include Stanley Kaplan’s Vibrato II, which uses multiple, repeated cuts into a linoleum matrix to mimic the quiver of its musical title and an original offset lithograph, circa 1938, that announces the arrival of Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey circus performers to 5th and Florida Avenue in Washington, DC. Another showstopper is Robert Riggs’ Drum Major. Completed in charcoal and red crayon, Riggs uses deft and simple line work to conjure up a musician who has given his whole body over to the performance- back arched and foot in mid stomp.

Untitled. [Drum Major]. By Robert Riggs. Charcoal & red crayon, c.1930.

Untitled. [Drum Major]. By Robert Riggs. Charcoal & red crayon, c.1930.

Several prints offer more intimate compositions- dancers hovering in the wings of a theater, a reserved and focused duo practicing for a recital. These serve as a nice contrast to scenes of rigorous athleticism and dramatic lighting mixing on center stage.  As such, this collection of prints not only showcases the spirit and emotive vitality of performers, but also draws attention to the diverse venues in which these performers execute their talent. Scenes are set under striped circus tents and red-curtained stages, as well as on subway platforms and city streets- proving that these printmakers were inspired by acts of performance both  practiced and spontaneous.

You said you had a Story?  (Sweet Smell of Success.). By Maya Hardin. Softground, 2002.

You said you had a Story? (Sweet Smell of Success.) By Maya Hardin. Softground, 2002.

Subway Dance. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color, finished by hand, 2007.

Subway Dance. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color, finished by hand, 2007.

Selected Artists: Abe Blashko, Central PTG and Illinois Co., Robert Cook, Joseph Essig, Eugene C. Fitsch, Thomas Handforth, Maya Hardin, Stanley Kaplan, Dorie Marder, Doel Reed, Robert Riggs, Arnold Ronnebeck, John Ross, Andree Ruellan, Georges Schreiber, Thomas Seawell, Ellen Nathan Singer, John Sloan, Sam Swerdloff, and Bruce Waldman.

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey. Published by Central PTG. and Illinois. Co., Chicago, U.S.A. Offset lithograph, c. 1938.

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey. Published by Central PTG. and Illinois. Co., Chicago, U.S.A. Offset lithograph, c. 1938.

PER∙FORM on the OPG Website: click here.

PER∙FORM Press Release: click here.

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Aquatint, Color Linocut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Linocut, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Cellist

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two prints from our upcoming summer show, PER∙FORM. The older print is by Doel Reed (1894-1985), and was a special plate published in an edition of 100 prints by The Associated American Artists. Remembered as an important member of the Taos art community after 1960, Doel Reed achieved an international reputation as a landscape artist and printmaker, and as a master of aquatint. His later paintings and aquatints were earth-toned and geometric in style and featured architectural forms of the New Mexico landscape.The aquatint, however, is one of his earlier works, printed in 1946.

The contemporary print is a color linoleum cut by Stanley Kaplan. Kaplan was born in Brooklyn , in 1925. After graduating from the High School of Music and Art, he served two years in the United States Army during WWII. After the war he returned to school studying at Cooper Union and Pratt Institute. He taught art at Nassau Community College for thirty years and in 1978 created Tortoise Press, and subsequently self-published eight artist books. As an active artist since 1950, he has divided his time between wood carved murals, printmaking and artist books.

Image on Left: Evening Music. By Doel Reed. Published by The Associated American Artists. Aquatint, 1946. Edition of 100.

Image on Right: Cellist.  By Stanley Kaplan. Color linoleum cut, 2006. Edition of 25.

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Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Linocut, New Additions, Prints, Woodcut

New Additions: Ocean Night

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added a new print by Emily Trueblood to our inventory and website. It is a striking and beautiful print of the ocean at night, completed in color woodcut. Trueblood, while better known for her prints of New York City  architecture, is an avid swimmer and draws inspiration from her time in the water. She has produced several prints of waves, surfers, and swimmers over the years, and this new addition is a perfect complement to her previous water images. We hope you enjoy it! As always, you can view and purchase the print online or in our Georgetown shop.

Ocean Night 1. Emily Trueblood. Woodcut, 2012. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16" (202 x 256 mm). Edition 30. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $175.00.

Ocean Night 1. By Emily Trueblood. Woodcut, 2012. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16″ (202 x 256 mm). Edition 30. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $175.00.

Below are some of Trueblood’s other water-related prints:

Ocean Wave. by Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 2000. Image size 6 x 8" (150 x 200 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $150.00.

Ocean Wave. by Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 2000. Image size 6 x 8″ (150 x 200 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $150.00.

Ocean Bay at Night. By Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 1999. Image size 8 7/8 x 11 15/16" (226 x 303 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $200.00

Ocean Bay at Night. By Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 1999. Image size 8 7/8 x 11 15/16″ (226 x 303 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $200.00

Fast Start. By Emily Trueblood. Linocut, 2001. Image size 1 1/2 x 2 15/16" (38 x 68 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $125.00.

Fast Start. By Emily Trueblood. Linocut, 2001. Image size 1 1/2 x 2 15/16″ (38 x 68 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $125.00.

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