Prints

“Light, Shadow & Time” opens May 20th

Reflections on a Crosstown Vista.  Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2015 Image size 12 1/16 x 12 1/16" (30.7 x 30.7 cm).

Reflections on a Crosstown Vista. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2015. Image size 12 1/16 x 12 1/16″ (30.7 x 30.7 cm). LINK.

We are excited to announce our upcoming summer show, Light, Shadow & Time, a group of contemporary prints from 16 talented emerging and established printmakers. The prints selected are an eclectic mix, but all explore the patterns found in our natural and manufactured world. Whether by exploring the layering and rearrangement of natural textures or the effect of light and time on a subject, these artists see compositions in the everyday, the fleeting, the organic, and the microscopic. Light, Shadow & Time opens on Friday, May 20 and runs through Saturday, September 10, 2016.

With an important focus on the temporal and ephemeral interplay between architecture and light, Patrick Anderson and James Haggerty create dynamic scenes out of shifting shadows, highlighting the emotive warmth and coolness of light. Similarly, Grace Bentley Scheck’s collagraph explores the passage of time “recorded in the marks left by functional changes made in structures over many years, by human design or the elements, and in changing patterns of light and shadow as the sun makes its daily journey across the sky.”

Early Morning Light. Patrick Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 4 1/4 x 4 1/4" (10.8 x 10.8 cm). LINK.

Early Morning Light. Patrick Anderson. Serigraph, 2003. Image size 4 1/4 x 4 1/4″ (10.8 x 10.8 cm). LINK.

In a trio of highly patterned, organic collages entitled “Room to Grow” Heather McMordie links the puzzle-like nature of printmaking and geology.  Creating three large editions from one woodblock and one lithographic stone, and then drawing on, cutting apart, and piecing together these editions, McMordie takes the composition in as many different directions as possible, paralleling how a combination of just a few elements can create countless different minerals, rocks, and soils. Pattern in nature is further explored in Barbara Milton’s dizzying examination of layered tree leaves, Cleo Wilkinsons’ haunting portrait of the folds and subtle curves of a hibiscus flower, and Nancy Previs’ intimate, mystical composition of water flowing over rough rock, printed in green tint.

All together, the show encourages the viewers to pause, see, and reflect on the spaces, natural or man-made, that they occupy throughout the day.

Selected Artists: Patrick Anderson, Philip Bennet, Grace Bentley Scheck, Steven Brigidi, Richard T. Davis, James Haggerty, Heather McMordie, Barbara Minton, Jake Muirhead, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Ellen Nathan Singer, Nancy Previs, Steven Walker, Larry Welo, Art Werger, and Cleo Wilkinson.

Celestial Light. [The Metropolitan Museum of Art.] By James Haggerty. Etching and chine colle, 2004. Image size 11 11/6 x 5 13/16" (297 x 147 mm). LINK.

Celestial Light. [The Metropolitan Museum of Art.] By James Haggerty. Etching and chine colle, 2004. Image size 11 11/6 x 5 13/16″ (297 x 147 mm). LINK.

Verdure. By Barbara Minton. Etching and aquatint printed in color, 2000. Image size 17 3/8 x 14 3/4" (44.1 x 37.5 cm). LINK.

Verdure. By Barbara Minton. Etching and aquatint printed in color, 2000. Image size 17 3/8 x 14 3/4″ (44.1 x 37.5 cm). LINK.

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Our Mixed Winter Show is now on view at The Old Print Gallery. Stop by our Georgetown shop to see these stunning original 20th century and contemporary prints.Mixed Winter Show

Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Openings, Prints

On View Now…

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Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Prints

Mixed Winter Show

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16" (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16″ (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

From November 20th through February 12th, the Old Print Gallery will display a new selection of prints from emerging and established printmakers, pulling from both our 20th century and contemporary print collection. This showcase of prints will exhibit a variety of printmaking techniques, and range from representational to abstract in theme. Just in time for the 2015 Holiday Season, this eclectic and impressive mix will have original artwork available at all price points, with prints desirable to the seasoned art collector as well as those looking to break into the market.

Selected Artists: Alexander Archipenko, Albert W. Barker, Philip Bennet, Matt Brown, Asa Cheffetz, Robert Cook, Michael Di Cerbo, Werner Drewes, Richard Florsheim, Eric Goldberg, Rockwell Kent, Richard Lubell, Heather McMordie, Frederick Mershimer, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Matt Phillips, Emilio Sanchez, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Benton Murdoch Spruance, and Lawrence N. Wilbur.

To see the prints included in the show, click here.

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4" (428 x 337 mm).

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4″ (428 x 337 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8" (428 x 327 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8″ (428 x 327 mm).

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4".

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4″.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints, Watercolor

RED show

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

We are very excited to announce our early spring show, RED, which will open with a nighttime reception on February 15, 2013.  RED is a group show of contemporary and early 20th century printmakers who feature the emboldened and passionate hue of red in their prints. Red is the color of blood, fire, earthen clay and blushing petals, and as such, has strong symbolic connections to life and vitality. The selected artists use this energizing pigment to excite the eye and engage viewers- drawing them into their dynamic compositions.

Highlights include a monotype, Fast Forward, by Washington, DC artist Rosemary Cooley, whose concentrated red tones pulsate beneath more delicate looping white and blue strokes. Similarly, red weaves its way along limbs, eyes, and biomorphic shapes in Cantos y Voces and outlines two faces in Black & White, both by Karima Muyaes. Here, red symbolizes blood-ties and familial relationships, linking disparate visages together into a cohesive whole.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Red also is used by artists in representations of our natural world. It shows up in the rust-colored canyons of John Ross’s collagraphs, in the flushed petals of Clare Romano’s Mallorcan Flower and Nina Muys’ Hibiscus, and in the ominous and bruised red and purple sky of Frederick Mershimer’s Eye of the Storm.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

The show will be on view until April 13, 2013. We encourage all our blog readers and gallery followers to attend the RED opening reception and show, to see these beautiful and striking prints in person.

Selected Artists: Will Barnet, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Robert Birmelin, Rosemary Cooley, Antonio Frasconi, Susan Goldman, Mary Manusos, Tokoha Matsuda, Heather McMordie, Judy Mensch, Frederick Mershimer, Karima Muyaes, Nina Muys, Michael Pellettieri, Matt Phillips, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Clare Romano, John Ross, and Hank Virgona.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

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Contemporary, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints

July Show Water at The Old Print Gallery

Gale, Old Wheeler’s Island. By Richard Carleton. Etching, 2001.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to present Water, a group show featuring prints by local, national, and international contemporary artists. Water will open on Friday, July 20, 2012, with a nighttime reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. The show will be on view until September 14, 2012. With a subject matter as open and expansive as water, the show yields both personal and universal interpretations for artist and viewer.

Splash. By Philip Bennet, oil-based monotype,2004.

Abstraction and illusion are prominent in the works of Water. Judy Mensch’s woodblock Water 1 is a product of seven woodblocks, ten passes, and eight colors. The result is a dynamic distillation of water in stripes of deep blues and greens. Philip Bennet’s Splash, too, is an abstract blend of colors, forgoing form to capture a more visceral depiction of a plunge into watery depths. NY artist Peter Milton incorporates overlays of watery motifs in his large, dreamlike images. Here, water alludes to the shadowy depths of the subconscious, and hints at memories and influences from the artist’s past.

Waterfall. By Peter Milton. Digital print, 2010.

Some Fragments VIII-C. By Takamune Ishiguro. Etching and aquatint, 2005.

Marked is the artists’ ability to evoke watery imagery from the hard matrices of copper plates and woodblocks. Simple cuts and gouges transform into brilliantly dappled light on water’s surface in Karen Whitman’s Adrift. Likewise, rough, turmoil waves emerge from the constant rocking and reworking of the plate in Art Werger’s Requiem. Other artists highlight the liquid properties of inked media itself to communicate a watery essence. Takume Ishiguro’s use of aquatint and water-based inks in Some Fragments VII-C adds fluidity and glassiness to his macro depiction of water bubbles. Whether water is depicted in large scale or small scale, figuratively or metaphorically, its capacity to mesmerize and captivate artists’ attention is undeniable.

Selected Artists: William J. Behnken, Philip Bennet, Richard Carleton, Antonio Frasconi, Takamune Ishiguro, Stanley Kaplan, Alessandro Mastro-Valerio, Judy Mensch, Frederick Mershimer, Peter Milton, Clare Romano, Ilse Schreiber Noll, Herbert Simon, Mary Teichman, Art Werger, and Karen Whitman.

For more information, please visit our Events page on our website, or check out the images selected for the show on our Current Show page. We hope to see you all there at the opening!

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