Early 20th Century, Engraving, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Updates, Maps, Old Print Gallery Showcase, Prints, Wood, Woodcut

Upcoming Events at OPG

Tribune Tower. Martin Levine. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Ed. 10/50.  Image size 11 3/4 x 15 5/8 inches Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Tribune Tower. Martin Levine. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Ed. 10/50. Image size 11 3/4 x 15 5/8 inches Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Last Weekend for Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print 

Stop by this weekend to see our exhibit Form Light Line: Architecture in Print before the show comes down on Sunday. This group show of 18 printmakers spans over 90 years of creative expression, with prints by 20th century American artists John Taylor Arms, Martin Lewis, and Armin Landeck coupled with works by cutting-edge, contemporary printmakers. Artists have long found beauty in the strength, durability, and utility of buildings. Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print allows gallery viewers to experience familiar constructions through the artist’s eye- to visually explore how surfaces capture light, how windows both reveal and reflect, and how dimensional spaces can be flattened and abstracted into planes of light and dark.

“Architecture has a natural affinity with printmaking. Buildings begin as lines on paper and are increasingly likely to end up as unadorned assemblies of right angles and blank planes. There are some pictures in the Old Print Gallery’s impressive “Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print” that are similarly stark. More of them, though, exalt the details of commercial, industrial or ecclesiastical structures.” Mark Jenkins, Washington Post 

Read the full Washington Post review here. See the prints selected for the show here.  Form Light Line: Architecture in Print will be on view until September 13, 2014.


Athletes. By John J. A. Murphy. Wood Engraving, c.1930. Image size 6 15/16 x 7 3/4 inches. LINK.

Athletes. By John J. A. Murphy. Wood Engraving, c.1930. Image size 6 15/16 x 7 3/4 inches. LINK.

Ink & Grain Opens Next Friday, September 18th

We are excited to announce our new fall print show, Ink & Grain, which will open next Friday, September 19, 2014 with a free opening night reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. Ink & Grain highlights 20th century printmakers who excelled in woodcuts and wood engravings. One of the most ancient forms of printmaking, the woodcut saw an energized revival during the 20th century. American printmakers experimented heavily with technique, by manipulating the grain of the wooden matrix and crafting new methods of ink and color application. Ink & Grain celebrates this renaissance and the skilled printmakers who worked in the form of editioned prints, hand-made books, and commercial book illustrations.

Selected Artists: Gustave Baumann, Asa Cheffetz, Werner Drewes, Leo Frank, Antonio Frasconi, Eliza Draper Gardiner, Norma Bassett Hall, Barbara Latham, Clare Leighton, John J. A. Murphy, Luigi Rist, Mabel Royds, Charles Svendsen, Paul Wenck, Lawrence N. Wilbur, and Adja Yunkers.

To see the prints selected for this show, click here. To read the full Ink & Grain Press release, click here.


A New Fall Showcase in October

The Old Print Gallery publishes informative quarterly showcases, to keep our collectors apprised of new prints added to our inventory and spotlight significant pieces they can add to their own personal collections. We are adding the finishing touches to our Fall 2014 Showcase, which will hit mailboxes and inboxes in early October.

Inspired by our Ink & Grain show, this Showcase will delve further into the world of woodcuts and wood engravings. By pulling pieces from our historical print (and map!) collection, 20th century works, and contemporary prints, we can track this printmaking medium through time. We also have gorgeous examples of 18th century maps of the Americas from likes of Thomas Kitchen, Robert de Vaugondy, and a special full-page feature on Fry & Jefferson’s A Map of the Most Inhabited part of Virginia. We round out the catalog with Audubon and Gould natural history prints, Currier & Ives landscapes, and a very unique print to grace the cover. 

Sign up below if you would like to be added to our Showcase mailing list:

 

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Color Woodcut, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Landscapes, Prints, Wood, woodblock print, Woodcut

“Ink & Grain” to open in September

Autumn Road Santa Fe. By Norma Basset Hall. Color woodblock, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist.

Autumn Road Santa Fe. By Norma Basset Hall. Color woodblock, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist.

The Old Print Gallery is proud to announce its new fall print show, Ink & Grain, which will open on Friday, September 19, 2014 with a free opening night reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. Ink & Grain is a group show, highlighting 20th century printmakers who excelled in woodcuts and wood engravings. The exhibit will remain on view at the Old Print Gallery until November 15th, 2014.

One of the most ancient forms of printmaking, the woodcut was in huge decline in the 19th century, as printmakers turned to other forms of reproductive mediums. Luckily, the 20th century saw a revived and energized artistic expression for woodcuts and wood engravings. These new woodcut artists experimented heavily with technique, in ways both innovative and nuanced. Printmakers, like Werner Drewes and Barbara Latham, incorporated the grain of the woodblock directly into the composition of their prints- surrendering to its complexities while highlighting its unique, undulating patterns. Others, including Gustave Baumann, Leo Frank, Norma Bassset Hall, and Luigi Rist, experimented with new methods of ink and color application, resulting in stylized prints in a bold, modern palate, as well as softer, luminous color prints inked onto thin Japanese paper.

Sea Shell and Carlic. Luigi Rist. Color woodcut, 1947. Signed in ink on the block. Titled and inscribed "150 Edition" in pencil.

Sea Shell and Garlic. Luigi Rist. Color woodcut, 1947. Signed in ink on the block. Titled and inscribed “150 Edition” in pencil.

Wood engravings also saw a resurgence during the 20th century, especially in the form of artist’s hand-made books and commercial book illustrations. The show includes works by skilled wood engravers Clare Leighton, Lawrence N. Wilbur, and John Murphy, all who made a name for themselves as dynamic illustrators and artists.

Digging Potatoes. By Clare Leighton. Wood engraving, 1935. Signed and titled in pencil. Edition 30.

Digging Potatoes. By Clare Leighton. Wood engraving, 1935. Signed and titled in pencil. Edition 30.

Selected Artists: Gustave Baumann, Asa Cheffetz, Werner Drewes, Leo Frank, Antonio Frasconi, Eliza Draper Gardiner, Norma Bassett Hall, Barbara Latham, Clare Leighton, Alessandro Mastro-Valerio, John J. A. Murphy, Luigi Rist, Mabel Royds, Charles Svendsen, Paul Wenck, Lawrence N. Wilbur, and Adja Yunkers.

 

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American Views, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Landscapes, New Additions, Prints, Wood, woodblock print

New Additions: 20th Century Printmakers

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSThe Old Print Gallery has been exhibiting early and mid-20th century prints for seven years now- a (very exciting) result of joining forces with The Old Print Shop in 2006. In the past month, we have added prints by several new (to us) 20th century printmakers- which we are happy to share with the OPG blog readers today. Below is a sampling of  works by three new artists ( the other three artists will come in a later post). We hope you enjoy the new additions to our ever-growing collection of fine prints.


 John J.A. Murphy ( 1888-1967)

Murphy was an American  painter, wood engraver and book maker, who studied at Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Art Student League, and the London Central School of Art. He participated in the early 20th century revival of the woodblock print, often exploring religious and metaphysical subject matter. Murphy completed his major wood engraving print series “The Way of the Cross” in 1921, which featured 14 black and white prints on Japanese Paper. He also wrote poems to accompany many of his wood engravings.

Athletes. By John J. A. Murphy. Wood engraving, c.1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

Athletes. By John J. A. Murphy. Wood engraving, c.1930. Edition unknown. LINK.


Norma Bassett Hall (1889- 1957)

Norma Bassett Hall was a printmaker and painter, best known for her color woodcuts in the style of the Arts and Crafts movement- representational scenes of the West printed in strong color with dynamic contrast. Born in Oregon, Hall attended school at the Chicago Art Institute, before returning to Portland to set up her own studio. From Portland, she and her etcher husband traveled to a long list of destinations, including Kansas, France, Britain, Scotland, Virginia, and New Mexico. Hall’s early prints are all woodblocks printed with opaque oil-based inks. She later shifted to using water-based inks after meeting and studying with Japanese printmaking expert Mabel Royds in Scotland. Hall was one of the 10 artists that formed the Wichita-based print collective Prairie Print Makers, and the only female member. Always drawn to color, Hall’s landscapes sometimes employed as many as seven different blocks, all cut into her favorite hard cherry wood.

Autumn Road Santa Fe. Norma Bassett Hall. Color wood block, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist. LINK.

Autumn Road Santa Fe. Norma Bassett Hall. Color wood block, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist. LINK.

Laguna Skyline. [New Mexico.] By Norma Bassett Hall. Color woodblock, 1931. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Laguna Skyline. [New Mexico.] By Norma Bassett Hall. Color woodblock, 1931. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.


Roi Partridge (1888-1984)

Born in Centralia, a territory in Washington, Partridge spent his early artistic years in the Pacific Northwest- exploring nature and all Western scenery had to offer with a small group of fellow artists called the Triad (which consisted of Partridge, John Davidson Butler and Clare Shepard). In 1909, he moved to NY and studied a year at the National Academy of Design- his brief and only stint with art school. Traveling to Munich, and not able to afford formal art classes, he worked informally with the printmaker Brockhoff. It is during his time in Germany that he was first introduced to etching. Partridge then moved to Paris, where, again, in lieu of art school, he compulsively read art books and kept a diligent schedule of sketching Parisian architecture, scenes, and portraits. He also worked as a printmaker, under the guidance of friend and mentor Bertha Jaques, founder of the Chicago Society of Etchers.

In 1914, he returned to Seattle, where he worked until 1917, when he and his family moved to San Francisco. He taught at Mills College in California, and served as the first Director of the College’s art gallery. Upon returning from Europe, he almost exclusively printed scenes of nature. His circle of friends in California consisted of great artists Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Edward Weston- all were mesmerized by the beauty of their natural surroundings, trying hard to capture its essence in art.

On the Range. By Roi Partridge. Etching, 1932-33. Edition 63. Signed in plate lower right "Roi Partridge 1932-33." LINK.

On the Range. By Roi Partridge. Etching, 1932-33. Edition 63. Signed in plate lower right “Roi Partridge 1932-33.” LINK.

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