Contemporary, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Monoprint, Monotype, Prints

“Monotypes” to Open in July

Under a Tree. Matt Phillips. Monotype, 2006. Image size 12 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. LINK.

Under a Tree. Matt Phillips. Monotype, 2006. Image size 12 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. LINK.

We are excited to announce our new summer show, Monotypes, which will open on July 17th with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. A monotype is the most painterly method of printmaking, created by manually adding ink onto a plate, which is then printed through a traditional press. While other printmaking mediums are composed by way of hard, precise lines and detailed crosshatching, the looseness and gestural freedom allowed in a monotype can be an invigorating breath of fresh air for artists. The prints chosen for the exhibit are glowing examples of this unbridled, and sometimes playful, independence from the technical, benefiting from the simple swipe of a brush stroke, the pooling and blending of inks, and the unique translucency and saturation of color. The show will remain on view through September 12, 2015. Selected Artists: Linda Adato, Leonard Baskin, Philip Bennet, Susan Goldman, Takamune Ishiguro, Alessandro Mastro-Valerio, Matt Phillips, Clare Romano, Peri Schwartz, Bruce Waldman, Steven Walker, and Janet Yake. We will share more with our OPG Blog readers and followers as the show takes form, so make sure to check back for updates!

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Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Prints

Washington Post Review of “Tonal Array”

Marking Time. Linda Adato. Color etching and aquatint, 2000.  Ed 50. Image size 19 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches. LINK.

Marking Time. Linda Adato. Color etching and aquatint, 2000. Ed 50. Image size 19 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches. LINK.

Mark Jenkins, arts writer for The Washington Post, featured our current aquatint exhibit, Tonal Array, in his most recent column. Follow the link below to read his article, and make sure to stop by the gallery before April 11th to see the show in person.

Washington Post  3/27/15 review of Tonal Array

(Quick note: Our exhibit is the fourth show reviewed, so it does take some scrolling to get to the write up on Tonal Array).

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18th Century Prints, Aquatint, Color etching, Contemporary, Copperplate, Engraving, Etching, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Palaces

past present logo copyToday we are sharing two architecture prints. The oldest is from one of the finest architectural works of the German baroque period, Paul Decker’s Fürstliche Baumeister, oder Architectura Civilis. The work was published in Augsburg, Germany by Peter Detleffsen in 1711, and featured plates engraved by several master engravers of the time, including Bodenehr, Englebrecht, Probst and Kraus. They illustrate Decker’s designs for royal palaces and country houses, with details of their interior decoration, gateways, and gardens. In contrast to other architectural texts from the same period which focused heavily on theory and history, none of Decker’s plates were accompanied with text or elaborate descriptions. Rather, his work in Fürstliche Baumeister was created solely with the aristocratic architectural patrons of Central Europe in mind, in hopes to influence and inspire them while they built their palaces and grand estates.

The contemporary print is by Linda Adato, a master of color intaglio. The subject matter of her prints varies from the architecture of New York City, to the chambers and ancient ruins of Europe, to her own backyard. She “enjoy[s] exploring the geometry of the structures in these images and capturing the light at a certain moment or time of day,” always drawing attention to the balance between light and dark, hidden and seen. Adato’s work is distinctive for its delicate synthesis of composition, subtle use of color, and classical elegance. She has been making color etchings for over twenty-five years and is exceptionally skilled at “a la poupee”,  a one plate method of color printing where the colors are inked and wiped on the plate prior to printing.

Image on Top: Erste Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker. Copper engraving, 1711-1716. Published by Peter Detleffsen. Image size 14 3/4 x 14 7/8″. LINK.

Image on Bottom: The Palace. By Linda Adato. Color etching with aquatint and soft ground, 1993. Edition 19/75. Image size 23 3/4 x 15 3/4″. LINK. 

Erste   Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker.

Erste Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker. LINK.

The Palace. By Linda Adato. LINK.

The Palace. By Linda Adato. LINK.

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Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

Tonal Array: Aquatints from the 20th and 21st Century

Beyond the Silence (3) by Takamune Ishiguro. Aquatint, 2008. Image size 23 5/8 x 23 5/8" (600 x 601 mm). Edition 5. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. LINK.

Beyond the Silence (3) by Takamune Ishiguro. Aquatint, 2008. Image size 23 5/8 x 23 5/8″ (600 x 601 mm). Edition 5. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil.

We are very excited to announce our new upcoming show, Tonal Array: Aquatints from the 20th and 21st Century, which will open on Friday, February 20, 2015 with an opening reception from 5-7 pm at the gallery. The show will continue until April 11, 2015.

Aquatint is an etching technique that creates areas of tone through the use of a powdered or ground resin that is sprinkled on a metal plate prior to being bitten by etching acid. Although primarily used in the 18th and 19th centuries as a medium to reproduce the delicate fluidity and transparency of watercolors and paintings, the aquatint survived as an artist’s medium because of its atmospheric effects and flat wash properties. Tonal Array draws attention to the talented printmakers of the 20th and 21st century who experimented and pushed the boundaries of aquatint’s potential. Varying between flat color planes and incredible plate texture, as well as dramatic areas of light and dark, these artists demonstrate a fluid and experimental handling of the medium. The resulting images have an expressive strength and visual intensity that relays the ingenuity to be found in the world of original printmaking.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, John Taylor Arms, Letterio Calapai, Frank Cassara, Joseph Essig, Eric Goldberg, Takamune Ishiguro, Chaim Koppelman, Richard Lubell, Mary Manusos, Frederick Mershimer, Charles F. Mielatz, Jake Muirhead, Merle Perlmutter, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Richard Sloat, Mayumi Takagi, and Henry Ziegler.

Check back soon for more information about the show, about the rich history of aquatints, as well as more show images!

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American Views, Citiscapes, Color Lithograph, Contemporary, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Foreign Views, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Lithograph, Prints, Serigraph

Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print

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The Shadow of Brooklyn Bridge. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, 1988. Ed. 100. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its summer 2014 show, Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print. This group show of 19 printmakers spans over 90 years of creative expression, with prints by 20th century American masters John Taylor Arms, Martin Lewis, and Armin Landeck coupled with works by cutting-edge, contemporary printmakers. Form, Light, Line opens on Friday, June 20, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-8pm. The show will remain on view until September 13, 2014.

Artists have long found beauty in the strength, durability, and utility of architecture. Form, Light, Line allows viewers to experience the familiar composition of buildings through the artist’s eye- to visually explore how surface captures light, how windows both reveal and reflect, and how dimensional spaces can be flattened and abstracted into planes of light and dark.

(From Left to Right:) Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2B. Urban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003.

From Left to Right: Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2BUrban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003. LINK.

Highlights include a trio of black and white graphic serigraphs by Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms’ meticulous 1927 etching Lace in Stone, Rouen Cathedral, and a 1929 study for a large watercolor, Spiral Staircase, from the Martin Lewis estate. This pen and ink representation of the Queensboro Bridge is a delicate exploration of space and shading. Also on view is an Armin Landek 1941 engraving Rooftop, with accompanying annotated pen and pencil study for the print. The pair reveals the artist’s approach to perspective, as well as sketches of specific architectural elements, like moldings and chimneys.

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A Bronx Street Corner. By Martin Lewis. Pencil drawing, c.1946. LINK.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms, William Behnken, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Joan Drew, Richard Haas, Su-Li Hung, Sidney Hurwitz, Armin Landeck, Martin Levine, Martin Lewis, Frederick Mershimer, John Ross, Emilio Sanchez, Art Werger, Steven Yamin, and Alex Zwarenstein.

To see all the prints selected for Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print, please visit our website.

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