Our Mixed Winter Show is now on view at The Old Print Gallery. Stop by our Georgetown shop to see these stunning original 20th century and contemporary prints.Mixed Winter Show

Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Openings, Prints

On View Now…

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Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Prints

Mixed Winter Show

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16" (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16″ (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

From November 20th through February 12th, the Old Print Gallery will display a new selection of prints from emerging and established printmakers, pulling from both our 20th century and contemporary print collection. This showcase of prints will exhibit a variety of printmaking techniques, and range from representational to abstract in theme. Just in time for the 2015 Holiday Season, this eclectic and impressive mix will have original artwork available at all price points, with prints desirable to the seasoned art collector as well as those looking to break into the market.

Selected Artists: Alexander Archipenko, Albert W. Barker, Philip Bennet, Matt Brown, Asa Cheffetz, Robert Cook, Michael Di Cerbo, Werner Drewes, Richard Florsheim, Eric Goldberg, Rockwell Kent, Richard Lubell, Heather McMordie, Frederick Mershimer, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Matt Phillips, Emilio Sanchez, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Benton Murdoch Spruance, and Lawrence N. Wilbur.

To see the prints included in the show, click here.

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4" (428 x 337 mm).

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4″ (428 x 337 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8" (428 x 327 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8″ (428 x 327 mm).

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4".

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4″.

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Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

Tonal Array: Aquatints from the 20th and 21st Century

Beyond the Silence (3) by Takamune Ishiguro. Aquatint, 2008. Image size 23 5/8 x 23 5/8" (600 x 601 mm). Edition 5. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. LINK.

Beyond the Silence (3) by Takamune Ishiguro. Aquatint, 2008. Image size 23 5/8 x 23 5/8″ (600 x 601 mm). Edition 5. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil.

We are very excited to announce our new upcoming show, Tonal Array: Aquatints from the 20th and 21st Century, which will open on Friday, February 20, 2015 with an opening reception from 5-7 pm at the gallery. The show will continue until April 11, 2015.

Aquatint is an etching technique that creates areas of tone through the use of a powdered or ground resin that is sprinkled on a metal plate prior to being bitten by etching acid. Although primarily used in the 18th and 19th centuries as a medium to reproduce the delicate fluidity and transparency of watercolors and paintings, the aquatint survived as an artist’s medium because of its atmospheric effects and flat wash properties. Tonal Array draws attention to the talented printmakers of the 20th and 21st century who experimented and pushed the boundaries of aquatint’s potential. Varying between flat color planes and incredible plate texture, as well as dramatic areas of light and dark, these artists demonstrate a fluid and experimental handling of the medium. The resulting images have an expressive strength and visual intensity that relays the ingenuity to be found in the world of original printmaking.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, John Taylor Arms, Letterio Calapai, Frank Cassara, Joseph Essig, Eric Goldberg, Takamune Ishiguro, Chaim Koppelman, Richard Lubell, Mary Manusos, Frederick Mershimer, Charles F. Mielatz, Jake Muirhead, Merle Perlmutter, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Richard Sloat, Mayumi Takagi, and Henry Ziegler.

Check back soon for more information about the show, about the rich history of aquatints, as well as more show images!

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18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Abstract, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Collagraph, Contemporary, Copperplate, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Landscapes, Linocut, Lithograph, Maps, Mezzotint, Multi-stone Lithograph, Prints, Science, Wood

Print Round-Up: The Moon

In honor of this morning’s “Blood Moon” total lunar eclipse (read about it here), we are sharing a print round-up of our favorite moon related prints. These lunar prints are stunning scientific and artistic representations, from multiple centuries. We hope you enjoy!

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio…. By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio… By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

This is an interesting and decorative map of the surface of the Moon. Doppelmayr was an astronomer as well as a professor of mathematics. He often worked with the Homann heirs.  Together they produced a number of atlases, including Atlas Coelestis and Selenographica.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4" (365 x 210mm). LINK.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4″ (365 x 210mm). LINK.

This print is from Chambers’ and Rees’ Cyclopaedia or, An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. The composite shows diagrams relating to eclipses.

Phases Of The Moon.  By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8" (248 x 217mm). LINK.

Phases Of The Moon. By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8″ (248 x 217mm). LINK.

This chart appeared in Smith’s Illustrated Astronomy, Designed for the Use of the Public or Common Schools in the United States.  This wonderful work was produced by Asa Smith, the Principal of Public School No. 12, in New York City. He notes that the purpose was “to present all distinguishing principles in physical Astronomy with as few words as possible; but with such ocular demonstrations, by way of diagrams and maps, as shall make the subject easily understood.”

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" plus title and margins. LINK.

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ plus title and margins. LINK.

This print is from Das Illustrierte Mississippithal (The Valley of the Mississippi Illustrated).  In the late 1840’s, Henry Lewis traveled the length of the Mississippi and, with the assistance of other artists, assembled a collection of sketches detailing scenery of the entire river.  Based on these drawings, Lewis proceeded to paint a panorama on a continuous length of canvas which would be moved and viewed through a frame.  In the fall of 1848, the completed piece (hundreds and hundreds of feet in length),  began its tour of American cities.  A European tour followed and while in Dusseldorf, in 1853, Lewis teamed up with the publisher Heinrich Arnz to redo the sketches as lithographs, illustrating a book on Mississippi scenery.  While production was sporadic and relatively unprofitable, the resulting seventy-eight lithographs provide a early and remarkably complete record of the Mississippi River.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16" (204 x 151 mm). Link.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16″ (204 x 151 mm). LINK.

This etching by 20th century printmaker John Taylor Arms (1887-1953) is one of many in his oeuvre to include moons or moonlight. The print is an edition of 100 in color and 75 in black and white. This particular impression is an artist proof, and was printed by  Frederick Reynolds. Reynolds was born in London, immigrating to New York in 1911 to establish himself as an artist in the United States. He was an etcher and mezzotint engraver, and operated his own printing studio in New York. In addition to his own works, Reynolds printed for other artists, including Arms.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16". Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right "38". LINK.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16″. Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right “38”. LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8". LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8″. LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16". LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16″. LINK.

Moonrise Tide. (green ink). By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4". LINK.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4″. LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16". LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16″. LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5". LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5″. LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997.  Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11" (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997. Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11″ (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Above are a selection of moon-related prints and drawings from our 20th century and contemporary printmakers. While varying in style and technique, all depict the moon and it’s luminescence casting light and shadows throughout the foreground, making for some very interesting compositions.

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American Views, Citiscapes, Color Lithograph, Contemporary, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Foreign Views, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Lithograph, Prints, Serigraph

Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print

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The Shadow of Brooklyn Bridge. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, 1988. Ed. 100. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its summer 2014 show, Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print. This group show of 19 printmakers spans over 90 years of creative expression, with prints by 20th century American masters John Taylor Arms, Martin Lewis, and Armin Landeck coupled with works by cutting-edge, contemporary printmakers. Form, Light, Line opens on Friday, June 20, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-8pm. The show will remain on view until September 13, 2014.

Artists have long found beauty in the strength, durability, and utility of architecture. Form, Light, Line allows viewers to experience the familiar composition of buildings through the artist’s eye- to visually explore how surface captures light, how windows both reveal and reflect, and how dimensional spaces can be flattened and abstracted into planes of light and dark.

(From Left to Right:) Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2B. Urban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003.

From Left to Right: Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2BUrban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003. LINK.

Highlights include a trio of black and white graphic serigraphs by Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms’ meticulous 1927 etching Lace in Stone, Rouen Cathedral, and a 1929 study for a large watercolor, Spiral Staircase, from the Martin Lewis estate. This pen and ink representation of the Queensboro Bridge is a delicate exploration of space and shading. Also on view is an Armin Landek 1941 engraving Rooftop, with accompanying annotated pen and pencil study for the print. The pair reveals the artist’s approach to perspective, as well as sketches of specific architectural elements, like moldings and chimneys.

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A Bronx Street Corner. By Martin Lewis. Pencil drawing, c.1946. LINK.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms, William Behnken, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Joan Drew, Richard Haas, Su-Li Hung, Sidney Hurwitz, Armin Landeck, Martin Levine, Martin Lewis, Frederick Mershimer, John Ross, Emilio Sanchez, Art Werger, Steven Yamin, and Alex Zwarenstein.

To see all the prints selected for Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print, please visit our website.

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