18th Century Maps, American Maps, Contemporary Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps, Pocket Maps, World Maps

2015 Miami International Map Fair

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775. Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8". Very good condition with attractive wash color. A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida's interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys' "The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America..." LINK.

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775.
Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8″. Very good condition with attractive wash color.
A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida’s interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys’ “The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America…” LINK.

Miami International Map Fair 

February 6- February 8, 2015

We will be attending the 22nd Annual Miami International Map Fair with our NY partners, The Old Print Shop. We hope to see our OPG map collectors at the fair, and will be bringing down our best material. If you can’t make it down to Florida this weekend, feel free to send us your “wish list”. We can look for special, rare, and exciting maps that you want for your walls. This is a great opportunity to create or build upon your personal map collection.  As one of the best and largest map fairs in the world, the event brings together top-notch dealers, lecturers, and collectors for a weekend of engaging and spirited discussion and sharing of maps. For more information on tickets, lecturers, receptions and tours, please visit the HistoryMiami website.  

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18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: Maps of the South

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing maps of the Southeastern United States, recently added to our OPG inventory. Dating from 1790s to 1850s, these maps offer a significant look into the burgeoning growth of our fledgling nation, as conflict, population shifts, and advances in transportation modes created a constant demand for the most up-to-date cartographic information. These maps also are all beautiful examples of American map and atlas publishing, which had its advent with Carey’s “American Atlas” and continued strong into the 19th and 20th century- with vibrant publishing hubs located in New York City, Philadelphia, and Boston. We hope you enjoy these maps!

Map of Florida. By S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., Philadephia. Engraving, hand colored, 1853. Image size 14 3/8 x 11 1/2, plus margins. Good condition, save for some faint damp staining in the lower right. Original hand coloring. LINK.

Map of Florida. By S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., Philadephia. Engraving, hand colored, 1853. Image size 14 3/8 x 11 1/2, plus margins. Good condition, save for some faint damp staining in the lower right. Original hand coloring. LINK.

A fine map of Florida from Mitchell’s “A New Universal Atlas containing maps of the various Empires, Kingdoms, States and Republics of the World.” This map shows Florida is in its fifth year as a state of the Union. Inset maps in the lower  left include plans of Pensacola, Tallahassee, and the Harbor of St. Augustine. The map also includes a distance chart for water routes from place to place.

Plan of the Siege of Savannah. Published by Charles Smith, New York. Engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Copper plate engraving, 1796-97. Images size 8 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Plan of the Siege of Savannah. Published by Charles Smith, New York. Engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Copper plate engraving, 1796-97. Images size 8 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

A rare and detailed battle plan of the city and surroundings of Savannah Georgia. This map appeared in “The Monthly Military Repository, Respectfully Inscribed to the Military of the United States of America.” The “Repository” is an interesting early work. It was published in parts over a span of two years. Smith included instruction on military strategy, conduct, and clothing, extracting from histories of European wars and descriptions of American Revolutionary battles. Most of the descriptions for the American battles were taken from the writings of Baron Steuben and Gen. Horatio Gates. Included were a series of revolutionary battle plans based on those published in London by William Faden. This particular map was engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Almost all the recorded copies of “Repository” are incomplete, lacking one or more maps.

Georgia, from the latest Authorities. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Images size 8 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition save for small area of paper fill in upper left margin, not affecting the image. Black & white. LINK/

Georgia, from the latest Authorities. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Images size 8 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition save for small area of paper fill in upper left margin, not affecting the image. Black & white. LINK.

Engraved by W. Barker for Carey’s “American Atlas…”, the earliest atlas of America produced in America. This is the first edition of one of the earliest obtainable maps of the state of Georgia. The state is shown extending to the Mississippi River and shows portions of East and West Florida and “Tennassee Government.” Noted prominently are native Indian tribes, Chicasaws, Chacataws, Cherokees, Natches, Seminoles and Creeks.

The State of South Carolina from the best Authorities, by Samuel Lewis. 1795. By Samuel Lewis. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Image size 15 3/4 x 17 1/4" plus margins. Fair to good condition. The map was at one time folded and has splits and tiny areas of paper loss along fold lines. Professionally repaired. Black & white. LINK.

The State of South Carolina from the best Authorities, by Samuel Lewis. 1795. By Samuel Lewis. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Image size 15 3/4 x 17 1/4″ plus margins. Fair to good condition. The map was at one time folded and has splits and tiny areas of paper loss along fold lines. Professionally repaired. Black & white. LINK.

This is another fine 18th century map from Carey’s “American Atlas….”, the first atlas published in America. It was engraved by W. Barker. The map shows remarkable topographic detail, and a fairly solid and accurate representation of South Carolina’s river systems. This is a “must-buy” for any South Carolina collector, especially one interested in the state’s significant Federalist period.

 

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18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Chromolithograph, Copperplate, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Lithograph, Natural History, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Reptiles and Amphibians

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSBelow is a sampling of our natural history inventory. Created between the 18th and 20th century, and published across Europe and in early publishing houses of the United States, these prints offer brilliant insight into the scientific dialogue of the past. Early scientists and naturalists would accompany explorers in their travels to newly discovered or conquered lands, recording plants and animals in detailed sketchbooks. Once home, these written descriptions and pencil sketches were put to the engraving plate and lithographic stone, and published in various compendiums of natural history, for wealthy patrons and a fledgling zoology community. Although printed initially for scientific purposes, as more artists became involved and printing technologies improved, natural history prints were collected and celebrated for their beauty and the finesse in which engravers merged science with art. With their alluring geometric patterns and arabesque forms, some of the most accurate and fascinating illustrations of the period were of frogs, snakes, and lizards. To see more reptile and amphibian prints from our inventory, click here. 

Bufo Vulgaris. Bufo Calamita.  Lithograph by Zanetti after Petrus Quattrocchi. From Iconographi della Fauna Italica by Carlo L. Principe Bonaparte. Published by Tipographia Salviucci, Rome, 1832-41. Highly detailed illustrations of three toads, one poisonous. LINK.

Bufo Vulgaris. Bufo Calamita. Lithograph by Zanetti after Petrus Quattrocchi. From Iconographi della Fauna Italica by Carlo L. Principe Bonaparte. Published by Tipographia Salviucci, Rome, 1832-41. Highly detailed illustrations of three toads, one poisonous. LINK.

Flying Dragon. Designed and engraved by William Daniell for his work "Interesting Selections from Animated Nature." Published by Cadell & Davies, London. Aquatint engraving, 1807. From the deluxe edition on large paper with the engravings executed on chine colle. LINK.

Flying Dragon. Designed and engraved by William Daniell for his work “Interesting Selections from Animated Nature.” Published by Cadell & Davies, London. Aquatint engraving, 1807. From the deluxe edition on large paper with the engravings executed on chine colle. LINK.

Untitled Snake, Tab. LVIII. By Albertus Seba. Hand-colored copper plate engraving, 1734-65. Published in Amsterdam. From "Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri Accurata Descripto Et Iconibus Artificiosissmis Expressio..." LINK.

Untitled Snake, Tab. LVIII. By Albertus Seba. Hand-colored copper plate engraving, 1734-65. Published in Amsterdam. From “Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri Accurata Descripto Et Iconibus Artificiosissmis Expressio…” LINK.

No. 412. By F. P. Nodder. Engraving with original hand-color, 1799. Two salamanders from George Shaw's "the Naturalist's Miscellany", published from 1790 to 1813. LINK.

No. 412. By F. P. Nodder. Engraving with original hand-color, 1799. Two salamanders from George Shaw’s “The Naturalist’s Miscellany”, published from 1790 to 1813. LINK.

Anguis niger, maculis rubris & luteis eleganter varius: The Bead Snake; Convolvulus Radice tuberoso esculento: The Virginian Potato. By Mark Catesby. Hand-colored engraving, 1800.  T. 60. From, ‘The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects and Plants:…’ Engravings by Mark Catesby, published in London. LINK.

Anguis niger, maculis rubris & luteis eleganter varius: The Bead Snake; Convolvulus Radice tuberoso esculento: The Virginian Potato. By Mark Catesby. Hand-colored engraving, 1800. T. 60. From, ‘The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects and Plants:…’ Engravings by Mark Catesby, published in London. LINK.

The Black Iguana. By P. J. Smit. Chromolithograph, 1904. Published in Saalfield, New York. From "Library of Natural History" by Richard Lydekker. LINK.

The Black Iguana. By P. J. Smit. Chromolithograph, 1904. Published in Saalfield, New York. From “Library of Natural History” by Richard Lydekker. LINK.

American Frogs and Toads. Lithographed by Julius Bien & Co. Lith.  N.Y.  Published by Todd, Mead & Co., New York. Chromolithograph, 1902. Several types of frogs and toads are pictured. LINK.

American Frogs and Toads. Lithographed by Julius Bien & Co. Lith. N.Y. Published by Todd, Mead & Co., New York. Chromolithograph, 1902. Several types of frogs and toads are pictured. LINK.

Untitled. XXVII. (Aligator, crocodile and two large lizards). Published by A. Fullarton, London and Edinburgh. Engraving with original hand-color, 1854. A natural history print from Oliver Goldsmith's "A History of the Earth and Animated Nature." This edition is distinguished by having the birds and animals displayed in full color against a black-and-white background. LINK.

Untitled. XXVII. (Alligator, crocodile and two large lizards). Published by A. Fullarton, London and Edinburgh. Engraving with original hand-color, 1854. A natural history print from Oliver Goldsmith’s “A History of the Earth and Animated Nature.” This edition is distinguished by having the birds and animals displayed in full color against a black-and-white background. LINK.

Coluber Monspessulanus. By Battistelli. Lithograph, hand-colored, 1834. A 19th century lithograph of a snake in full and inset of an aerial depiction of the snake's head. LINK.

Coluber Monspessulanus. By Battistelli. Lithograph, hand-colored, 1834. A 19th century lithograph of a snake in full and inset of an aerial depiction of the snake’s head. LINK.

Lacertus Griseus: The Lyon Lizard; Viscum Caryophylloides, foliis longis in apice incisis, floris labello albo trifido, petalis luteis, longis augustissimis. By Mark Catesby. Hand-colored engraving, 1800.  T. 68. From, ‘The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects and Plants:…’ Engravings by Mark Catesby, published in London. LINK.

Lacertus Griseus: The Lyon Lizard; Viscum Caryophylloides, foliis longis in apice incisis, floris labello albo trifido, petalis luteis, longis augustissimis. By Mark Catesby. Hand-colored engraving, 1800. T. 68. From, ‘The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects and Plants:…’ Engravings by Mark Catesby, published in London. LINK.

Untitled Snake, Tab. XLII. By Albertus Seba. Published in Amsterdam. Hand-colored copper plate engraving, 1734-65. From Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri Accurata Descripto Et Iconibus Artificiosissmis Expressio... LINK.

Untitled Snake, Tab. XLII. By Albertus Seba. Published in Amsterdam. Hand-colored copper plate engraving, 1734-65. From Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri Accurata Descripto Et Iconibus Artificiosissmis Expressio… LINK.

 

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17th Century Prints, American Views, Copperplate, Engraving

Arx Carolina

Arx Carolina is the title of this intricate and handsome copperplate engraving by Arnoldus Montanus, published in 1671 by Jacob Van Meurs in Amsterdam. The image comes from Montanus’ “Di Nieuwe en Onbekende Weerld: Of Beschryving von America” (trans: The New and Unknown World: Or, description of America and the Southland), a 585 page book adorned with vivid descriptions and illustrations depicting life in America. Montanus, a Dutch teacher, author, and printmaker, studied theology and taught his students about cultures and ecosystems from around the world. “De Nieuwe en Onbekende Weerld” is Montanus’ most famous book, one that was widely circulated during the late 17th century.

Arx Carolina is bird’s eye view of Fort Caroline, a fort established in the years 1562-64 by the Huguenots under French Capt. Jean Ribaut and later by Rene de Laudonniere. Located at the mouth of the River May (what is now St. John’s River, near present-day Jacksonville Florida), Fort Caroline was the site of a short-lived French presence in 16th century America. During this time, France was determined to expand its empire. Spain, the world’s leading power, had a solid foothold in the Americas and France wanted to share in the riches of the New World. Its first attempt to stake a permanent claim in North America was at La Caroline in May of 1562.

The settlement, under the leadership of Ribaut, was seen as a commercial venture at first. However, religious conflict in France, specifically the persecution of French protestants (Huguenots), led Admiral deColigny to make a proposal to the French crown to start a colony as a refuge for the Huguenots and others seeking religious freedom. In June of 1564, 200 French soldiers, artisans, and refuges, led by Rene de Goulaine de Laudonniere settled at La Caroline. Among the settlers was French artist Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues. His job was to paint images of people, flora, fauna, and the geography of the America. It is with his notes and sketches that Montanus was able to accurately depict Fort Caroline more than a century later.

Arx Carolina depicts the early months of the settlement, as settlers and Timucua Indians worked industriously around the base of Fort Caroline, near the river’s south bank, to build a new home for themselves. Settlement went quite smoothly at first; however, as the months drew on, food stores ran out, the relationship between the settlers and the Timucua soured, and a group of settlers decided to mutiny. They left Florida, and sailed to Hispaniola and Cuba, where they were captured by the Spanish. Hearing that the French had settled in Florida worried and angered the Spanish. Spanish ships hailing from Vera Cruz and Cartegena, hauling gold and silver, rode the Gulf Stream through the Straits of Florida and up the southeast coast of North America. The Spanish worried that the French settlement of La Caroline would leave Spanish treasure ships vulnerable to French raiders.

On September 4, 1564, Pedro Menendez was sent by the Spanish King Phillip II to rid Florida of the French settlers. Ribaut and three hundred French soldiers sailed out to St. Augustine to preempt the attack, but they encountered a hurricane and were blown south. La Carolina was captured on September 20 by Menendez, and almost all of the settlers were massacred on the spot. Luckily, a small ship of French settlers, including Laudonniere and Le Moyne (with all of his notes and paintings in hand), were able to escape before the attack.

Arx Carolina serves as a tribute to the brief French settlement, depicting a scene that exudes all of the busy excitement of the Huguenots’ fresh start in the New World in exquisite detail. The view highlights the strong bond between the Native Americans and the settlers, showing them shaking hands and working along side one another. It also hints at the strength of the French soldiers and naval power at the settlement- gun emplacements litter the fort walls and ships float at the river’s banks. Moreover, the view gives great detail to the ecology of the region. The lithographs from Montanus’ book offer some of the earliest obtainable and recognizable images of the New World. While some argue that Montanus exaggerated the size and architectural sophistication of the cities he depicted, it is undeniable that his images are stunning examples of printmaking at its finest.

To view or purchase Arx Carolina, click here. To view more prints by Montanus, click here.

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