Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Natural History, Prints

FEATHERED

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its new winter show, FEATHERED, which will open on February 19th and run through April 9th, 2016. FEATHERED will celebrate the beauty, power, and reverence of winged animals, captured in prints. Artists have been forever fascinated by birds and their ability to gracefully navigate the open skies on stretched wings, suspended between earth, sky, and water, hopping from perch to perch. FEATHERED showcases the work of three celebrated natural history and ornithological printmakers from the 20th century- Frank W. Benson, H. Emerson Tuttle, and Stow Wengenroth. Each artist offers a unique, distinctive approach to depicting birds is in their prints, which makes for a varied and compelling grouping on the wall.

The prints of Frank W. Benson (1862-1951), nicknamed the father of sporting art, suggest the perspective of a naturalist and bird hunter. His close and watchful examination of a bird’s flight path and tendencies in the water offer a firsthand record of nature, gleaned not from dead models in a studio, but from a close familiarity of birds in the wild. Captured in Benson’s spare compositions and delicate line work, their vital essence is expressed in the way the birds move through their environment- sunlight and shadows hitting their winged bodies in flight, ripples in water as ducks float through still marshes, traces of a whole flock of birds dotting the horizon.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

H. Emerson Tuttle (1890-1946), devoted much of his career to drawing and etching prints of birds, both from life, and using stuffed specimens in his studio. Arresting and commanding, his prints take on the appearance of formal seated portraits. Intricate detail is given to the patterns of feathers, the cock of the head, and oftentimes, the direct gaze of the bird. Tuttle’s prints are unswerving and full of personality- his birds take center stage and are only sometimes supported by a background. Tuttle captures their beauty and dynamism with his drypoint needle, imbuing his birds with almost human-like dispositions.

In contrast, Stow Wengenroth (1906-1978) is known for his landscapes, so his birds appear in their expected and rightful place, perched in mottled tree branches, exploring sand dunes, and in flight, weaving among shadows of trees. Birds play a principal part of his New England landscapes, adding movement and breathing life into his lithographic sceneries.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Landscapes, Prints

William J. Bennett

William James Bennett (1787-1844) was a British born painter and engraver, known for his series of birds-eye views of American cities and a series of large aquatints of Niagara Falls. Born in London, Bennett studied at the Royal Academy schools, working under Westall to develop his landscape skills. He spent his late teens and early twenties traveling with the British military, first to Egypt and Malta, followed by a later appointment in Italy. His travels expanded his landscape and portraiture skills, gifting an invaluable opportunity for the young artist to sketch both ancient ruins and modern cities and capture landscapes of all visual varieties.

In 1808, Bennett became a founding member of the Associated Artists in Water Colours, and worked out of London for a time. Bennett later moved to the United States in 1826 and was elected a full member of the National Academy of Design just two years later, in 1828. At the Academy he exhibited watercolor landscapes and seascapes as well as his engravings.

From 1830-1840, Bennett produced a series of aquatint topographical city views. Based off paintings of his own and the work of others, this series was immensely successful. In his views Bennett “not only celebrated the beauty of the American landscape, he also recorded the young nation’s growing urban centers, from Boston, Buffalo, and Detroit to New Orleans and Mobile, with a special focus on New York. Bennett recorded the bustling waterfront activity of thriving ports bathed in a luminous light that unified water, ships, and architecture. Capturing the optimism of the new nation, these magnificent aquatints have been regarded as the finest folio views of 19th-century American cities, which set the stage for an independent American school of city views.” (NYPL link). Bennett later painted four views of Niagara Falls, two which became subjects for his own aquatints, two which were translated into aquatints by fellow engraver John Hill.

Below are three prints we have by Bennett, a stunning view of Richmond, a harbor scene of Boston, and (of course) a beautiful view of the Navy Yard in Washington, DC. We hope you enjoy these prints- all three are still available to view and purchase in our Georgetown location!

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8". LINK.  One of the great views of the Nation's Capital. Washington is shown from the south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, est. 1799, behind is the original Capitol Building and to the left is the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8″. LINK.
One of the great views of the Nation’s Capital. Washington is shown from the bucolic south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, established in 1799. Behind is the original Capitol Building with the old dome. To the left sits the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Handcolored aquatint, 1833.  Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8".  LINK.  William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. One of the great views of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling and dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1833. Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8″. LINK.
William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. An attractive and colorful view of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling, dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By Goegre Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8". LINK. One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett's aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as "George Cooke's romantic celebration of Richmond's charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . ." Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor's mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8″. LINK.One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett’s aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as “George Cooke’s romantic celebration of Richmond’s charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . .” Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor’s mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe. REF: Deak 420; Stokes 1833 E-58.

 

 

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17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, 20th Century Maps, American Maps, Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Foreign Maps, Foreign Views, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Maps, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Pocket Maps, Prints, Sporting, World Maps

May 2015 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new May 2015 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog presents a wide range of prints and maps, at all price points. Highlights include Fritz Baedeker travel maps of popular cities and destinations, baseball scenes, college views, circus prints, Frederick Catherwood lithographs of ancient Mayan temples, and more! We have also feature several selections from our most recent aquatint show, Tonal Array, and our current landscape exhibit, Resonant Terrain.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in September. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the May Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.  Volume XXXVIII, Number 2.  May 2015. Click Here To Read!

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.
Volume XXXVIII, Number 2. May 2015.
Click Here To Read!

We hope you enjoy it!

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Abstract, Aquatint, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Mezzotint, Photo engraving, Prints

“Resonant Terrain” to open on April 17th

The Old Print Gallery is excited to announce its new print exhibit, Resonant Terrain, which will open on Friday April 17th, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. This exhibit of landscapes in print features work by both 20th century and contemporary printmakers, including Matt Brown, Margaret Patterson, Joseph Essig, Sylvie Covey, John Taylor Arms, and more. The selected works range from representational to abstract, depicting vistas, valleys, and views of our shared terrain. The show will remain on view until July 11th.

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4" (350 x 234 mm).

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4″ (350 x 234 mm).

The landscape has a long tradition in art, and Resonant Terrain explores how printmakers choose to depict the natural world through its evolution and transformation into the modern era. Although united in the theme of landscape, the works are realized through differing conceptual and methodical approaches. Some, like Robert Kipniss, use the velvety blacks and luminous whites of a mezzotint to infuse landscapes with a poetic melancholy and stillness- depicting a terrain seemingly untouched by the viewer or even the artist. Others, like Harry Wickey and Gerald Scheck, use the chaotic crosshatching of a drypoint needle or the unpredictable acidic bite of the aquatint to evoke the untamed, wild majesty of the natural world.

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4" (223 x 324 mm).

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4″ (223 x 324 mm).

Alone Again.  Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4" (497 x 550 mm).

Alone Again. Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4″ (497 x 550 mm).

As our landscapes evolve and modernize, so too do the artists’ tools and technologies, as shown in the methods of two contemporary printmakers selected for the exhibit. Nancy Previs crafts photopolymer plates from her own un-retouched photographs, documenting the life-force of the natural world found hidden within her increasingly urbanized home city of Dublin.  Using a similar photogravure process, Sylvie Covey transforms her own photographs into impressive, mammoth-sized prints of the vast Wyoming landscape.

Seen together, the prints selected for the show unveil the emotional power and pull of the natural world, a beauty and mystery that entraps and enchants artists, and serves as a deep pool of inspiration for their work.

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey.  Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8" (457 x 608 mm).

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey. Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8″ (457 x 608 mm).

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Contemporary, Gallery Opening Receptions, Landscapes, Photo intaglio, Photography, Prints

Nancy Previs

Harmonious Rhythm I. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/15. Image size 9 5/8 x 12”. LINK.

Harmonious Rhythm I. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/15. Image size 9 5/8 x 12”. LINK.

Today we are sharing the work of Nancy Previs, a newly signed printmaker from Dublin. Previs’s print, Harmonious Rhythm I, is in our 2014 Winter Contemporary Show, which opens tonight (!!!!) with an Opening Reception at the gallery from 5-8pm.

A fine art printmaker, Nancy Previs is also a photographer and sound recordist. She is drawn to capturing the essence and beauty of the natural world, specializing in photo intaglio. Her work has been exhibited in group shows in Dublin and the United States. In Northern Ireland, her work has been selected for inclusion in the Royal Ulster Academy’s Annual Exhibition. She is a member of Black Church Print Studio, Dublin and the Design and Crafts Council of Ireland. Among her qualifications, she holds undergraduate degrees from UMass, Amherst, The National College of Art and Design (NCAD), Dublin, and a masters degree in LIS from University College Dublin (UCD). Born and raised in Connecticut, Nancy Previs lives in Dublin, Ireland from where she makes regular trips to the US, most frequently to Washington DC and New York City.

Waiting. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed. 25. Image size 6 1/4 x 9”. LINK.

Waiting. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed. 25. Image size 6 1/4 x 9”. LINK.

 

Artist Statement: Inspired by the essence of energy around us – the life force of the landscape – she crafts photopolymer plates using her own un-retouched photographic images, creating traditional handmade multi-plate nature prints. Her images capture nature’s simple beauty – especially that found in open spaces, such as parks and fields, near water or high in the hills, around the island of Ireland and on the east coast of America.

Rockpool. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/20. Image 10 5/16 x 15 1/4'. LINK.

Rockpool. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/20. Image 10 5/16 x 15 1/4″. LINK.

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