American Views, Citiscapes, Color Lithograph, Contemporary, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Foreign Views, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Lithograph, Prints, Serigraph

Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print

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The Shadow of Brooklyn Bridge. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, 1988. Ed. 100. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its summer 2014 show, Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print. This group show of 19 printmakers spans over 90 years of creative expression, with prints by 20th century American masters John Taylor Arms, Martin Lewis, and Armin Landeck coupled with works by cutting-edge, contemporary printmakers. Form, Light, Line opens on Friday, June 20, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-8pm. The show will remain on view until September 13, 2014.

Artists have long found beauty in the strength, durability, and utility of architecture. Form, Light, Line allows viewers to experience the familiar composition of buildings through the artist’s eye- to visually explore how surface captures light, how windows both reveal and reflect, and how dimensional spaces can be flattened and abstracted into planes of light and dark.

(From Left to Right:) Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2B. Urban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003.

From Left to Right: Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2BUrban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003. LINK.

Highlights include a trio of black and white graphic serigraphs by Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms’ meticulous 1927 etching Lace in Stone, Rouen Cathedral, and a 1929 study for a large watercolor, Spiral Staircase, from the Martin Lewis estate. This pen and ink representation of the Queensboro Bridge is a delicate exploration of space and shading. Also on view is an Armin Landek 1941 engraving Rooftop, with accompanying annotated pen and pencil study for the print. The pair reveals the artist’s approach to perspective, as well as sketches of specific architectural elements, like moldings and chimneys.

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A Bronx Street Corner. By Martin Lewis. Pencil drawing, c.1946. LINK.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms, William Behnken, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Joan Drew, Richard Haas, Su-Li Hung, Sidney Hurwitz, Armin Landeck, Martin Levine, Martin Lewis, Frederick Mershimer, John Ross, Emilio Sanchez, Art Werger, Steven Yamin, and Alex Zwarenstein.

To see all the prints selected for Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print, please visit our website.

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Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Foreign Views, Prints, Woodcut

John Ross Color Woodcut Progression

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Brittany Harbor [Port Haliguen]. Progressive (series set of 6). Color woodcut, 1963. Edition 150. Image size 9 3/8 x 6 1/4″ (237 x 158 mm). Very good condition. Set of six.  The five different color block sheets are signed and titled “Progressive” in the lower margins . The finished impression, “Brittany Harbor” (seen at top right), is signed, titled and dated in pencil. LINK.

Today we have an intriguing print series to share with our OPG blog readers- which offers an insightful look into the creation of the color woodblock print “Brittany Harbor” by NY artist John Ross. This progressive series shows each of the five different colors and two different woodblocks needed to complete the print.

Woodblock printing is a type of relief printmaking. In this technique, the artist sketches a composition on a block of wood and then cuts away pieces from the surface. This leaves a raised area to receive ink. A roller (sometimes called a brayer) is then used to apply ink to the raised surface, and the image is then transferred to paper with a press or by hand burnishing and rubbing. Because the recessed, cut-away areas do not hold ink, they act as white-space on the printed image. Relief prints like woodcuts are usually characterized by bold dark-light contrasts and an impress into the paper of the inked lines.

Color woodcuts in particular are a result of inking one block in multiple colors to build up texture and create vibrance of color. Artists can also use more than one woodblock, each inked in a separate color, to create their composition. A sheet of paper is printed with each of the blocks in turn, using a method of registration to avoid misplacement or overlapping. The greater the complexity (number of woodblocks, number of different colors) of the print, the greater the chance for failed or imperfect impressions. For this reason, successful multi-block, multi-colored woodcuts are rare and a serious show of talent, finesse, and patience.

John Ross used two different woodcut blocks to create “Brittany Harbor”. First, the colors (dark blue, teal, green, and purple inks) are printed onto the paper. Each color is a separate pass through the press, but using the same wood block.

Dark purple ink. First block.

Dark blue ink. First block.

Teal ink. First Block.

Teal ink. First Block.

Green ink. First block.

Green ink. First block.

Purple ink. First block.

Purple ink. First block.

The second block, with finer and more intricate cuts, is then inked with a dark black ink and printed on top of the colored inks. This last block adds important details to the print, like bricks, roof texture, boat masts, and waves.

Black ink. Second block.

Black ink. Second block.

The resulting final image can be seen below.

Brittany Harbor.

Brittany Harbor.

 

An animation showing the block and color progression

An animation showing the block and color progression

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17th Century Prints, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Abstract, American Views, Americana, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Foreign Views, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Natural History, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Prints

May 2014 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new May 2014 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog features a wide range of prints related to architecture. Highlights include antique black and white engravings of architectural elements by Domenico de Rossi, compelling bird’s eye views of cities both foreign and domestic, as well as Gualtieri’s 1742 engravings of shells in spherical, spiked, and fractal forms. The showcase also highlights a sampling of early 20th century and contemporary explorations of space, light, and perspective by artists like Martin Lewis, Emilio Sanchez, John Ross, and many more.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in September. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the May Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. Volume XXXVII, Number 2 May 2014 CLICK TO READ

The Old Print Gallery Showcase
Volume XXXVII, Number 2
May 2014
CLICK TO READ

We hope you enjoy it!

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Prints

Washington Post Review of ROSS/ROMANO

71204Mark Jenkins, arts writer for The Washington Post, featured our ROSS/ROMANO show in his most recent column. Follow the link below to read his article, and make sure to stop by the gallery before July 13th to see the show in person.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/galleries-john-ross-and-clare-romano-at-the-old-print-gallery/2013/07/03/7ed560e4-e25e-11e2-8657-fdff0c195a79_story.html#

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Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Linocut, Lithograph, Offset Lithograph, Prints, Woodcut

PER∙FORM to open in July

On the High Wire.  [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010.

On the High Wire. [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010.

PER∙FORM

We are very happy to announce our upcoming summer show, PER∙FORM, which opens on Friday, July 19, 2013. As always, there will be a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-8pm on that opening Friday. The show will stay up on the gallery walls until September 14, 2013.

PER∙FORM celebrates depictions of dancers, musicians, circus performers, and stars of the stage, and pulls from our inventory of both early 20th century and contemporary prints. Ranging from abstract to figurative, these compositions are ambitious and inventive in their attempt to capture sound, forms in movement, and the indefinable energy- both physical and emotional- that fuels and motivates performers.

Vibrato II. By Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006.

Vibrato II. By Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006.

Highlights include Stanley Kaplan’s Vibrato II, which uses multiple, repeated cuts into a linoleum matrix to mimic the quiver of its musical title and an original offset lithograph, circa 1938, that announces the arrival of Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey circus performers to 5th and Florida Avenue in Washington, DC. Another showstopper is Robert Riggs’ Drum Major. Completed in charcoal and red crayon, Riggs uses deft and simple line work to conjure up a musician who has given his whole body over to the performance- back arched and foot in mid stomp.

Untitled. [Drum Major]. By Robert Riggs. Charcoal & red crayon, c.1930.

Untitled. [Drum Major]. By Robert Riggs. Charcoal & red crayon, c.1930.

Several prints offer more intimate compositions- dancers hovering in the wings of a theater, a reserved and focused duo practicing for a recital. These serve as a nice contrast to scenes of rigorous athleticism and dramatic lighting mixing on center stage.  As such, this collection of prints not only showcases the spirit and emotive vitality of performers, but also draws attention to the diverse venues in which these performers execute their talent. Scenes are set under striped circus tents and red-curtained stages, as well as on subway platforms and city streets- proving that these printmakers were inspired by acts of performance both  practiced and spontaneous.

You said you had a Story?  (Sweet Smell of Success.). By Maya Hardin. Softground, 2002.

You said you had a Story? (Sweet Smell of Success.) By Maya Hardin. Softground, 2002.

Subway Dance. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color, finished by hand, 2007.

Subway Dance. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color, finished by hand, 2007.

Selected Artists: Abe Blashko, Central PTG and Illinois Co., Robert Cook, Joseph Essig, Eugene C. Fitsch, Thomas Handforth, Maya Hardin, Stanley Kaplan, Dorie Marder, Doel Reed, Robert Riggs, Arnold Ronnebeck, John Ross, Andree Ruellan, Georges Schreiber, Thomas Seawell, Ellen Nathan Singer, John Sloan, Sam Swerdloff, and Bruce Waldman.

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey. Published by Central PTG. and Illinois. Co., Chicago, U.S.A. Offset lithograph, c. 1938.

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey. Published by Central PTG. and Illinois. Co., Chicago, U.S.A. Offset lithograph, c. 1938.

PER∙FORM on the OPG Website: click here.

PER∙FORM Press Release: click here.

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