18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, 2014 Holiday Gift Guide, 20th Century Maps, American Maps, Aquatint, Chromolithograph, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Copperplate, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Lithograph, Maps, Monotype, Multi-stone Lithograph, Natural History, Naval, Portraits, Prints, Serigraph, Sporting, Wood

2014 Holiday Gift Guide

We are less than a week until Christmas, and if you are like us, you are probably still searching for one or two last-minute gifts for that special someone (or someones!). We have you covered! We have always believed that art makes the BEST gifts. It is meaningful, special, and unlike the go-to Christmas sweater, always the right size. We have prints and maps for all interests, at all price points. Stop by our gallery or visit our website www.oldprintgallery.com to browse our collection of historic, antique, decorative, and fine original art. 

Below is a Holiday Gift Guide for 2014, with ideas for everyone on your list. We hope you enjoy our selections, and if you need more ideas, give us a call or stop by our gallery and we will be happy to help you find something fantastic. Happy shopping and Happy Holidays!

For the Cook:

Summer King Apple. Plate III. E. I. Schutt. Published by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Chromolithograph, 1912. Image size 6 1/4 x 3 3/8" (158 x 85 mm). LINK.  Lithographed by Julius Bien Co. Lith. From the USDA Yearbook. A beautiful chromolithograph of an apple, with a cross section of the apple below.

Summer King Apple. Plate III. E. I. Schutt. Published by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Chromolithograph, 1912. Image size 6 1/4 x 3 3/8″ (158 x 85 mm). LINK.
Lithographed by Julius Bien Co. Lith. From the USDA Yearbook. A beautiful chromolithograph of an apple, with a cross section of the apple below.

For the Sports Fan:

Lacrosse.  "Hard Pressed." T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, Aug 21, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8" (348 x 506 mm.). LINK.  Lacrosse, today a popular team sport in North America, may have developed as early as 1100 AD among indigenous peoples on the continent. By the seventeenth century, it was well-established. It was documented by Jesuit missionary priests in the territory of present-day Canada, although the game has undergone many modifications since that time.

Lacrosse. “Hard Pressed.” T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, Aug 21, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8″ (348 x 506 mm.). LINK.
Lacrosse, today a popular team sport in North America, may have developed as early as 1100 AD among indigenous peoples on the continent. By the seventeenth century, it was well-established. It was documented by Jesuit missionary priests in the territory of present-day Canada, although the game has undergone many modifications since that time.

For the Washingtonian:

Map of Washington, D.C.  George H. Walker. Published by the Walker Lith. & Pub. Co. Boston. Multi-stone lithograph, c.1900. Image size 21 1/2 x 26 1/4" plus margins. LINK.   A pleasant view of the city from the turn of the last century. Outlined in red are the many trolley lines that once ran in the city and suburbs. The Walker Co. was formed in 1880 by George Hiram Walker and his brother Oscar.  They were very prolific, publishing maps, atlases and bird's eye views of New England locales.  The Walkers were the last of Boston's important lithographers.  President George  Bush is a descendant of this family.

Map of Washington, D.C. George H. Walker. Published by the Walker Lith. & Pub. Co. Boston. Multi-stone lithograph, c.1900. Image size 21 1/2 x 26 1/4″ plus margins. LINK.
A pleasant view of the city from the turn of the last century. Outlined in red are the many trolley lines that once ran in the city and suburbs. The Walker Co. was formed in 1880 by George Hiram Walker and his brother Oscar. They were very prolific, publishing maps, atlases, and bird’s eye views of New England and East Coast locales. The Walkers were the last of Boston’s important lithographers. President George Bush is a descendant of this family.

For the World Traveler:

Encampment of the Travellers. By Karl Bodmer. Published by Ackermann & Co., London. Aquatint engraving, 1843-44. Image size 7 1/2 x 11" (190 x 290 mm) plus title and margins. From "Travels in the Interior of North America"  by Maximilian, Prince of Wied-Neuwied.  In 1832, the German prince, Maximilian of Wied, organized an expedition to explore the region along the Missouri River.  He was accompanied by Karl Bodmer, a young Swiss artist, who recorded in pictorial form all he observed.  Following the Lewis & Clark trail up the Missouri River, they traveled 5,000 miles during the course of a year.  Maximilian kept detailed notes on a day-by-day basis for his book, which was published six years later in German, French, and English editions and included Bodmer's aquatint engravings.  Karl Bodmer's landscapes, portraits, and splendid scenes of Indian life are regarded today as first rate picture histories of the western frontier at that time. Engraved by Outhwaite.  Printed by de Bougeard. LINK.

Encampment of the Travellers. By Karl Bodmer. Published by Ackermann & Co., London. Aquatint engraving, 1843-44. Image size 7 1/2 x 11″ (190 x 290 mm) plus title and margins. LINK.
From “Travels in the Interior of North America” by Maximilian, Prince of Wied-Neuwied. In 1832, the German prince, Maximilian of Wied, organized an expedition to explore the region along the Missouri River. He was accompanied by Karl Bodmer, a young Swiss artist, who recorded in pictorial form all he observed. Following the Lewis & Clark trail up the Missouri River, they traveled 5,000 miles during the course of a year. Maximilian kept detailed notes on a day-by-day basis for his book, which was published six years later in German, French, and English editions and included Bodmer’s aquatint engravings. Karl Bodmer’s landscapes, portraits, and splendid scenes of Indian life are regarded today as first rate picture histories of the western frontier at that time. Engraved by Outhwaite. Printed by de Bougeard.

For the History-Buff:

John Paul Jones. C. J. Notte. Published by  Carl Guttenberg, Paris. Engraving, 1780. Image size 10 11/16 x 9 1/16”, plus publication line and margins. LINK.  Title continues: "Commodore au Service des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique...". Engraved by Carl Guttenberg. John Paul Jones( 1747-1792) was an American naval officer, famous for his exploits in British waters during the American Revolution. As captain of the Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones fought an epic battle against Captain Pearson’s ship Serapis. It is during this battle that he uttered his famous words "I have not yet begun to fight". The engraving shows Jones on the deck of ship, dramatically emerging from smoke and musket fire. Although the engraver, Carl Guttenberg, was from Nuremberg, he lived in France and like many French at the time, was deeply connected to the American cause. The French admired Jones for his heroism and celebrated his success, making this print popular not only in America, but France as well.

John Paul Jones. C. J. Notte. Published by Carl Guttenberg, Paris. Engraving, 1780. Image size 10 11/16 x 9 1/16”, plus publication line and margins. LINK.
Title continues: “Commodore au Service des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique…”. Engraved by Carl Guttenberg. John Paul Jones (1747-1792) was an American naval officer, famous for his exploits in British waters during the American Revolution. As captain of the Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones fought an epic battle against Captain Pearson’s ship Serapis. It is during this battle that he uttered his famous words “I have not yet begun to fight”. The engraving shows Jones on the deck of ship, dramatically emerging from smoke and musket fire. Although the engraver, Carl Guttenberg, was from Nuremberg, he lived in France and like many French at the time, was deeply connected to the American cause. The French admired Jones for his heroism and celebrated his success, making this print popular not only in America, but in France as well.

For the Nature-Lover:

a. Cardamomum munis Cardamoe. b. Cardamonum longum vel medium. N. 306. (Cardamom). Johann W. Weinmann. Published Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-45. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8 inches. LINK. From Johann Wilhelm Weinmann's Phytanthoza Iconographia. This beautiful work provides a nearly complete record of the flowers, fruits and vegetables cultivated in the early 18th century. The plates are among the earliest examples of color printing from a single plate.

a. Cardamomum munis Cardamoe. b. Cardamonum longum vel medium. N. 306. (Cardamom). Johann W. Weinmann. Published Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-45. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8 inches. LINK.
From Johann Wilhelm Weinmann’s “Phytanthoza Iconographia.” This beautiful work provides a nearly complete record of the flowers, fruits and vegetables cultivated in the early 18th century. The plates are among the earliest examples of color printing from a single plate.

For the Map Enthusiast:

A Map of the Most Inhabited part of Virginia containing the whole Province of Maryland with Part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina. Drawn by Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson in 1775. Printed for Robt. Sayer at No. 53 in Fleet Street. Copper plate engraving, c.1777. Four-sheet map, joined into two sheets. Overall, if joined, 31 x 48 1/4. LINK.   This important map of Virginia was commissioned by the English Lords of Trade, who in 1750 required each colony to conduct a comprehensive survey. Joshua Fry, a mathematician, and Peter Jefferson, a surveyor and father of Thomas Jefferson, were appointed to execute the commission. The resulting map is highly detailed, giving roads, ferry crossings, settlements and names of many of the rivers and creeks. It is also the first map to depict the general configuration of the Appalachian and Allegheny mountain ranges. The cartouche depicts an image of the Virginia tobacco trade. The map was first issued in 1751. Other editions were done in 1755 onward through 1794. This particular map is from the 1775 edition and likely appeared in Thomas Jefferys' "The American Atlas."

A Map of the Most Inhabited part of Virginia containing the whole Province of Maryland with Part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina. Drawn by Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson in 1775. Printed for Robt. Sayer at No. 53 in Fleet Street. Copper plate engraving, c.1777. Four-sheet map, joined into two sheets. Overall, if joined, 31 x 48 1/4. LINK.
This important map of Virginia was commissioned by the English Lords of Trade, who in 1750 required each colony to conduct a comprehensive survey. Joshua Fry, a mathematician, and Peter Jefferson, a surveyor and father of Thomas Jefferson, were appointed to execute the commission. The resulting map is highly detailed, giving roads, ferry crossings, settlements and names of many of the rivers and creeks. It is also the first map to depict the general configuration of the Appalachian and Allegheny mountain ranges. The cartouche depicts an image of the Virginia tobacco trade. The map was first issued in 1751. Other editions were done in 1755 onward through 1794. This particular map is from the 1775 edition and likely appeared in Thomas Jefferys’ “The American Atlas.”

For the Kids:

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew.  Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2 inches. LINK.  Edition of 55. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. A fanciful image of a boat, castle, and friendly creatures. printed in beautiful colors.

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2 inches. LINK.
Edition of 55. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. A fanciful image of a boat, castle, and friendly creatures. Printed in three beautiful colors.

For the City-Slicker:

Gotham Lights. Michael Di Cerbo. Etching, aquatint, and drypoint, 2005. Image size 11 7/8 x 8 13/16 inches. LINK.  Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil by artist. Micahel DiCerbo is a NEw York City based artist. Di Cerbo has turned his sense of urban grandeur into geometric forms with patterns of light and dark that allude to the soaring architecture of skyscrapers. One sees the city from the perspective of both an ant and eagle, moving endlessly upward or falling away to infinite chasms below. The images, though devoid of people and any overt sign of life, create an ambiance of mystery. One may find themselves alone in a composition as an observer of a timeless cityscape.

Gotham Lights. Michael Di Cerbo. Etching, aquatint, and drypoint, 2005. Image size 11 7/8 x 8 13/16 inches. LINK.
Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil by artist. Micahel DiCerbo is a NEw York City based artist. Di Cerbo has turned his sense of urban grandeur into geometric forms with patterns of light and dark that allude to the soaring architecture of skyscrapers. One sees the city from the perspective of both an ant and eagle, moving endlessly upward or falling away to infinite chasms below. The images, though devoid of people and any overt sign of life, create an ambiance of mystery. One may find themselves alone in a composition as an observer of a timeless citiscape.

For the Contemporary:

Dreamscape #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2010. Image size 13 3/4 x 9 7/8 inches. LINK. Signed and titled in pencil by the artist. Ed 1/1. Bennet’s medium of choice is the monotype, abstract and dynamic images achieved as a result of his playful and liberal approach to printmaking. He experiments with colored inks of varied viscosity, often employing hued “ghost” images as backgrounds for new prints and integrating multiple plates into each composition. His unrestricted and unique working style allows for a spontaneity and creative freedom not normally associated with printmaking.

Dreamscape #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2010. Image size 13 3/4 x 9 7/8 inches. LINK.
Signed and titled in pencil by the artist. Ed 1/1. Bennet’s medium of choice is the monotype, abstract and dynamic images achieved as a result of his playful and liberal approach to printmaking. He experiments with colored inks of varied viscosity, often employing hued “ghost” images as backgrounds for new prints and integrating multiple plates into each composition. His unrestricted and unique working style allows for a spontaneity and creative freedom not normally associated with printmaking.

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19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Engraving, Genre, Lithograph, Oil Painting, Prints, Stipple

Election Day

Happy Midterm Election Day! In honor of this very important day in our political process, we are sharing three prints by George Caleb Bingham.

The County Election. George Caleb Bingham. Published by Goupil & Co., New York, Paris, London. Stipple and line engraving,1854. Engraved by John Sartain. Image size 22 1/4 x 30" (564 x 760 mm) plus wide margins. LINK.

The County Election. George Caleb Bingham. Published by Goupil & Co., New York, Paris, London. Stipple and line engraving,1854. Engraved by John Sartain. Image size 22 1/4 x 30″ (564 x 760 mm) plus wide margins. At The Old Print Shop: LINK.

George Caleb Bingham is considered by many to be America’s finest genre painter. A number of his printed images, such as the one above, have a political theme. In 1840, Bingham was sent to the Whig convention at Rocheport, Missouri. It is believed that at the convention Bingham realized the artistic possibilities of the political scene and filled his drawing book up with sketches, which were later utilized for his large compositions. The other two large companion scenes to The County Election are Stump Speaking and the extremely rare Verdict of the People.

Stump Speaking. By George Caleb Bingham. Published by Fishel, Adler and Schwartz, 94 Fulton St., New York. Hand-colored stipple, line, and aquatint engraving, 1856. Engraved by Gautier. Image size 22 5/16 x 30" plus title and margins. LINK.

Stump Speaking. By George Caleb Bingham. Published by Fishel, Adler, and Schwartz, 94 Fulton St., New York. Hand-colored stipple, line, and aquatint engraving, 1856. Engraved by Gautier. Image size 22 5/16 x 30″ plus title and margins. At The Old Print Gallery: LINK.

The Verdict of the People. By George Caleb Bingham. Lithograph, 1858-59. Paper size 21 5/8 x 29 3/4" (549 x 755 mm). E. Maurice Bloch in George Caleb Bingham: A Catalogue Raisonne states that only two impressions of this print are known and both are proofs before title.  The two known impressions in the 1967 catalogue were in the collection of Mrs. A. S. Colgate of Tuxedo Park, N.Y. (that impression is currently in the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Texas) and in the Estate of Curtis B. Rollins, Columbia, Missouri (location of that impression is unknown).

The Verdict of the People. By George Caleb Bingham. Lithograph, 1858-59. Paper size 21 5/8 x 29 3/4″ (549 x 755 mm). E. Maurice Bloch in George Caleb Bingham: A Catalogue Raisonne states that only two impressions of this print are known and both are proofs before title. The two known impressions in the 1967 catalogue were in the collection of Mrs. A. S. Colgate of Tuxedo Park, N.Y. (that impression is currently in the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Texas) and in the Estate of Curtis B. Rollins, Columbia, Missouri (location of that impression is unknown).

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19th Century Prints, Copperplate, Engraving, New Additions, Prints, Steel plate engraving

New Additions: Decorative Lettering

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added several beautiful prints from an 1880 engraved book of penmanship and lettering. Each page offers sumptuous script examples, ranging from the traditional to the ornate to the quirky. Lettering has a long tradition in books and prints- some of the earliest examples of ornamental script come from medieval and renaissance illuminated manuscripts. In the Victorian era, penmanship, calligraphy, and decorative lettering were taught in schools. Publications like this one gave interested students of script examples of lavish and lush type. The prints featured today are typographic gems, with the slightly slopping letters of calligraphy mixed in with  blocky, Gothic blackletter examples. A true gem is the print of two “Rustic Alphabets”, designed by Daniel T. Ames and Charles Rollinson. Curled leaves and twisted tree trunks transform into lower and uppercase alphabet letters, which are populated with small, sweet birds flying from letter to letter. We also added several engraved certificates, which are prime examples of vintage handwritten script and engraved decorative elements co-existing on one page. Hope you enjoy!

Specimens. Engraving, 1880. Image size 11 x 8 1/2" (282 x 218 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A page of examples of lettering. Good condition. LINK.

Specimens. Engraving, 1880. Image size 11 x 8 1/2″ (282 x 218 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A page of examples of lettering. Good condition. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Specimens. Engraving, 1880. Image size 11 x 8 1/2" (282 x 218 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A page of examples of lettering. Good condition. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Specimens. Engraving, 1880. Image size 11 x 8 1/2″ (282 x 218 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A page of examples of lettering. Good condition. LINK.

Designs for Book Marking.  Page 44. Engraving, 1880.Image size 11 1/2 x 9" (295 x 230 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  Four examples of ornately lettered book markers. LINK.

Designs for Book Marking. Page 44. Engraving, 1880.Image size 11 1/2 x 9″ (295 x 230 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. Four examples of ornately lettered book markers. LINK.

Rustic Alphabet by Daniel T. Ames.  Rustic Alphabet by Charles Rollinson. Engraving, 1880. Image size 11 1/2 x 8 3/4" (294 x 225 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  Two decorative alphabets are pictured. LINK.

Rustic Alphabet by Daniel T. Ames. Rustic Alphabet by Charles Rollinson. Engraving, 1880. Image size 11 1/2 x 8 3/4″ (294 x 225 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. Two decorative alphabets are pictured. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Rustic Alphabet by Daniel T. Ames.  Rustic Alphabet by Charles Rollinson. Engraving, 1880. Image size 11 1/2 x 8 3/4" (294 x 225 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  Two decorative alphabets are pictured. LINK.

(DETAIL OF)
Rustic Alphabet by Daniel T. Ames. Rustic Alphabet by Charles Rollinson. Engraving, 1880. Image size 11 1/2 x 8 3/4″ (294 x 225 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. Two decorative alphabets are pictured. LINK.

Souvenir....   Page 48. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 1/2 x 8 1/2" (268 x 217 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A page of words and letters in ornate lettering styles. LINK.

Souvenir…. Page 48. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 1/2 x 8 1/2″ (268 x 217 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A page of words and letters in ornate lettering styles. LINK.

(DETAIL OF)  Souvenir....   Page 48. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 1/2 x 8 1/2" (268 x 217 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A page of words and letters in ornate lettering styles. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Souvenir…. Page 48. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 1/2 x 8 1/2″ (268 x 217 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A page of words and letters in ornate lettering styles. LINK.

I.O.O.F. Grand Encampment State of New York... City of Rochester Aug. 24th 1876...Francis Rogers... Engraving, 1876. Image size 11 1/8 x 9" oval (284 x 227 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A certificate of thanks to Francis Rogers for the "courteous manner in which he discharged his duties" as the Grand Patriarch. LINK.

I.O.O.F. Grand Encampment State of New York… City of Rochester Aug. 24th 1876…Francis Rogers. Engraving, 1876. Image size 11 1/8 x 9″ oval (284 x 227 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A certificate of thanks to Francis Rogers for the “courteous manner in which he discharged his duties” as the Grand Patriarch. LINK.

(DETAIL OF)  I.O.O.F. Grand Encampment State of New York... City of Rochester Aug. 24th 1876...Francis Rogers... Engraving, 1876. Image size 11 1/8 x 9" oval (284 x 227 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A certificate of thanks to Francis Rogers for the "courteous manner in which he discharged his duties" as the Grand Patriarch. LINK.

(DETAIL OF)
I.O.O.F. Grand Encampment State of New York… City of Rochester Aug. 24th 1876…Francis Rogers… Engraving, 1876. Image size 11 1/8 x 9″ oval (284 x 227 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A certificate of thanks to Francis Rogers for the “courteous manner in which he discharged his duties” as the Grand Patriarch. LINK.

(DETAIL OF)  I.O.O.F. Grand Encampment State of New York... City of Rochester Aug. 24th 1876...Francis Rogers... Engraving, 1876. Image size 11 1/8 x 9" oval (284 x 227 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A certificate of thanks to Francis Rogers for the "courteous manner in which he discharged his duties" as the Grand Patriarch. LINK.

(DETAIL OF)
I.O.O.F. Grand Encampment State of New York… City of Rochester Aug. 24th 1876…Francis Rogers… Engraving, 1876. Image size 11 1/8 x 9″ oval (284 x 227 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A certificate of thanks to Francis Rogers for the “courteous manner in which he discharged his duties” as the Grand Patriarch. LINK.

City of New York... Hon. Jordan L. Mott... Board of Aldermen... Jan. 5th, 1880... Engraving,1880. Image size 11 1/8 x 9" oval (284 x 227 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A certificate of thanks for service as an alderman in 1879. LINK.

City of New York… Hon. Jordan L. Mott… Board of Aldermen… Jan. 5th, 1880. Engraving,1880. Image size 11 1/8 x 9″ oval (284 x 227 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A certificate of thanks for service as an alderman in 1879. LINK.

Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title)  Page 41. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8" (255 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  An exquisitely decorative alphabet is pictured. LINK.

Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title) Page 41. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8″ (255 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. An exquisitely decorative alphabet is pictured. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title)  Page 41. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8" (255 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  An exquisitely decorative alphabet is pictured. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title) Page 41. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8″ (255 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. An exquisitely decorative alphabet is pictured. LINK.

Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title)  Page 43. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8" (225 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A decorative alphabet with very ornamental letters below. LINK.

Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title) Page 43. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8″ (225 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A decorative alphabet with very ornamental letters below. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title)  Page 43. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8" (225 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A decorative alphabet with very ornamental letters below. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title) Page 43. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8″ (225 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A decorative alphabet with very ornamental letters below. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title)  Page 43. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8" (225 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship.  A decorative alphabet with very ornamental letters below. LINK.

(DETAIL OF) Decorative Alphabet. (Supplied title) Page 43. Engraving, 1880. Image size 10 x 8″ (225 x 204 mm). From a book of lettering and penmanship. A decorative alphabet with very ornamental letters below. LINK.

 

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18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Chromolithograph, Engraving, Etching, Fashion, Lithograph, Mezzotint, Portraits, Prints, Science, Stipple

Ballooning Prints

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L'Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851.  Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783.  A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16" (47.4 x 67.1 cm). LINK.

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L’Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851. Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783. A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16″ (47.4 x 67.1 cm).

Of all the experimental and intellectual developments in the 18th century, none captivated both scientists and the general public more than balloon travel. Ballooning played an important part in early aeronautical development,  the limitless expanse of sky beckoning scientists with hopes of exploration, excitement, and inexhaustible possibility. The first trepidatious voyages were described in eager and precise detail, and often included maps and diagrams of scientific observations. Early etchings and engravings were also made to capture the discoveries and milestones made by the scientists, explorers, and daredevils who braved the air. Below are several of our ballooning prints, selected from both our Georgetown and New York galleries. Be sure to click on the links to see more for our inventory.

Details Geometriques de la Machine Aerostatique... Monsieur Jos. Montgolfier, le 19 June 1784. A Lyon chez Joubert fils, Graveur et Md. D'Estampes, G de rue Merciere. Etching, 1784. LINK.

Details Geometriques de la Machine Aerostatique… Monsieur Jos. Montgolfier, le 19 June 1784. A Lyon chez Joubert fils, Graveur et Md. D’Estampes, G de rue Merciere. Etching, 1784.

The first clearly recorded instance of a balloon carrying (human) passengers was built by the brothers Joseph-Michel and Jacques-Etienne Montgolfier in Annonay, France. These brothers came from a family of paper manufacturers and had noticed ash rising in paper fires, which led to their experiments with balloon travel. The Montgolfier brothers gave their first public demonstration of their invention on June 4, 1783. They stood on a circular platform attached to the bottom of the balloon and  hand-fed the fire through openings on either side of the balloon’s skirt. The balloon reached an altitude of at least 500 feet and traveled about 5½ miles before landing safely 25 minutes later.  Later that year, scientists Jacques Alexander Charles and Nicholas Louis Robert created the first gas-balloon, utilizing hydrogen to keep the balloon and basket afloat for a significantly longer period of time.  Within the next ten years, numerous daredevils risked the skies with the help of silk balloons, wicker baskets, and new concoctions of gas and flame.

By 1785, the first successful crossing of the English Channel was accomplished by French balloonist Jean-Pierre Blanchard and American John Jeffries, using a gas balloon. They started in Dover, but once they were positioned over the water, the balloon lost altitude. The pair feverishly tossed all items from the basket, including their clothes. They landed safely in France two hours later, in nothing but their underwear.

Mr. Vincent Lunardi Esquire. Stipple engraving, 1784. Oval size 4 3/4 x 4 " ( 122 x 102 mm). LINK.

Mr. Vincent Lunardi Esquire. Stipple engraving, 1784. Oval size 4 3/4 x 4 ” ( 122 x 102 mm).

Most of early balloon flight and exploration occurred in France, with backing provided by the Académie Royale des Sciences. England was slow to catch on to the ballooning phenomenon. The first manned balloon flight in England was by Signor Vincent Lunardi, an Italian, who ascended from Moorfields on September 15, 1784. His gas balloon was outfitted with wooden oars, with the intended purpose of directional control. Fueled by the fervor surrounding Lunardi’s first flight in London, ballooning finally became a veritable craze in England. Aeronauts became the some of the most talked about celebrities of the day, and tales of their exploits and adventures swept across Britain creating a national mania for the sport. Whereas ballooning had been popular on the Continent since Pilatre and Rozier’s first flight in a “Montgolfiere”, it was not until Lunardi’s daring flight that it gained popularity in England.

Exact Representation of the Grand Aerostatick Machine with which Mr. Lunardi ascended from the Artillery Ground Sep. 15 1784. Published by W. Wells, Sep. 28 1784, at No. 132, Fleet Street. Etching, handcolored,1784. Image size 12 x 8 3/4" (305 x 224 mm). LINK.

Exact Representation of the Grand Aerostatick Machine with which Mr. Lunardi ascended from the Artillery Ground Sep. 15 1784. Published by W. Wells, Sep. 28 1784, at No. 132, Fleet Street. Etching, handcolored,1784. Image size 12 x 8 3/4″ (305 x 224 mm).

James Sadler Esq. First English Aeronaut. By Benjamin Taylor. Published by B. Taylor, No. 7 Brewer St. Golden Sq., London. Stipple engraving, 1812. 5 1/2 x 6 1/4" (140 x 160 mm) plus title and margins. LINK.

James Sadler Esq. First English Aeronaut. By Benjamin Taylor. Published by B. Taylor, No. 7 Brewer St. Golden Sq., London. Stipple engraving, 1812. 5 1/2 x 6 1/4″ (140 x 160 mm) plus title and margins.

Nicknamed the “King of the Balloon”, James Sadler was considered the first English aeronaut. He made his first balloon ascent in 1784, the same years as Lunardi’s famous flight, flying from Oxford to the village of Woodeaton, six miles away. On October 7, 1811, he set a balloon speed record when he flew from Birmingham to Boston, Lincolnshire, in less than four hours. In 1812, he attempted to cross the Irish Sea, but failed, landing in the ocean near Anglesey where he was rescued by a passing fishing boat. Sadler is remembered as one of the pioneers of aeronautical exploration in Britain and his daring flights helped make ballooning a national pastime.

A view of the Balloon of Mr. Sadler's. : This Balloon Ascended with Mr. Sadler and Captain Paget of the Royal Navy : from the Mermaid Gardens at Hackney in Middlesex at three O'clock on Monday afternoon August the 12th 1811 and descended in a field. Engraving, c.1811. Image size 16 15/16 x 13 7/8" (415 x 354 mm). LINK.

A view of the Balloon of Mr. Sadler’s. : This Balloon Ascended with Mr. Sadler and Captain Paget of the Royal Navy : from the Mermaid Gardens at Hackney in Middlesex at three O’clock on Monday afternoon August the 12th 1811 and descended in a field. Engraving, c.1811. Image size 16 15/16 x 13 7/8″ (415 x 354 mm).

Part of the Balloon with which Mr. Sadler ascended from Dublin, Octr. 1, 1812. : passed over upwards 237 Miles by Water, and 40 by Land, and descended at Sea. Robert Havell, Jr. Aquatint and engraving handcolored, undated, c.1812. Image size 13 1/4 x 9 1/8" (337 x 230 mm).LINK.

Part of the Balloon with which Mr. Sadler ascended from Dublin, Octr. 1, 1812. : passed over upwards 237 Miles by Water, and 40 by Land, and descended at Sea. By Robert Havell, Jr. Aquatint and engraving handcolored, undated, c.1812. Image size 13 1/4 x 9 1/8″ (337 x 230 mm).

Charles Green was another celebrated English aeronaut, He was the first person to undertake an ascent in a balloon filled with carbureted hydrogen gas. Green made 526 ascents during the course of his daring career, many of which tested the boundaries of aeronautical aviation. An eccentric at heart, Green made an ascent off the back of his pony, a feat which won him a reputation as daredevil. He constructed the great Nassau balloon, in which he made his famous ascent from Vauxhall Gardens. In 1821, Green was the first aeronaut to demonstrate that coal-gas could be used to inflate balloons. Prior to this discovery, volatile hydrogen gas had been used which was extremely expensive and took up to two days to inflate a large balloon. Green also invented the guide-rope, which was used to regulate the ascent and descent of the balloon.

Mr. Charles Green, The Aeronaut. By John Hollins. Published by Hodgson & Graves, London. Mezzotint, 1838. Engraved by  G. T. Payne. 15 9/16 x 12 1/2" (395 x 317 mm) plus title and wide margins. LINK.

Mr. Charles Green, The Aeronaut. By John Hollins. Published by Hodgson & Graves, London. Mezzotint, 1838. Engraved by G. T. Payne. 15 9/16 x 12 1/2″ (395 x 317 mm) plus title and wide margins.

Ballooning became a significant part of popular culture. Spectators would gather to watch the balloons take off and land. Fashion houses drew inspiration from the lauded air explorers. The wealthy that could afford such luxuries would take trips in balloons. Once made maneuverable, balloons were even used by militaries. The first military use of a balloon occurred during the Battle of Fleures in 1784. The balloon L’Entrprenant was used by French Aerostatic Corps to watch the movements of the Coalition Army.

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L'Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851.  Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783.  A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16" (47.4 x 67.1 cm). LINK.

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L’Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851. Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783. A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16″ (47.4 x 67.1 cm).

The Ascension of Mr, and Mrs, Graham, in the Great Magnificent Balloon. Engraving, 1824. Printed below the image states "Mr. Graham, having announced that he would ascend yesterday from White Conduit House, Pentonville, in part for the benefit of the widow of the late unfortunate Mr. Harris, immense crowds occupied all the grounds in the vicinity at an early hour, and the Garden itself was filled with large numbers of paying visitors." Image size 13 1/4 x 8 1/2" (337 x 217 mm). LINK.

The Ascension of Mr, and Mrs, Graham, in the Great Magnificent Balloon. Engraving, 1824. Printed below the image states “Mr. Graham, having announced that he would ascend yesterday from White Conduit House, Pentonville, in part for the benefit of the widow of the late unfortunate Mr. Harris, immense crowds occupied all the grounds in the vicinity at an early hour, and the Garden itself was filled with large numbers of paying visitors.” Image size 13 1/4 x 8 1/2″ (337 x 217 mm).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bataille de Fleurus (26 Juin 1794). Engraving, hand-colored. c.1830. Pellerin & Co., imp-edit. Imagerie D'Epinal No.178.   Image depicts the French military with a balloon tethered in the backgrounds. Image size 7 7/8 x 12 15/16" (200 x 328 mm). LINK.

Bataille de Fleurus (26 Juin 1794). Engraving, hand-colored. c.1830. Pellerin & Co., imp-edit. Imagerie D’Epinal No.178. Image depicts the French military with a balloon tethered in the backgrounds. Image size 7 7/8 x 12 15/16″ (200 x 328 mm).

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18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: Maps of the South

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing maps of the Southeastern United States, recently added to our OPG inventory. Dating from 1790s to 1850s, these maps offer a significant look into the burgeoning growth of our fledgling nation, as conflict, population shifts, and advances in transportation modes created a constant demand for the most up-to-date cartographic information. These maps also are all beautiful examples of American map and atlas publishing, which had its advent with Carey’s “American Atlas” and continued strong into the 19th and 20th century- with vibrant publishing hubs located in New York City, Philadelphia, and Boston. We hope you enjoy these maps!

Map of Florida. By S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., Philadephia. Engraving, hand colored, 1853. Image size 14 3/8 x 11 1/2, plus margins. Good condition, save for some faint damp staining in the lower right. Original hand coloring. LINK.

Map of Florida. By S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., Philadephia. Engraving, hand colored, 1853. Image size 14 3/8 x 11 1/2, plus margins. Good condition, save for some faint damp staining in the lower right. Original hand coloring. LINK.

A fine map of Florida from Mitchell’s “A New Universal Atlas containing maps of the various Empires, Kingdoms, States and Republics of the World.” This map shows Florida is in its fifth year as a state of the Union. Inset maps in the lower  left include plans of Pensacola, Tallahassee, and the Harbor of St. Augustine. The map also includes a distance chart for water routes from place to place.

Plan of the Siege of Savannah. Published by Charles Smith, New York. Engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Copper plate engraving, 1796-97. Images size 8 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Plan of the Siege of Savannah. Published by Charles Smith, New York. Engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Copper plate engraving, 1796-97. Images size 8 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

A rare and detailed battle plan of the city and surroundings of Savannah Georgia. This map appeared in “The Monthly Military Repository, Respectfully Inscribed to the Military of the United States of America.” The “Repository” is an interesting early work. It was published in parts over a span of two years. Smith included instruction on military strategy, conduct, and clothing, extracting from histories of European wars and descriptions of American Revolutionary battles. Most of the descriptions for the American battles were taken from the writings of Baron Steuben and Gen. Horatio Gates. Included were a series of revolutionary battle plans based on those published in London by William Faden. This particular map was engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Almost all the recorded copies of “Repository” are incomplete, lacking one or more maps.

Georgia, from the latest Authorities. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Images size 8 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition save for small area of paper fill in upper left margin, not affecting the image. Black & white. LINK/

Georgia, from the latest Authorities. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Images size 8 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition save for small area of paper fill in upper left margin, not affecting the image. Black & white. LINK.

Engraved by W. Barker for Carey’s “American Atlas…”, the earliest atlas of America produced in America. This is the first edition of one of the earliest obtainable maps of the state of Georgia. The state is shown extending to the Mississippi River and shows portions of East and West Florida and “Tennassee Government.” Noted prominently are native Indian tribes, Chicasaws, Chacataws, Cherokees, Natches, Seminoles and Creeks.

The State of South Carolina from the best Authorities, by Samuel Lewis. 1795. By Samuel Lewis. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Image size 15 3/4 x 17 1/4" plus margins. Fair to good condition. The map was at one time folded and has splits and tiny areas of paper loss along fold lines. Professionally repaired. Black & white. LINK.

The State of South Carolina from the best Authorities, by Samuel Lewis. 1795. By Samuel Lewis. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Image size 15 3/4 x 17 1/4″ plus margins. Fair to good condition. The map was at one time folded and has splits and tiny areas of paper loss along fold lines. Professionally repaired. Black & white. LINK.

This is another fine 18th century map from Carey’s “American Atlas….”, the first atlas published in America. It was engraved by W. Barker. The map shows remarkable topographic detail, and a fairly solid and accurate representation of South Carolina’s river systems. This is a “must-buy” for any South Carolina collector, especially one interested in the state’s significant Federalist period.

 

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