Early 20th Century, Etching, Figurative, Portraits, Prints

Opening this Friday…

20th Century People

preview the exhibit

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Aquatint, Charcoal Drawing, Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Drawing, Etching, Figurative, Lithograph, Pencil Drawing, Prints, Watercolor

“20th Century People” to Open in September

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown.  Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8" (257 x 302 mm). LINK.

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown. Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8″. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery’s new fall show, 20th Century People, will open on Friday, September 18th, with an opening reception from 5-7pm. The exhibit is a compendium of “people in prints” by some of the most celebrated 20th century American printmakers. Working and creating in a time when the art world was pushing towards abstract expressionism and modernism, these print artists stayed rooted in a sort of inherent figural humanism. With an exquisite ability to convey emotion through the anatomy of the human figure, the artists used their pencils, woodblocks, and burins to capture an arresting gaze, a fleeting moment between individuals, people at work, at play, and deep in thought. Seen together, these prints offer a glimpse of 20th century America, while also reminding viewers of our shared human condition. The show will remain on view until November 14, 2015.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Selected Artists: Peggy Bacon, Albert W. Barker, Will Barnet, Leonard Baskin, Thomas Hart Benton, Isabel Bishop, Abe Blasko, Ernest Fiene, Emil Ganso, Gordon Grant, Marion Greenwood, Irwin D. Hoffman, Martin Lewis, Charles W. Locke, James Penney, Robert Riggs, John Sloan, Bruce Waldman, Max Weber, and Anders Zorn.

Click HERE to see the prints included in the show. 

Single Strap Hanger. ISabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4". LINK.

Single Strap Hanger. Isabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4″. LINK.

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Contemporary, Monoprint, Monotype, Portraits, Prints

Explaining Monoprints and Monotypes

As we prepare for the opening of our new gallery exhibit, Monotypes, we thought it useful to delve into the difference between a monotype and a monoprint for our blog readers and collectors. As their names imply, monotypes and monoprints are prints that have an edition of one. Often referred to interchangeably, these planographic techniques are actually quite different.

A monotype is made by drawing or painting a design in printing ink onto any smooth surface, then covering this matrix with paper and passing it through a press. The result, an exact reverse of the original drawing, is an original and unique monotype.

A monoprint is made by taking an already inked etched plate or carved woodblock and adding additional ink to the surface of the matrix. The matrix and paper are run through the press, creating a monoprint. This additional ink produces an impression different in appearance to a conventionally-printed impression from the same plate. Since it is virtually impossible to manipulate this extra ink twice the same way, every monoprint impression will be different.

To explain this further, take a look at the two portraits shown below. Elie Nadelman by Leonard Baskin is a monotype. The composition is created of solely ink manipulation on the plate- there are no etched or engraved lines delineating the profile. In contrast, the print Elizabethan by Irving Amen is a monoprint. Etched lines add contours to the face, eyes, and beard, while printing ink (applied not in the grooves of the etched plate lines but on the surface of the plate) adds color to areas like the cheeks, forehead, and background. If Irving Amen tried to create another impression of this print, he would not be able to mimic exactly the placement, intensity, or saturation of each color- which is what makes this print an monoprint and not a colored etching. There can only be one impression like this one.

Elie Nadelman. Leonard Baskin. Monotype, 1989. Image size  5 x 4 inches. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Elie Nadelman. Leonard Baskin. Monotype, 1989. Image size 5 x 4 inches. Signed and titled in pencil, . LINK.

Elizabethan. Irving Amen. Monoprint, 1964. Image size 17 9/16 x 13 13/16 inches.  Signed, titled and dated in pencil, inscribed "1/1" and "unique color." LINK.

Elizabethan. Irving Amen. Monoprint, 1964. Image size 17 9/16 x 13 13/16 inches. Signed, titled and dated in pencil, inscribed “1/1” and “unique color.” LINK.

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Contemporary, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Monoprint, Monotype, Prints

“Monotypes” to Open in July

Under a Tree. Matt Phillips. Monotype, 2006. Image size 12 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. LINK.

Under a Tree. Matt Phillips. Monotype, 2006. Image size 12 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. LINK.

We are excited to announce our new summer show, Monotypes, which will open on July 17th with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. A monotype is the most painterly method of printmaking, created by manually adding ink onto a plate, which is then printed through a traditional press. While other printmaking mediums are composed by way of hard, precise lines and detailed crosshatching, the looseness and gestural freedom allowed in a monotype can be an invigorating breath of fresh air for artists. The prints chosen for the exhibit are glowing examples of this unbridled, and sometimes playful, independence from the technical, benefiting from the simple swipe of a brush stroke, the pooling and blending of inks, and the unique translucency and saturation of color. The show will remain on view through September 12, 2015. Selected Artists: Linda Adato, Leonard Baskin, Philip Bennet, Susan Goldman, Takamune Ishiguro, Alessandro Mastro-Valerio, Matt Phillips, Clare Romano, Peri Schwartz, Bruce Waldman, Steven Walker, and Janet Yake. We will share more with our OPG Blog readers and followers as the show takes form, so make sure to check back for updates!

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