Aquatint, Contemporary, Gallery Updates, Prints

Washington Post Review of “Winter Contemporary Show”

Moonrise Tide.  By Jake Muirhead. Softground and aquatint, 2013.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground and aquatint, 2013.

Mark Jenkins, arts writer for The Washington Post, featured our Winter Contemporary Show  in his most recent column. Follow the link below to read his article, and make sure to stop by the gallery before February 15 to see the show in person.

Washington Post  2/7/14 review of Winter Contemporary Show

( Quick note: Our exhibit  is the second show reviewed, so it does take some scrolling to get to the write up on the Winter Contemporary Show).

Standard
Abstract, Aquatint, Collage, Contemporary, Figurative, Oil Painting, Prints, Woodcut

2013 Winter Contemporary Show

Moonrise Tide.  By Jake Muirhead. Softground and aquatint, 2013.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground and aquatint, 2013.

The Old Print Gallery’s 2013 Winter Contemporary Show will open on Friday, November 15, 2013 with a celebratory nighttime reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. Eleven different artists, who use printmaking as their primary medium for artistic expression, were selected for this show.  The works chosen resonate with skill and intention, and reflect the current eclecticism of contemporary printmaking. The show will remain on view until February 15, 2014.

Highlights include new works by local DC artists Jake Muirhead and Phillip Bennet. Muirhead’s large seascape, Moonrise Tide, offers evidence of the artist’s capable and deliberate draftsmanship. In his smaller still life, Bulb, Muirhead uses flowing delicate lines and subtle aquatint, resulting in a print that feels both intimate and fresh. Philip Bennet’s new abstract works are almost playful with their use of brilliantly saturated colors and suggestive titles, All Seeing Eyes and The First Day.

The First Day. By Philip Bennet. Acrylic painting on paper, 2012.

The First Day. By Philip Bennet. Acrylic painting on paper, 2012.

Sumo Kimono. By Pia Oste-Alexander. Collage, undated.

Sumo Kimono. By Pia Oste-Alexander. Collage, undated.

The 2013 Winter Contemporary Show also highlights several innovative approaches to printmaking. Pia Oste-Alexander’s Sumo Kimono is an artful assemblage of artist painted and printed paper, fabric and found patterns.  The gallery is also excited to showcase two prints from Heather McMordie’s 2013 series Not Made For Each Other. In Not Made For Each Other, woodblocks carved with independently derived imagery are printed on top of one another to create one image out of two. The blocks themselves are not made for use together, but with careful color selection and deliberate compositional choices, a cohesive image emerges. According to the artist, the prints “challenge the preconceived notions of what colors, shapes, and textures should or should not ‘work together’, and demonstrate the ability of an object to adapt in relation to another object.”

Not Made For Each Other V. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013.  *Photographed under glass.

Not Made For Each Other V. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013. *Photographed under glass.

Selected Artists: Philip Bennet, Eric Goldberg, Susan Goldman, Su-Li Hung, Heather McMordie, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Pia Oste-Alexander, Larry Welo, Art Werger, and Cleo Wilkinson.

Standard
Contemporary, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, New Additions, Prints, Woodcut

New Additions: Heather McMordie

Not Made For Each Other V. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013.  *Photographed under glass.

Not Made For Each Other V. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013. *Photographed under glass.

We were recently acquired two new prints from Philadelphia artist Heather McMordie, for our upcoming 2013 Winter Contemporary Show (opening November 15th!). We are very excited by these prints- they are color woodcuts with hand-cut paper elements- and both come from a series of five prints, entitled Not Made For Each Other.

Here is what the artist had to say about the series- her inspiration and method for working:

” Nature—specifically the intersections of rock, plant, and soil—is the driving source of imagery behind my work. There is a resilience to the natural world, an ability to adapt even in the harshest conditions, while still maintaining integrity. Trees drop branches to replenish nutrient-deprived soils; root systems foster micro-organisms to break soil into usable parts; water slowly rolls over stone to carry fragments downstream to fruitful deposits of sediment. The inorganic, the organic, and the zone where the two intermingle—all three are inextricably dependent in a delicate balance, a balance that prevails despite drastic threats to its order.

The idea of resilience and order in the midst of opposing forces is explored in my most recent body of work. In Not Made For Each Other, woodblocks carved with independently derived imagery are printed on top of one another to create one image out of two. The blocks themselves are not made for use together, but with careful color selection and deliberate compositional choices, a cohesive image emerges. These prints reflect the incomprehensibility of the pairings one finds in nature. They challenge the preconceived notions of what colors, shapes, and textures should or should not “work together”, and demonstrate the ability of an object to adapt in relation to another object.” 

Not Made For Each Other IV. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013.  *Photographed under glass.

Not Made For Each Other IV. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013. *Photographed under glass.

We hope you enjoyed this sneak peek into our 2013 Winter Contemporary Show. Make sure you check back  for new updates about the upcoming exhibit, including more previews of the selected prints!

Standard
17th Century Prints, 18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, Collagraph, Contemporary, Copperplate, Die-cut Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Foreign Views, Lithograph, Maps, Monotype, Natural History, Prints

Valentine’s Day Gifts

Still searching for a last-minute Valentine’s Day gift? Don’t know what to get that special someone? Check out our Valentine’s Day gift ideas below:

1. Antique Valentine’s Day Cards

While handmade Valentine’s Day cards were in existence long before, the first printed paper cards made in the United States appeared around 1840. We  have cards with cute sayings, sweet messages, and beautiful hand-cut paper lace. We also sell many stand-up cards with a base and several three-dimensional fold-out layers, which were popular designs from about 1895 until 1915.  Prices start at $15 and go up from there.

80596

My Love to Thee : Unworthy are my hands to hold those dainty hands in mine, : Unworthy are my lips to touch those rosy lips of thine… Paper lace, c.1900.

74761

I Love You. Hang on to me, My Valentine. Die-cut color lithograph. Undated, c.1920.

2. Flower Prints

Give her a bouquet of flowers that will never wilt and die. We have a very large antique print collection of flowers and floral arrangements. Hand colored in nature’s full spectrum and intricately engraved, these prints make a beautiful and thoughtful Valentine’s Day gift!

48142

[Monnoyer Floral Arrangement in Classical Vase]. By Jean Baptiste Monnoyer. Published by N. de Poilly, Paris. Etching with engraving, hand colored, c. 1670-80.

buchoz_bot_fritillaria_imperialis_pl_ii_3089

Fritillaria imperialis. Linn. Pl. II. By Pierre Joseph Buchoz. Engraving, hand colored, 1775-78. From Buchoz’ “Histoire Universelle du Regne Vegetale”, published Paris.

3. RED prints

Our new contemporary show, aptly named RED, features prints in this passionate and romantic hue. Pick the bold and pulsating Fast Forward or go with the subdued and modern To be Received Again. The show features a huge range of styles to choose from. And if you are looking for a Valentine’s Day date idea- RED opens on February 15th, with a nighttime reception and party. Interesting art + free wine= great date!

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

To Be Received Again. By Heather McMordie. Lithograph with collagraph, on Stonehenge paper, 2012. Titled and signed by artist in print.  Edition 2/6. $350.00

To Be Received Again. By Heather McMordie. Lithograph with collagraph, on Stonehenge paper, 2012. Titled and signed by artist in print. Edition 2/6.

4. City Views and Maps

Gift your sweet someone a map or view of a special city. Whether it is of the place you met or married, a shared favorite travel spot, or where you both live (and love), city plans and scenes are a personal and unique gift idea.

Grundriss von Washington der neuen Hauptstadt der vereinigten Staaten von Nord-America. By Andrew Ellicott. From an unidentified German publication. Engraving.

Grundriss von Washington der neuen Hauptstadt der vereinigten Staaten von Nord-America. By Andrew Ellicott. From an unidentified German publication. Engraving.

2339

Le Penseur de Notre Dame. John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1923.

5. Cupid Prints

In classical mythology, Cupid (Latin Cupido, meaning “desire”) is the god of desire, affection and love. Celebrate and pay homage to this winged matchmaker with a print from the 17th century “Amorous Mottoes.”

Omnia fentit Amor.  XIII. By A. Diepenbeke. Published Antwerp. Copper engraving, hand colored, 1660. 17th century Amorous Mottoes, with Latin inscriptions.

Omnia fentit Amor. XIII. By A. Diepenbeke. Published Antwerp. Copper engraving, hand colored, 1660. 17th century Amorous Mottoes, with Latin inscriptions.

Omnibus aptus Amor.  XV. By A. Diepenbeke. Published Antwerp. Copper engraving, hand colored, 1660. 17th century Amorous Mottoes, with Latin inscriptions.

Omnibus aptus Amor. XV. By A. Diepenbeke. Published Antwerp. Copper engraving, hand colored, 1660. 17th century Amorous Mottoes, with Latin inscriptions.

Standard
Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints, Watercolor

RED show

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

We are very excited to announce our early spring show, RED, which will open with a nighttime reception on February 15, 2013.  RED is a group show of contemporary and early 20th century printmakers who feature the emboldened and passionate hue of red in their prints. Red is the color of blood, fire, earthen clay and blushing petals, and as such, has strong symbolic connections to life and vitality. The selected artists use this energizing pigment to excite the eye and engage viewers- drawing them into their dynamic compositions.

Highlights include a monotype, Fast Forward, by Washington, DC artist Rosemary Cooley, whose concentrated red tones pulsate beneath more delicate looping white and blue strokes. Similarly, red weaves its way along limbs, eyes, and biomorphic shapes in Cantos y Voces and outlines two faces in Black & White, both by Karima Muyaes. Here, red symbolizes blood-ties and familial relationships, linking disparate visages together into a cohesive whole.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Red also is used by artists in representations of our natural world. It shows up in the rust-colored canyons of John Ross’s collagraphs, in the flushed petals of Clare Romano’s Mallorcan Flower and Nina Muys’ Hibiscus, and in the ominous and bruised red and purple sky of Frederick Mershimer’s Eye of the Storm.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

The show will be on view until April 13, 2013. We encourage all our blog readers and gallery followers to attend the RED opening reception and show, to see these beautiful and striking prints in person.

Selected Artists: Will Barnet, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Robert Birmelin, Rosemary Cooley, Antonio Frasconi, Susan Goldman, Mary Manusos, Tokoha Matsuda, Heather McMordie, Judy Mensch, Frederick Mershimer, Karima Muyaes, Nina Muys, Michael Pellettieri, Matt Phillips, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Clare Romano, John Ross, and Hank Virgona.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

Standard