Our Mixed Winter Show is now on view at The Old Print Gallery. Stop by our Georgetown shop to see these stunning original 20th century and contemporary prints.Mixed Winter Show

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Openings, Prints

On View Now…

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Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Prints

Mixed Winter Show

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16" (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16″ (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

From November 20th through February 12th, the Old Print Gallery will display a new selection of prints from emerging and established printmakers, pulling from both our 20th century and contemporary print collection. This showcase of prints will exhibit a variety of printmaking techniques, and range from representational to abstract in theme. Just in time for the 2015 Holiday Season, this eclectic and impressive mix will have original artwork available at all price points, with prints desirable to the seasoned art collector as well as those looking to break into the market.

Selected Artists: Alexander Archipenko, Albert W. Barker, Philip Bennet, Matt Brown, Asa Cheffetz, Robert Cook, Michael Di Cerbo, Werner Drewes, Richard Florsheim, Eric Goldberg, Rockwell Kent, Richard Lubell, Heather McMordie, Frederick Mershimer, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Matt Phillips, Emilio Sanchez, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Benton Murdoch Spruance, and Lawrence N. Wilbur.

To see the prints included in the show, click here.

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4" (428 x 337 mm).

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4″ (428 x 337 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8" (428 x 327 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8″ (428 x 327 mm).

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4".

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4″.

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Color Linocut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Linocut, Prints

Linocuts

Broadway Moonlight. Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006.  Edition 50. Image size 10 x 8" (255 x 203 mm). LINK.

Broadway Moonlight. Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006. Edition 50. Image size 10 x 8″ (255 x 203 mm). LINK.

Linocut printmaking is a form of relief printing, using a linoleum block as a matrix. The artist sketches a composition on a block of linoleum, and then cuts away pieces from the surface with a chisel or gouge, leaving a raised area which will receive the ink. A roller is then used to apply ink to this raised surface, and the image is transferred to paper with a press or by hand burnishing and rubbing. Since the recessed cut-away areas do not receive ink, they appear white on the printed image.

The method matches that of a woodblock, but since the linoleum block does not have a directional wood grain, the surface of the print will have less texture and the artist has more freedom in the line work. The linoleum takes all types of lines, but it is suited to large designs with high contrasting tints. If an artist wants to incorporate multiple colors into the linocut, each color will be printed with its own carved linoleum block. The print is created by printing a sheet of paper with each of the blocks in turn, using a strict method of registration to avoid overlapping or misplacement. The greater the complexity, the greater the rate of failed or imperfect impressions.

Below are several of the linocuts we have in our 20th century and contemporary inventory. Stop by our Georgetown gallery to see the prints in person, and look at more linocuts!

Sea View. Stanley Kaplan. Linocut, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 17 5/8" (206 x 345 mm). LINK.

Sea View. Stanley Kaplan. Linocut, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 17 5/8″ (206 x 345 mm). LINK.

Carp.  Valenti Angelo. Color linocut, undated. Image size 6 1/4 x 8 3/4" (152 x 223 mm). LINK.

Carp. Valenti Angelo. Color linocut, undated. Image size 6 1/4 x 8 3/4″ (152 x 223 mm). LINK.

N. H. Bridge.  Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 1997. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 13" (210 x 330 mm). LINK.

N. H. Bridge. Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 1997. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 13″ (210 x 330 mm). LINK.

Studio Scene w/Doves. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1976. Image size 22 x 15 3/4" (560 x 400 mm). LINK.

Studio Scene w/Doves. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1976. Image size 22 x 15 3/4″ (560 x 400 mm). LINK.

El Juego. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007. Edition 3. Image size 17 3/4 x 11 7/8" (450 x 303 mm). LINK.

El Juego. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007. Edition 3. Image size 17 3/4 x 11 7/8″ (450 x 303 mm). LINK.

Division Street. Richard Sloat. Three-color linocut, 1995. Edition 50. Image size 7 1/8 x 13 7/8" (180 x 354 mm). LINK.

Division Street. Richard Sloat. Three-color linocut, 1995. Edition 50. Image size 7 1/8 x 13 7/8″ (180 x 354 mm). LINK.

Still Life with Top Hat & Dove in Cage. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1978. Image size 9 15/16 x 7 15/16" (252 x 202 mm). LINK.

Still Life with Top Hat & Dove in Cage. Matt Phillips. Linocut, 1978. Image size 9 15/16 x 7 15/16″ (252 x 202 mm). LINK.

Vibrato II. Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006. Edition 25. Image size 12 x 18" (305 x 457 mm). LINK.

Vibrato II. Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006. Edition 25. Image size 12 x 18″ (305 x 457 mm). LINK.

Dusk at Baker's Beach.  [Massachusetts.]  Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006. Edition 50. Image size 3 7/8 x 5 7/8" (98 x 150 mm). LINK.

Dusk at Baker’s Beach. [Massachusetts.] Emily Trueblood. Three-block linocut, 2006. Edition 50. Image size 3 7/8 x 5 7/8″ (98 x 150 mm). LINK.

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Abstract, Aquatint, Collage, Contemporary, Figurative, Oil Painting, Prints, Woodcut

2013 Winter Contemporary Show

Moonrise Tide.  By Jake Muirhead. Softground and aquatint, 2013.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground and aquatint, 2013.

The Old Print Gallery’s 2013 Winter Contemporary Show will open on Friday, November 15, 2013 with a celebratory nighttime reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. Eleven different artists, who use printmaking as their primary medium for artistic expression, were selected for this show.  The works chosen resonate with skill and intention, and reflect the current eclecticism of contemporary printmaking. The show will remain on view until February 15, 2014.

Highlights include new works by local DC artists Jake Muirhead and Phillip Bennet. Muirhead’s large seascape, Moonrise Tide, offers evidence of the artist’s capable and deliberate draftsmanship. In his smaller still life, Bulb, Muirhead uses flowing delicate lines and subtle aquatint, resulting in a print that feels both intimate and fresh. Philip Bennet’s new abstract works are almost playful with their use of brilliantly saturated colors and suggestive titles, All Seeing Eyes and The First Day.

The First Day. By Philip Bennet. Acrylic painting on paper, 2012.

The First Day. By Philip Bennet. Acrylic painting on paper, 2012.

Sumo Kimono. By Pia Oste-Alexander. Collage, undated.

Sumo Kimono. By Pia Oste-Alexander. Collage, undated.

The 2013 Winter Contemporary Show also highlights several innovative approaches to printmaking. Pia Oste-Alexander’s Sumo Kimono is an artful assemblage of artist painted and printed paper, fabric and found patterns.  The gallery is also excited to showcase two prints from Heather McMordie’s 2013 series Not Made For Each Other. In Not Made For Each Other, woodblocks carved with independently derived imagery are printed on top of one another to create one image out of two. The blocks themselves are not made for use together, but with careful color selection and deliberate compositional choices, a cohesive image emerges. According to the artist, the prints “challenge the preconceived notions of what colors, shapes, and textures should or should not ‘work together’, and demonstrate the ability of an object to adapt in relation to another object.”

Not Made For Each Other V. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013.  *Photographed under glass.

Not Made For Each Other V. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013. *Photographed under glass.

Selected Artists: Philip Bennet, Eric Goldberg, Susan Goldman, Su-Li Hung, Heather McMordie, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Pia Oste-Alexander, Larry Welo, Art Werger, and Cleo Wilkinson.

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Aquatint, Color Linocut, Contemporary, Etching, Linocut, Prints

Karima Muyaes

Black & White. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

Black & White. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

We have two prints by Karima Muyaes gracing the walls of our RED exhibit- Cantos y Voces and Black and White- and her print Mujer de Cortze [Bark Woman] was featured in our last contemporary show. So suffice to say, we here at OPG are big fans of Muyaes and her work. Whether weaving ribbons of color around biomorphic shapes and symbols, or using radiating fine lines to compose her symmetrical black and white prints, Muyaes has mastered the art of composition. Her prints sample the patterns, colors, and symbolism found in her birthplace and current residence, Mexico City.

Cantos y Voces.  [Chants and voices.] By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Cantos y Voces. [Chants and voices.] By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Karima Muyaes was born in Mexico City, Mexico, in 1960. Her formal education began a the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), continued at the School of Fine Art at the Universidad de la Americans in Mexico City, and concluded at the School of Art in Toronto, Canada, where she specialized in printmaking at the storied “Open Studio.” Since 1981, Muyaes has exhibited her work in more than 30 individual “one-woman” museum and gallery shows and more than 50 group shows in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, the Czech Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Mexico. Exhibitions in Mexico City and Oaxaca include numerous prestigious galleries and museums: Museo de la Ciudad de Mexico, Galeria Casa Lamm, Museo Nacional de la Estampa, Universidad Anahuac.

Iluminacion. [Enlightment.] Karima Muyaes. Linocut, 2011.

Iluminacion. [Enlightenment.] Karima Muyaes. Linocut, 2011.

Plasma. Karima Muyaes. Linocut, 2011.

Plasma. Karima Muyaes. Linocut, 2011.

Muyaes has studied with a number of renowned international artists including Santos Balmoir, Juan Alcazar, and Curlee Holton. For over ten years, Muyaes has been an integral part of the internationally famous Experimental Printmaking Institute at Lafayette College, Easton, PA where she has participated in a number of avant-garde printmaking projects in association with artists from around the globe. Currently, she and her family live in Mexico City.

El Juego.  [The Game.] Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

El Juego. [The Game.] Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

Pareja.  [Couple.] Karima Muyaes. Etching and aquatint, 2000.

Pareja. [Couple.] Karima Muyaes. Etching and aquatint, 2000.

Chaman.  [Shaman.] Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

Chaman. [Shaman.] Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

 

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