Abstract, Contemporary, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Mezzotint, Oil Painting, Pencil Drawing, Prints

Robert Kipniss. “Poetry of Art: Paintings, Drawings and Prints”

Forest murmurs. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2010. Image size 14 5/16 x 19 3/8" (363 x 493 mm). Edition 50.

Forest murmurs. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2010. Image size 14 5/16 x 19 3/8″ (363 x 493 mm). Edition 50.

Robert Kipniss.

Poetry of Art: Paintings, Drawings and Prints

Exhibition: October 18 through November 22, 2014.
Artist’s Reception: Thursday Night, October 23, 2014 4:30- 7pm

The Old Print Shop (our NYC partner gallery) is proud to present a new contemporary exhibit of over 30 recent works by Robert Kipniss. The exhibit opens today, and runs through late November. On view are paintings, prints, drawings, and poetry by this exceptional artist. Please make a point to stop by the NY gallery to see the show in person, or attend the Artist’s Reception next Thursday, October 23, from 4:30 to 7:00pm at the 152 Lexington Avenue gallery.

And on the Hill, Two Trees. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 30 x 40" (76.2 x 101.6 cm).

And on the Hill, Two Trees. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 30 x 40″ (76.2 x 101.6 cm).

Robert Kipniss – Painter, Printmaker, and Poet – was born in Brooklyn, NY, in 1931. In 1936, his family moved to Laurelton, New York, where he discovered the pleasure of being in the woods. His early love of the forest continues to this day in his images. He is often inviting the viewer into his private woods. In 1947, he took Saturday classes at the Art Students League and the next year he left for Wittenberg College (now University) in Springfield, Ohio. While at Wittenberg, he began to write poetry. By 1950, his passion was poetry, and he decided to major in literature and transferred to the University of Iowa. At the University of Iowa he took his first formal painting classes. In 1951 he entered a painting competition in New York City and was awarded his first one-artist show at the Joe Gans Gallery on 57th Street.  Kipniss has had over 180 one-artist shows since his first in 1951.

Window w/Curtain & Hill. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 36 x 25" (91.5 x 63.5 cm).

Window w/Curtain & Hill. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 36 x 25″ (91.5 x 63.5 cm).

In 1950, Kipniss made the decision that he was going to be a poet and a painter; however, life’s many turns often modify decisions made early in life. In 1961 he was working for the post office, painting, writing poetry, and supporting a family. Something had to give, so he made the decision to continue as a painter and support his family, which meant that he would stop writing poetry. The change was profound for his work to this day. His paintings and later his prints became poetic, mysterious, and inviting.

Trees, a composition. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2014. Image size 9 1/2 x 11 1/2" (235 x 295 mm). Edition 30.

Trees, a composition. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2014. Image size 9 1/2 x 11 1/2″ (235 x 295 mm). Edition 30.

He made his first prints, drypoints, in 1967. In 1968 he discovered lithography and connected to that form of printmaking for the next twenty-two years. Working with the master printers at George C. Miller in New York, he produced over 400 lithographic images. After Miller closed, he went back to intaglio, producing primarily mezzotints with an occasional drypoint.

Kipniss paintings and prints are in over seventy-five museums worldwide and many private collections. He is a member of the National Academy in New York, The Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers in London, The Society of American Graphic Artists, and the Century Association.

Eaves with Dark Window. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing on mylar, 1990. Image size 13 1/2 x 13 1/2" (343 x 343 mm).

Eaves with Dark Window. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing on mylar, 1990. Image size 13 1/2 x 13 1/2″ (343 x 343 mm).

Afternoon Breezes. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing, 2010. Image size 14 15/16 x 16 1/4" (380 x 420 mm).

Afternoon Breezes. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing, 2010. Image size 14 15/16 x 16 1/4″ (380 x 420 mm).

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16th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Maps, Natural History, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Portraits, Prints, White-line Woodcut, Wood, Woodcut

October 2014 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new October 2014 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog features a wide range of prints and maps from our collection, focusing on woodcuts and wood engravings.

We share 16th century woodcut maps, woodcut portraits from a scarce 18th century volume covering the discovery and exploration of America, and wood engravings from 19th century illustrator and artist Winslow Homer. The famous Fry-Jefferson map of Virginia can be found on page 6 and 7, and is supplemented with additional examples of great 18th century maps of North America. We highlight several striking Currier and Ives small folio landscapes and pair them with a breathtaking and exquisitely-colored impression of Landscape, Fruit and Flowers, published by the lithographic firm in 1862. We round out the catalog with a sampling of early 20th century and contemporary woodcuts, many of which are are featured in our current exhibition Ink & Grain.

Published in both traditional and digital media formats, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive during the holiday season. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the October Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3. Click to read here.

The Old Print Gallery Showcase.
October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3.
Click to read here.

We hope you enjoy it!

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American Views, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Genre, Landscapes, Linocut, Lithograph, Prints, Wood, Woodcut

Barbara Latham: Prints of the Southwest

Saturday Morning - Taos. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, c.1950. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16" (202 x 257 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Saturday Morning – Taos. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, c.1950. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16″ (202 x 257 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Born in Walpole, Massachusetts in 1896, artist and illustrator Barbara Latham grew up immersed in the world of science and art. She attended the Norwich Connecticut Art School, where her painting and illustration talent was nurtured and honed. In 1915, she continued her studies at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, graduating in 1919. As a young adult, Latham lived and worked in New York City, creating illustrations primarily for Norcross Publishing Company on Madison Avenue, but also had her work featured in Forum Magazine and the New York Times Sunday magazine. She spent one summer at the Art Students League summer program in Woodstock, New York, working with noted modernist painter Andrew Dasburg.

In 1925, Latham traveled to Taos, New Mexico, to gather material for illustrations and greeting cards. Immediately taken with the landscape, Latham created striking paintings and prints of New Mexico’s rose-colored deserts, open sky, jagged mesas, and rugged lands. She also explored and depicted the everyday life of the Taos Pueblo Indians, creating impressive genre scenes of the homes, markets, and bustling hubs of Taos.

It was also in Taos where she was introduced by friend Victor Higgins to a fellow New England painter and printmaker, Howard Cook. Latham and Cook married in 1927. The couple had a beautiful and nurturing relationship, and benefited from each other’s artistic exploration and success. Shortly after marrying, the newlywed couple began extensive traveling- visiting Mexico, Europe, the American South, and parts of the Northeast.

Taos Pueble. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, undated. Edition unknown. Image size 10 1/8 x 7 15/16"(258 x 201 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Taos Pueble. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, undated. Edition unknown. Image size 10 1/8 x 7 15/16″(258 x 201 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Taos Village with Pueblo Indians. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, 1932. Edition unknown. Image size 4 5/16 x 6 3/4" (111 x 171 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Taos Village with Pueblo Indians. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, 1932. Edition unknown. Image size 4 5/16 x 6 3/4″ (111 x 171 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

The Old Sink. By Barabara Latham. Wood engraving, c.1927. Edition unknown. Image size 9 x 7 3/16" (153 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. Inscribed "S Bush imp." LINK.

The Old Sink. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving, c.1927. Edition unknown. Image size 9 x 7 3/16″ (153 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. Inscribed “S Bush imp.” LINK.

In 1933, on Cook’s first Guggenheim fellowship, the couple relocated to the silver mining town on Taxco, Mexico. It was here that Latham collected imagery which later turned into scenes for her first children book, Pedro, Nina & Perrito (published by Harper & Brother, in 1939). Latham explored the beautiful landscape and spent time with the people of Taxco, documenting all of her impressions in journals and illustrations.

Nina, Pedro and Perrito. By Barbara Latham. Lithograph, c. 1935. Edition unknown. Image size 14 3/4 x 11 7/8" (248 x 307 mm). Very good condition. This image was illustrated in a children's book published in 1939 by Harper & Brother. LINK.

Nina, Pedro and Perrito. By Barbara Latham. Lithograph, c. 1935. Edition unknown. Image size 14 3/4 x 11 7/8″ (248 x 307 mm). Very good condition. This image was illustrated in a children’s book published in 1939 by Harper & Brother. LINK.

Our Mexican Kitchen. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving on pink paper, 1932-33. Image Size: 5 5/8 x 7 5/8" (143 x 194mm). Good condition, save for minor light discoloration. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Our Mexican Kitchen. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving on pink paper, 1932-33. Image Size: 5 5/8 x 7 5/8″ (143 x 194 mm). Good condition, save for minor light discoloration. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Latham drew recognition for her printmaking and illustrations, working in the mediums of lithographs, etchings, and starkly contrasted black-and-white woodcuts and wood engravings. In 1934, Latham had a one-person show at the Weyhe Gallery in New York, a gallery known for its active support of printmakers.

In the Park.  By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving,c.1937. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16" (203 x 253 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. Inscribed "To Ann" and "Imp." LINK.

In the Park. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving,c.1937. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16″ (203 x 253 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. Inscribed “To Ann” and “Imp.” LINK.

After more traveling, Latham and Cook moved again in 1938 to Talpa Ridge, New Mexico, which became their permanent home for the next 35 years. Here Latham experimented with semi-abstract egg tempera paintings, and oil and watercolor paintings of natural history subjects. She also ventured into textile and clothing design, creating intricate patterns and focusing on hand-dying all her own fabrics.

Latham is celebrated today for her depictions of the American southwest, both in paintings and print form. Her illustrations are in over 17 children’s books and many of her early greeting cards are collected to this day.

We invite our OPG Blog readers and collectors to visit both our New York store and our Georgetown store to see these prints in person.

Prints at The Old Print Gallery, Georgetown: Geraniums, The Old Sink

Prints at The Old Print Shop, New York CityIn The Park, Nina Pedro and Perrito, Our Mexican Kitchen, Saturday Morning- Taos, Taos Pueble, Taos Village with Pueblo Indians

Geraniums. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, date unknown. Edition unknown. Image size 6 x 7 3/16" (152 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Geraniums. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, date unknown. Edition unknown. Image size 6 x 7 3/16″ (152 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

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American Views, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Landscapes, New Additions, Prints, Wood, woodblock print

New Additions: 20th Century Printmakers

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSThe Old Print Gallery has been exhibiting early and mid-20th century prints for seven years now- a (very exciting) result of joining forces with The Old Print Shop in 2006. In the past month, we have added prints by several new (to us) 20th century printmakers- which we are happy to share with the OPG blog readers today. Below is a sampling of  works by three new artists ( the other three artists will come in a later post). We hope you enjoy the new additions to our ever-growing collection of fine prints.


 John J.A. Murphy ( 1888-1967)

Murphy was an American  painter, wood engraver and book maker, who studied at Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Art Student League, and the London Central School of Art. He participated in the early 20th century revival of the woodblock print, often exploring religious and metaphysical subject matter. Murphy completed his major wood engraving print series “The Way of the Cross” in 1921, which featured 14 black and white prints on Japanese Paper. He also wrote poems to accompany many of his wood engravings.

Athletes. By John J. A. Murphy. Wood engraving, c.1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

Athletes. By John J. A. Murphy. Wood engraving, c.1930. Edition unknown. LINK.


Norma Bassett Hall (1889- 1957)

Norma Bassett Hall was a printmaker and painter, best known for her color woodcuts in the style of the Arts and Crafts movement- representational scenes of the West printed in strong color with dynamic contrast. Born in Oregon, Hall attended school at the Chicago Art Institute, before returning to Portland to set up her own studio. From Portland, she and her etcher husband traveled to a long list of destinations, including Kansas, France, Britain, Scotland, Virginia, and New Mexico. Hall’s early prints are all woodblocks printed with opaque oil-based inks. She later shifted to using water-based inks after meeting and studying with Japanese printmaking expert Mabel Royds in Scotland. Hall was one of the 10 artists that formed the Wichita-based print collective Prairie Print Makers, and the only female member. Always drawn to color, Hall’s landscapes sometimes employed as many as seven different blocks, all cut into her favorite hard cherry wood.

Autumn Road Santa Fe. Norma Bassett Hall. Color wood block, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist. LINK.

Autumn Road Santa Fe. Norma Bassett Hall. Color wood block, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist. LINK.

Laguna Skyline. [New Mexico.] By Norma Bassett Hall. Color woodblock, 1931. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Laguna Skyline. [New Mexico.] By Norma Bassett Hall. Color woodblock, 1931. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.


Roi Partridge (1888-1984)

Born in Centralia, a territory in Washington, Partridge spent his early artistic years in the Pacific Northwest- exploring nature and all Western scenery had to offer with a small group of fellow artists called the Triad (which consisted of Partridge, John Davidson Butler and Clare Shepard). In 1909, he moved to NY and studied a year at the National Academy of Design- his brief and only stint with art school. Traveling to Munich, and not able to afford formal art classes, he worked informally with the printmaker Brockhoff. It is during his time in Germany that he was first introduced to etching. Partridge then moved to Paris, where, again, in lieu of art school, he compulsively read art books and kept a diligent schedule of sketching Parisian architecture, scenes, and portraits. He also worked as a printmaker, under the guidance of friend and mentor Bertha Jaques, founder of the Chicago Society of Etchers.

In 1914, he returned to Seattle, where he worked until 1917, when he and his family moved to San Francisco. He taught at Mills College in California, and served as the first Director of the College’s art gallery. Upon returning from Europe, he almost exclusively printed scenes of nature. His circle of friends in California consisted of great artists Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Edward Weston- all were mesmerized by the beauty of their natural surroundings, trying hard to capture its essence in art.

On the Range. By Roi Partridge. Etching, 1932-33. Edition 63. Signed in plate lower right "Roi Partridge 1932-33." LINK.

On the Range. By Roi Partridge. Etching, 1932-33. Edition 63. Signed in plate lower right “Roi Partridge 1932-33.” LINK.

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2014 Capital Art Fair This Weekend

CAF LOGOThe 2014 Capital Art Fair will take place in Arlington, VA, at the Holiday Inn-Rosslyn Westpark Hotel this weekend. We invite all our OPG blog readers and gallery friends to come to the fair, see our selection of great prints, and experience one of the best print fairs in the nation!

A successor to the Washington International Print Fair and the Washington Print Fair, the Capital Art Fair is now in its thirty-fourth year of bringing collectible and desirable art to the Washington, DC, area. This year, the fair boasts over 20 distinguished art dealers from across the United States (including The Old Print Gallery and our partners, The Old Print Shop).

Diana Cooper, Untitled (Double Blue), 2013, OG13DCO0969Visitors to the fair will find thousands of works on paper from great master prints to cutting edge, contemporary pieces. The original prints, paintings, drawings, and photographs span over 500 years of creative expression, offering an impressive and expansive selection to DC art collectors.

The Capital Art Fair presents an invaluable opportunity, both in access and convenience, to the seasoned art collector, as well as those looking to break into the market. It is the only art fair in the Washington, DC, area where an extraordinary range of fine art will be available for collectors, museums, and the curious to purchase. It also gives a chance for the vibrant DC art community to interact and talk with exhibitors and dealers who are highly respected in the field, many of whom are well known to the curators of DC museums and established members of the International Fine Print Dealers Association.

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Tickets to the 2014 Capital Art Fair can be bought at the fair for $10. OPG Blog readers can sign-up online for free admission. Feel free to invite friends, art-lovers, or collectors- the more the merrier!

Free Tickets

The fair hours are as listed below:

Saturday, April 5, 2014: 10 am – 6 pm

Sunday, April 6, 2014: 11 am – 5 pm

The Holiday Inn-Rosslyn Westpark Hotel is located at 1900 North Fort Meyer Drive, Alexandria, VA 22209. It is just over the Key Bridge from Georgetown and only one block away from the Rosslyn Metro stop on the Orange and Blue lines. The Fair is located in the Second Floor Ballroom.

small map

More information, including directions and a list of participating dealers, can be found at the Capital Art Fair website: http://www.capitalartprintfair.com/

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