19th Century Prints, American Views, Chromolithograph, Collage, Contemporary, Landscapes, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Transfer print

Past/Present: Fall

Today is the first day of Fall, the autumnal equinox, “one of the two periods of the year when the sun crosses the equator and the days and nights are in equal length all over the earth” as explained by this article.  To celebrate this shift in seasons, we have a new Past/Present for you- two artists’ representations of autumn landscapes. The first is a 19th century depiction of the Starrucca Valley, located in Pennsylvania near Lanesboro. One of the few prints produced after a painting by Hudson River School artist Jasper Cropsey, this image was printed exclusively for members of the Crosby Opera House Art Association. We’ve paired it with a hand-colored transfer print and collage by contemporary printmaker Takayo Noda. We hope you enjoy these colorful celebrations of Fall!

Image on the top: American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. By Jasper Cropsey. Published by T. Sinclair’s Chromo Lith., Philadelphia. Lithographed by William Dresser. Chromolithograph, undated, c. 1870s. Image size 15 1/2 x 26 5/8″ (394 x 677 mm). LINK.

Image on the bottom : Autumn Day. By Takayo Noda. Transfer print, hand-colored, 2013. Three dimensional collage in areas. Signed, titled and inscribed “1/1.” Image size 6 7/8 x 9 5/8″ (175 x 243 mm). LINK.

American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. LINK.

American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. LINK.

Autumn Day. LINK.

Autumn Day. LINK.

 

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Charcoal, Early 20th Century, Landscapes, Lithograph, Portraits, Prints

Albert W. Barker (1874-1947)

Clouds. Albert W. Barker. Charcoal drawing, 1920. Image size 9 7/8 x 13 15/16" (252 x 355 mm). LINK.

Clouds. Albert W. Barker. Charcoal drawing, 1920. Image size 9 7/8 x 13 15/16″ (252 x 355 mm). LINK.

Today we are exploring the work of artist Albert W. Barker (1874-1947). A resident of Rose Valley, Barker’s scenes depict the farmlands of southeastern Pennsylvania through loss of farmland, early industrialization, and the Great Depression.

Barker was born on June 1, 1874 in Chicago.  In 1890, Barker began classes at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, where he studied charcoal drawings, as well as met his future wife Bess Morot. From 1903 to 1913 he taught at the School of Industrial Art in Philadelphia, before returning to study at the University of Pennsylvania. A lover of the classics and archaeology, in 1921, Barker received his Ph. D in Greek archaeology.

Barker’s first attempt at printmaking was etching, but he was unsatisfied with both the manner of image creation and his results. In 1926, Barker began collecting nineteenth century French lithographs; an infatuation with the medium quickly prompted him to try his hand at creating his own lithographs.  He studied with Bolton Brown, the master lithographer of the day, learning the subtleties of drawing on limestone and printing his own editions. He advanced quickly, and was soon writing essays and articles on the lithographic technique. In 1930, he published “Lithography for Artists.”

Barker’s early charcoals and lithographs are predominantly landscapes, sometimes dotted with barns or early farm equipment. By the mid-1930s, his prints include portraits of the farmers and workers of the land he loved so much. Not limited by his stark black and white palate, Barker instead filled his prints with atmosphere. The clouds reach and fill the outer limits of the print’s image, and with subtle gradation, his grassy hills stretch out in an unyielding expanse. Printing in a sort of monochromatic realism, his farm scenes show the strenuous, yet quiet life of his neighboring farmers. Barker’s prints are a tribute to the beauty of the Pennsylvanian landscape and the family farm in a time when he saw both slipping away, threatened by industrialization and the financial choke hold of the Depression.

Click here to see all available lithographs and original charcoals by Barker, currently in our gallery inventory.

Landscape (untitled).  Albert W. Barker. Charcoal drawing, 1905. Image size 13 7/8 x 9 1/2" (353 x 243 mm). LINK.

Landscape (untitled). Albert W. Barker. Charcoal drawing, 1905. Image size 13 7/8 x 9 1/2″ (353 x 243 mm). LINK.

Catskill Mountains, Nightfall. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1928. Image size 10 15/16 x 7 3/4" (278 x 197 mm). Edition 51. LINK.

Catskill Mountains, Nightfall. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1928. Image size 10 15/16 x 7 3/4″ (278 x 197 mm). Edition 51. LINK.

The Upper Meadow. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1929. Image size 7 13/16 x 11" (199 x 278 mm). Edition 76. LINK.

The Upper Meadow. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1929. Image size 7 13/16 x 11″ (199 x 278 mm). Edition 76. LINK.

Young Maples.  Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1929. Image size 10 13/16 x 7 3/8" (275 x 182 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Young Maples. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1929. Image size 10 13/16 x 7 3/8″ (275 x 182 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

The Stone Crusher. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 7 x 5" (177 x 127 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

The Stone Crusher. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 7 x 5″ (177 x 127 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

The Barn. Albert W.  Barker. Lithograph, 1930.  Image size 8 x 7 3/16" (203 x 182 mm). Edition 35. LINK.

The Barn. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 8 x 7 3/16″ (203 x 182 mm). Edition 35. LINK.

The Outlying Farm. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 4 3/4 x 6 7/8" (120 x 144 mm). Edition 100. LINK.

The Outlying Farm. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 4 3/4 x 6 7/8″ (120 x 144 mm). Edition 100. LINK.

The Sheep-house. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 9 13/16 x 6 9/16" (250 x 167 mm). Edition 35. Inscribed in stone lower right indistinctly "A. W. B." LINK.

The Sheep-house. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 9 13/16 x 6 9/16″ (250 x 167 mm). Edition 35. Inscribed in stone lower right indistinctly “A. W. B.” LINK.

Stony Pasture. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 11 x 7 7/8" (279 x 199 mm). Edition 35. LINK.

Stony Pasture. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 11 x 7 7/8″ (279 x 199 mm). Edition 35. LINK.

The Shop. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 11/16" (247 x 220 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

The Shop. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 11/16″ (247 x 220 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Churning.  2nd Stone. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1932. Image size 13 7/16 x 10 7/16" (341 x 265 mm). Edition 40. Inscribed in stone lower right "A.W.B. 1932." LINK.

Churning. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1932. Image size 13 7/16 x 10 7/16″ (341 x 265 mm). Edition 40. Inscribed in stone lower right “A.W.B. 1932.” LINK.

In the Day's Work.  Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1934. Image size 8 1/8 x 6" (206 x 152 mm). Edition 59. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

In the Day’s Work. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1934. Image size 8 1/8 x 6″ (206 x 152 mm). Edition 59. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

Stubble Fire. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1935. Image size 8 9/16 x 11 1/16" (217 x 293 mm). Edition 32. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

Stubble Fire. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1935. Image size 8 9/16 x 11 1/16″ (217 x 293 mm). Edition 32. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

Tenant House.  Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1937. Image size 4 5/16 x 6" (110 x 152 mm). Edition 50.  Printed on chine colle. LINK.

Tenant House. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1937. Image size 4 5/16 x 6″ (110 x 152 mm). Edition 50. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

The Enchanted Meadow. Albert W. Barker.  Lithograph, date unknown. Image size 6 3/4 x 9 13/16" (172 x 250 mm). Edition 70. Some impressions printed in sepia ink. LINK.

The Enchanted Meadow. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, date unknown. Image size 6 3/4 x 9 13/16″ (172 x 250 mm). Edition 70. Some impressions printed in sepia ink. LINK.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Prints

Charles Burchfield on Nature

Summer Benediction. Charles E. Burchfield. Published by The Print Club of Cleveland. Lithograph, 1953. Image size 12 x 9" (304 x 229 mm). Edition 260. Signed in pencil.

Summer Benediction. Charles E. Burchfield. Published by The Print Club of Cleveland. Lithograph, 1953. Image size 12 x 9″ (304 x 229 mm). Edition 260. Signed in pencil.

“Well, I think that if this world lasts for a million years or two million years, or more, that never can you exhaust the subject matter of humanity or nature. It’s simply inexhaustible. I feel abut my own work, for example, my interest is more in nature now than in man-made things; I don’t know how much time I’ve got left, but I’d like to have at least another lifetime like I’ve had to say what I want to say about nature. I just don’t think I can ever get it said. There just isn’t time.”- Charles Burchfield (1893-1967)

We are in the last week of our exhibit Resonant Terrain. Stop by the gallery today or tomorrow to see this show of landscape-themed prints (including this particular Burchfield lithograph) before it comes down.

Quote from Oral history interview with Charles Burchfield, 1959 August 19, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Read the whole interview here.

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18th Century Prints, Botanical, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Views, Landscapes, Prints

Volckamer Citrus Fruit Prints

Today we are sharing stunning 18th century engravings from Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” A wealthy Nuremberg merchant who had his own fine orangery, Johann C. Volckamer engaged a variety of artists and engravers, including the architectural artist Paul Decker, to produce plates for this distinctive work. Most of the plates are devoted to citrus fruits, bedecked with ribbon and positioned above views of the gardens, town squares, and palaces of Germany, Austria, and Italy. These unusual engravings are prized for their unique combination of botanical illustrations and 18th century garden designs.

Cedrato con fior e Sugo doppio. Page 174. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrato con fior e Sugo doppio. Page 174. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

In the 18th century, most European gardeners were moving away from ornamental gardens and towards practical gardening of vegetables, herbs, and fruits. Gardens in colder planting zones were enclosed against insects, vermin, and the chilly climate, gifting the gardeners an opportunity to grow and cultivate citrus fruit trees for the first time. While the culture of fruit was the subject of many books- gardeners manuals with instructions as to care and pruning were in abundance- there were comparatively few illustrated books dealing with fruit alone in the beginning of the century. Published in 1708, Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides” was one of the first illustrated books dedicated to citrus fruits.

Limon Cedrato. Page 68. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 68. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 162. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 162. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

The first volume of “Nurnbergische Hesperides” contained 115 plates, mostly uncolored. Separated into 5 parts, the book’s first four sections focus solely on citrus fruits, while the fifth is devoted to flowers. The plates were engraved by L. C. Glotsh, and were the work of artists P. Decker, B. Kinkel, and I. C. Steinberger.

A continuation, or second volume, of “Nurnbergische Hesperides” was published in 1714, with 132 plates. Again, the plates depict mostly citrus fruits, with the exception of the last section, which highlights pineapple, palm, and coconut trees.The plates were engraved by  J. C. Dehne and J. Montalegre, and were the work of artists Delsenbach, T. G. Beckh, Krieger, and F. P. Lidner.

Aranzo da Portugal. Page 194b. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Aranzo da Portugal. Page 194b. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Limon cornagione. Page 144a. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon cornagione. Page 144a. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedrati musciati. Page 61. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrati musciati. Page 61. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedro di fiore e Sugo doppia. Page 118. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedro di fiore e Sugo doppia. Page 118. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Lima Romana. Page 152. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Lima Romana. Page 152. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedrato Bergamotto. Page 52.  Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrato Bergamotto. Page 52. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

 

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Color etching, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Landscapes, Prints

“Resonant Terrain” Opens This Week!

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Resonant Terrain opens on Friday, April 17th, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. The prints selected for the show unveil the emotional power and pull of the natural world, a beauty and mystery that entraps and enchants artists, and serves as a deep pool of inspiration for their work. This exhibit of landscapes in print features work by both 20th century and contemporary printmakers and will remain on view until July 11th.

Selected Artists: Philip Bennet, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Matt Brown, Charles E. Burchfield, George E. Burr, Letterio Calapai, Sylvie Covey, Joseph Essig, Richard Florsheim, Emil Ganso, Maya Hardin, George Overbury “Pop” Hart, Peter Hurd, Robert Kipniss, Gene Kloss, Evan Lindquist, Donald Shaw MacLaughlan, Thomas W. Nason, Margaret J. Patterson, Nancy Previs, Gerald Scheck, Steven E. Walker, Levon West, and Harry Wickey.

To see the prints included in the show, click here. 

To read more about the show, click here.

Image Credit: Iceland Rocks I. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color and finished by hand, 2014. Image size 12 9/16 x 10 9/16 inches. Signed and titled in pencil. Edition 65. Inscribed “1/65.”

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