Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

ETCHED

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.  (Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.
(Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

We are very excited to announce ETCHED, our upcoming OPG show of early 20th century and contemporary original etchings, which will open Friday, February 21, 2014. The gallery will host a nighttime reception that Friday, from 5-8pm, which is open and free to the public. The show will remain on view at the gallery until April 5, 2014, during normal gallery hours.

Etching as a form of printmaking evolved from metal workshops of the Middle Ages, where swords, armor, and tools were all etched with acid to produce intricate line and scroll work. Daniel Hopfer, a 16th century craftsman, applied these metalworking techniques to iron printmaking plates, and was the first to use etching as a form of printmaking. Many artists were soon lured by etching’s capacity to capture the essence and spontaneity of the artist’s hand in printed form.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

ETCHED will celebrate the long legacy of printmakers who specialize in and focus on etching as a way of image making. As the show pulls from over a century of creative expression, viewers will be fascinated by the myriad of ways an artist can use an etched line to create tone, atmosphere, and detail. The show also highlights new technical advances in etching, including multi-plate color etchings and experimental solar plate etchings.

Highlights include meticulously etched architectural views by John Taylor Arms, two direct and intimate portraits by Isabel Bishop and Nicholas Vagenas, and  velvety and dense lines found in works by Peter Milton and Otto Kuhler.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Selected Artists: Sigmund Abeles, John Taylor Arms, Frank W. Benson, Robert Birmelin, Isabel Bishop, Richard Carleton, Arthur Cohen, Robert Cook, Joseph Essig, Takuji Kubo, Otto Kuhler, Yvette Lucas, Charles F. Mielatz, Peter Milton, Ellen Nathan Singer, Joseph Pennell, Susan Pyzow, Nicholas Vagenas, Hank Virgona, Bruce Waldman.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints, Watercolor

RED show

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

We are very excited to announce our early spring show, RED, which will open with a nighttime reception on February 15, 2013.  RED is a group show of contemporary and early 20th century printmakers who feature the emboldened and passionate hue of red in their prints. Red is the color of blood, fire, earthen clay and blushing petals, and as such, has strong symbolic connections to life and vitality. The selected artists use this energizing pigment to excite the eye and engage viewers- drawing them into their dynamic compositions.

Highlights include a monotype, Fast Forward, by Washington, DC artist Rosemary Cooley, whose concentrated red tones pulsate beneath more delicate looping white and blue strokes. Similarly, red weaves its way along limbs, eyes, and biomorphic shapes in Cantos y Voces and outlines two faces in Black & White, both by Karima Muyaes. Here, red symbolizes blood-ties and familial relationships, linking disparate visages together into a cohesive whole.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Red also is used by artists in representations of our natural world. It shows up in the rust-colored canyons of John Ross’s collagraphs, in the flushed petals of Clare Romano’s Mallorcan Flower and Nina Muys’ Hibiscus, and in the ominous and bruised red and purple sky of Frederick Mershimer’s Eye of the Storm.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

The show will be on view until April 13, 2013. We encourage all our blog readers and gallery followers to attend the RED opening reception and show, to see these beautiful and striking prints in person.

Selected Artists: Will Barnet, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Robert Birmelin, Rosemary Cooley, Antonio Frasconi, Susan Goldman, Mary Manusos, Tokoha Matsuda, Heather McMordie, Judy Mensch, Frederick Mershimer, Karima Muyaes, Nina Muys, Michael Pellettieri, Matt Phillips, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Clare Romano, John Ross, and Hank Virgona.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

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Aquatint, Contemporary, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Linocut, Lithograph, Monoprint, Monotype, Photolithograph, Prints, Woodcut

2012 Winter Contemporary Show

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to present its 2012 Winter Contemporary Show, which will open this Friday, November 16, 2012. The show will be an assortment of works by both up-and-coming and established printmakers, in several mediums.  Highlights include a series of charged photolithographic landscapes by Sylvie Covey, beautifully involved linocut relief prints by Karima Muyaes and Tenjin Ikeda, and boldly hued prints by local artists Susan Goldman, Philip Bennet, and Joan Krash.

Bottles & Jars I by Peri Schwartz captures the crisp, luminous glow of the winter months and Neighbor & Orion II by Herbert Simon delivers a similarly poignant study of a hushed, nocturnal landscape, thanks to purposeful use of color. Local artists Jake Muirhead and Marti Patchell’s impressive draftsmanship result in intricate and delicate still lifes, elevating the familiar artichoke and cereus blossom in the process. Many of the artists in the 2012 Winter Contemporary Show are new to the Old Print Gallery, and offer a fresh approach to printmaking.

The exhibit opens with a nighttime reception at the Old Print Gallery on Friday, November 16, from 5-8pm. Many of the artists will be in attendance for the opening, to answer questions regarding their work and artistic process. The opening reception is free and open to all ages. The show will remain on view until February 9, 2013.

Selected Artists:  Philip Bennet, Sylvie Covey, Richard T. Davis, Deron Decesare, Yolanda Frederikse, Susan Goldman, Peter Gourfain, Tenjin Ikeda, Joan Krash, Richard Lubell, Paul Marcus, Ed McCluney, Judy Mensch, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Marti Patchell, Matt Phillips, Susan Pyzow, Peri Schwartz, Herbert Simon, Ellen Nathan Singer, Hank Virgona, and Steven E. Walker.

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Contemporary, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Updates, Prints

Coming Soon…

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Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Oil Can

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two prints of oil cans by 20th century artist Hank Virgona and contemporary printmaker Jake Muirhead.

Hank Virgona was born in Brooklyn in 1929. After leaving the Army 23 years later, Hank took up an interest in art. Mostly self taught, Virgona’s studies consisted of pouring over art books, attending museums, and constant drawing from life- taking subject matter from scenes on the subway, street corners, and parks. Extrapolating from these experiences, Virgona slowly developed his own unique method.

Virgona’s early work consisted of illustrations for prominent magazines; Fortune, Harper’s, Argosy, and the New York Times “Op Ed” page. His commissions received numerous awards, including the Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators. In the late 1960’s, Hank’s focus drifted away from commercial work, and steadied upon his own personal work and ideas. He is very well known for his still lifes, in which the object becomes a metaphor for his feelings. This holds true for his figurative work as well, and can be seen in his Oil Can II– a worn-in, aged object with dents, yet still functional, which offers a quiet reflection on the impact of time.

Jake Muirhead, a talented and local printmaker, is no stranger to The Old Print Gallery or OPG blog. His rendition of the oil can comes from his most recent show here at the gallery- New Prints by Jake Muirhead.  Of his still lifes he writes, “These prints are about the interplay between observation and imagination. While the imagery does resolve itself into recognizable subjects, there are also passages that wander freely into space. When working on a plate, I want the marks to move in and out of the world of figurative description. If a line can be seen as both descriptive and a pure mark- suggestive of any number of things but untethered to anything specific- it breathes and has life”.

The print by Virgona can be purchased in our New York gallery, The Old Print Shop, or on their online website. Muirhead’s print can be purchased from our website or in our Georgetown gallery.

Image on Left: Oil Can II by Hank Virgona. Etching, 1973. Artist’s proof.

Image on Right: Oil Can by Jake Muirhead. Etching and aquatint on Arches Cover paper, 2010. Artist’s proof.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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