Abstract, Contemporary, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints

2014 Winter Contemporary Show

(L) Persistent Optimism 4b. By Heather McMordie. Stone lithograph with woodcut and mixed media, 2014. Ed. 2/3. Paper size 11 x 10".  (C) Persistent Optimism 2b. By Heather McMordie. Stone lithograph with woodcut and mixed media, 2014. Ed 2/3. Paper size 11 x 10".  (R) Persistent Optimism 4a.  By Heather Mcmordie. Stone lithograph with woodcut and mixed media, 2014. Ed 1/3. Paper size 11 x 10".  LINK.

(Left) Persistent Optimism 4b. (Center) Persistent Optimism 2b. (Right) Persistent Optimism 4a.
By Heather McMordie. Stone lithograph with woodcut and mixed media, 2014. Edition of 3. Paper size 11 x 10″ each. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery’s 2014 Winter Contemporary Show will open on Friday, November 21, 2014 with a free nighttime celebratory reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. Works by thirteen contemporary printmakers, all created within the last two years, were chosen for the show. The prints selected are an impressive and alluring display of the current eclecticism found in contemporary printmaking.  Purposeful and inventive, the prints are successful experiments in medium, color, and scale, and for many of the artists selected, the prints are a deviation from their previous creative propensities. The show will remain on view in the gallery until February 14, 2014.

Harmonious Rhythm I. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/15. Image size 9 5/8 x 12”. LINK.

Harmonious Rhythm I. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/15. Image size 9 5/8 x 12”. LINK.

Highlights include a haunting and mysterious photo intaglio landscape by Dublin-based Nancy Previs and three small mezzotints of the human form by Australian printmaker Cleo Wilkinson, whose printed visages emerge from a velvety black with a tonal richness and striking subtlety.  The exhibit also features three prints from emerging artist Heather McMordie’s new series, Persistent Optimism, an exciting experiment in prints-turned-drawings, each with elements of lithography, woodcut, graphite, colored pencil, and charcoal.

The 2014 Winter Contemporary Show will also showcase several works by local DC printmakers, including an abstract and playful watercolor-based monotype by Philip Bennet, bold screenprint monotypes with woodcut elements by Susan Goldman, and artfully rendered still lifes in etching and aquatint by Jake Muirhead.

Thrush. Jake Muirhead. Softground with drypoint, 2014. A/P. Image size 11 7/8 x 11 7/8". LINK.

Thrush. Jake Muirhead. Softground with drypoint, 2014. A/P. Image size 11 7/8 x 11 7/8″. LINK.

Selected Artists: Philip Bennet, Richard Carleton, Michael Di Cerbo, Eric Goldberg, Susan Goldman,  Su-Li Hung, Robert Kipniss, Mary Manusos, Heather McMordie, Jake Muirhead, Nancy Previs, Richard Sloat, and Cleo Wilkinson.

Splash #2. Philip Bennet. Oil-based ink monotype, 2013. Ed 1/1. Image size 11 x 17".  LINK.

Splash #2. Philip Bennet. Oil-based ink monotype, 2013. Ed 1/1. Image size 11 x 17″. LINK.

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Abstract, Aquatint, Collage, Contemporary, Figurative, Oil Painting, Prints, Woodcut

2013 Winter Contemporary Show

Moonrise Tide.  By Jake Muirhead. Softground and aquatint, 2013.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground and aquatint, 2013.

The Old Print Gallery’s 2013 Winter Contemporary Show will open on Friday, November 15, 2013 with a celebratory nighttime reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. Eleven different artists, who use printmaking as their primary medium for artistic expression, were selected for this show.  The works chosen resonate with skill and intention, and reflect the current eclecticism of contemporary printmaking. The show will remain on view until February 15, 2014.

Highlights include new works by local DC artists Jake Muirhead and Phillip Bennet. Muirhead’s large seascape, Moonrise Tide, offers evidence of the artist’s capable and deliberate draftsmanship. In his smaller still life, Bulb, Muirhead uses flowing delicate lines and subtle aquatint, resulting in a print that feels both intimate and fresh. Philip Bennet’s new abstract works are almost playful with their use of brilliantly saturated colors and suggestive titles, All Seeing Eyes and The First Day.

The First Day. By Philip Bennet. Acrylic painting on paper, 2012.

The First Day. By Philip Bennet. Acrylic painting on paper, 2012.

Sumo Kimono. By Pia Oste-Alexander. Collage, undated.

Sumo Kimono. By Pia Oste-Alexander. Collage, undated.

The 2013 Winter Contemporary Show also highlights several innovative approaches to printmaking. Pia Oste-Alexander’s Sumo Kimono is an artful assemblage of artist painted and printed paper, fabric and found patterns.  The gallery is also excited to showcase two prints from Heather McMordie’s 2013 series Not Made For Each Other. In Not Made For Each Other, woodblocks carved with independently derived imagery are printed on top of one another to create one image out of two. The blocks themselves are not made for use together, but with careful color selection and deliberate compositional choices, a cohesive image emerges. According to the artist, the prints “challenge the preconceived notions of what colors, shapes, and textures should or should not ‘work together’, and demonstrate the ability of an object to adapt in relation to another object.”

Not Made For Each Other V. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013.  *Photographed under glass.

Not Made For Each Other V. By Heather McMordie. Woodcut with hand-cut paper. Printed on BFK Rives paper. 2013. *Photographed under glass.

Selected Artists: Philip Bennet, Eric Goldberg, Susan Goldman, Su-Li Hung, Heather McMordie, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Pia Oste-Alexander, Larry Welo, Art Werger, and Cleo Wilkinson.

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Aquatint, Contemporary, Etching, Prints

Printmaker Eric Goldberg

Deep in the Valley. By Eric Goldberg. Color etching and aquatint, 2006.

Today, we would like to share with our readers the prints of contemporary artist Eric Goldberg. Goldberg was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut in 1946.  He studied at Parsons School of Design and The New School for Social Research before receiving his BFA from New York University and his Masters from New Mexico University.  Goldberg is a master printmaker working in etching and aquatint, with some of his images printed in multi-plate color.  His passion for drawing can be seen in the intricate details of his works and in the subtle, complexity of his patterns.

The Day before Tomorrow. [Grand Central Station.] By Eric Goldberg, color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Goldberg’s work centers on human observation and interaction with their surroundings. A trend in his work is to intentionally split the viewer’s focus between two scenes- one of the public world, and one of the artist’s world. Whether split left and right or top and bottom, we are cognizant of the artist’s location at that specific moment, but also we are allowed into his world- we see what he carries with him and sometimes what his hands are holding.

This bifurcation is exaggerated through his use of color. In his representation of public spaces, human subjects and architecture alike are printed in shadowy blues and sterile grays. Shadows and the ever-present grid lines of the floors and sidewalks give structure and perspective to the surroundings, but the lack of visual contrast indicates the artist’s role of distanced observer, rather than interactive member, within this public sphere.

American Stonehedge. By Eric Goldberg. Etching and aquatint, 2006.

Footbridge Still Life. By Eric Goldberg. Etching and aquatint, 2008.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We sense the artist is engaged more with his private thoughts and personal items he has brought with him into this shared, public space. His own objects are awash with warmer taupes and tans; they have life-like folds and wrinkles, and seem both worn and loved at the same time. When the artist’s hands sneak into the composition, they stay within his private realm, lightly wrapped around his car’s steering wheel or quietly putting pencil to sketchpad.

On the Path. By Eric Goldberg. Etching and aquatint, 2009.

Newer prints by Goldberg forgo the use of split compositions, but maintain the motif of observation. Here we see people in environments both wooded and urban, with cameras pressed to their faces. They are interacting with their surroundings, taking photographs of things around them, yet the interaction is in the singular sense of seeing, rather than touching, exploring, or communicating with things and people around them. Again, questions are raised about the artist’s (be that Goldberg or the photographers in his prints) observational role- is it one of distanced surveillance, close and active interface, or somewhere in-between?

Will Draw for Food. By Eric Goldberg. Etching and aquatint, 2007.

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19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Past/Present, Prints, Wood

Past/Present: The Artist and His Studio

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring images of artists in their studios. Studios are very important and sacred things to a working artist, and for many printmakers, the studio itself becomes a subject in their work. Richard Avedon said “I always prefer to work in the studio. It isolates people from their environment. They become in a sense… symbolic of themselves.”

Image on Top Left: Eastman Johnson’s Studio, Nantucket. Published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine. Wood engraving, c. 1870.

Image on Top Right: Studio. (Peter Platt’s printing studio). By Louis Wolchonok. Etching, 1926.

 

 

 

 

Image on Bottom Left: The Studio Artist. By Eric Goldberg. Etching and aquatint, 2003.

Image on Bottom Right: In the Studio. By Richard Pantell. Etching, 2001.

 

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