16th Century Maps, American Maps, Maps, New Additions, Woodcut

New Additions: Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula

Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). Image size 10 x 13 3/8" (25.5 x 34.1 cm) plus margins. Very good condition save for some minor splitting along centerfold. Black & white. LINK.

Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). Image size 10 x 13 3/8″ (25.5 x 34.1 cm) plus margins. Very good condition save for some minor splitting along centerfold. Black & white. LINK.

Munster’s map of New World is one of the most important and influential maps of the 16th Century, as it is the earliest to show all of North and South America in a true continental form. This impression is a rare second state of the map, from Munster’s “Cosmography”.  In this second state, published c.1544, the title was changed from “Novae Insulae XVII. . .” to “Novae Insulae XXVI . . .” and appeared in only one edition, making it very scarce.

Geographically, North America is oddly shaped and depicts one of the great geographic misconceptions.  In 1523, Giovanni di Verrazano, a Florentine explorer sailing for King Francis I of France, passed by the outer banks of the Carolinas. He mistook Pamlico Sound for an Oriental Sea that would lead to the Spice Islands, believing that the Barrier Islands were all that constituted North America at the point of the Carolinas. Munster recorded and included Verrazano’s accounts in the greatly successful “Cosmography,” which propagated the myth for many years.

(Detail of North America, depicting the slim Barrier Islands of the Carolinas as the only land mass between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.) Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

Detail of North America, depicting the slim Barrier Islands of the Carolinas as the only land mass between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.
Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

This early map is filled with interesting cartographic details.

  • The flags of Spain (on Puerto Rico) and Portugal (shown in the South Atlantic) depict their respective spheres of influence in the New World.

    Detail of flag of Spain on Puerto Rico (at left) and flag of Portugal in the South Atlantic (at right). Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

    Detail of flag of Spain on Puerto Rico (at left) and flag of Portugal in the South Atlantic (at right).
    Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

  • The Yucatan Peninsula is shown as an Island.
  • This is the first map to name the Pacific Ocean (Mare Pacificum).
  • South America is depicted with a large bulge in the northwest and notes that cannibals inhabit parts of it.

    Detail of northwest bulge of South America, inhabited by terrifying cannibals hiding in bushes. Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

    Detail of northwest bulge of South America, inhabited by terrifying cannibals hiding in bushes.
    Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

  • It is also the first map to show Japan (Zipangri), based entirely upon the accounts of Marco Polo and other early travelers.

    Detail of Japan, marked as "Zipangri" on this map. Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

    Detail of Japan, marked as “Zipangri” on this map.
    Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

  • Shown in the Pacific Ocean is Magellan’s ship, Victoria.

    Detail of Magellan's ship "Victoria",  first ship to successfully circumnavigate the world. Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

    Detail of Magellan’s ship “Victoria”, the first ship to successfully circumnavigate the world.
    Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

Overall, this map is as interesting as it is cartographically significant, and would make an impressive addition to any map collection. Come see it in person at our Georgetown gallery, which is open every Tuesday- Saturday.

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Bronze, Drawing, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Sculpture, Steel

Soaring into Three Dimensions

The Old Print Shop presents a show of SCULPTURE and DRAWINGS by Robert Cook and Masaaki Noda

May 10 – June 27

Opening Reception Saturday, May 10, from 1-4pm

Long-known as a prominent resource for prints and works on paper, our partner, The Old Print Shop in NYC, is expanding its repertoire with an exhibit of two artists, each notably accomplished in the discipline of sculpture. The street-level gallery, recently created to show contemporary art, has been further configured to accommodate this show.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Cook was born in Boston in 1921. He studied with George Demetrios, a classical sculptor. During WWII he served in Europe as an engineer making maps and models. After the war he stayed in Paris to study with Marcel Gaumont at L’Academie des Beaux Arts. In 1948 he moved to Rome. He is an innovator in the “lost wax” process of casting, creating larger sculptures than had previously been possible. He has a number of major public sculptures in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Saudi Arabia, Italy and Canberra, Australia. His work, “Dinoceras,” is in New York at Park Avenue and 51st Street. His works are in the Victoria and Albert Museum, The British Museum, the Hirshorn Collection, the Whitney Museum and the Mobile Museum of Art. He draws inspiration for his sculptures from dance, theater, sports and animals. Jazz music infuses his studio as he works.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995. Link.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995.

Masaaki Noda was born in Hiroshima, Japan, in 1949. He studied at Osaka University of Arts, and in 1977 he came to the United States and studied at The Art Students League. He pursues sculpture in a unique way, making paper and clay models until he has the exact design he is seeking. He has had numerous public installations in Japan, Greece, and China, including an exhibition of his work at the Shenzhen Museum of Art in China. His work is in numerous public collections including the Brooklyn Museum, Fukuyama Museum of Art in Japan, Hiroshima Perfectural Art Museum, Portland Art Museum, Philadelphia Museum of Art and Shenzhen Museum of Art. Masaaki draws inspiration from the artistic conflict between form and abstraction.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

For more information on this show, go to The Old Print Shop website: www.oldprintshop.com.

If you are in the New York area, we invite you to come and see the show. Both artists will be at the opening reception on Saturday, May 10th from 1 till 4 pm. Masaaki Noda will be there in person and Robert Cook will attend from Italy, via Skype.

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18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Views, Lithograph, New Additions, Prints, Steel plate engraving, Wood

New Additions: Views of Asia

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe have recently added several new prints to our website- all foreign views of China, Japan, and Southeast Asia. The majority of them are steel engravings or toned lithographs, coming from 19th century travel books. The scenes capture important shipping ports, fantastic and lively village scenes, and several views of monasteries and temples. Priced relatively low- most under $100- these scenes make great gifts for the world explorer on your list, and are also a great way to remember your own travel experiences. Enjoy!

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