Drawing, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Prints, Sporting

Abe Blashko on Point of View

Market Vendors. Abe Blashko. Lithograph, 1940. Edition 53. Image size 19 3/4 x 12 3/8" (500 x 315 mm). LINK.

Market Vendors. Abe Blashko. Lithograph, 1940. Edition 53. Image size 19 3/4 x 12 3/8″ (500 x 315 mm). LINK.

“The turbulent social and political events of the 1930s were major contributors to my early development of a point of view. I was able to feel the pulse of that period and was fascinated with the faces and activities of the people around me, a fascination with their work, play, determination, strength, greed and evil.” Abe Blashko

Market. Abe Blashko. Graphite drawing with chalk highlights, 1937. Image size 13 1/2 x 20 3/4" (343 x 528 mm). LINK.

Market. Abe Blashko. Graphite drawing with chalk highlights, 1937.
Image size 13 1/2 x 20 3/4″ (343 x 528 mm). LINK.

The Pencil Vendor. Abe Blashko. Graphite drawing, 1937. Image size 22 3/4 x 13 3/8" (526 x 304 mm). LINK.

The Pencil Vendor. Abe Blashko. Graphite drawing, 1937. Image size 22 3/4 x 13 3/8″ (526 x 304 mm). LINK.

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Bronze, Drawing, Gallery Event, Gallery Openings, Sculpture, Steel

Artist Reception Today

ROBERT COOK and MASAAKI NODA Sculpture and Drawings

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Artist Reception & Opening Party 

Saturday, May 10, 2014

from 1:00- 4:00 pm

At the old print shop

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Bronze, Drawing, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Sculpture, Steel

Soaring into Three Dimensions

The Old Print Shop presents a show of SCULPTURE and DRAWINGS by Robert Cook and Masaaki Noda

May 10 – June 27

Opening Reception Saturday, May 10, from 1-4pm

Long-known as a prominent resource for prints and works on paper, our partner, The Old Print Shop in NYC, is expanding its repertoire with an exhibit of two artists, each notably accomplished in the discipline of sculpture. The street-level gallery, recently created to show contemporary art, has been further configured to accommodate this show.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Cook was born in Boston in 1921. He studied with George Demetrios, a classical sculptor. During WWII he served in Europe as an engineer making maps and models. After the war he stayed in Paris to study with Marcel Gaumont at L’Academie des Beaux Arts. In 1948 he moved to Rome. He is an innovator in the “lost wax” process of casting, creating larger sculptures than had previously been possible. He has a number of major public sculptures in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Saudi Arabia, Italy and Canberra, Australia. His work, “Dinoceras,” is in New York at Park Avenue and 51st Street. His works are in the Victoria and Albert Museum, The British Museum, the Hirshorn Collection, the Whitney Museum and the Mobile Museum of Art. He draws inspiration for his sculptures from dance, theater, sports and animals. Jazz music infuses his studio as he works.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995. Link.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995.

Masaaki Noda was born in Hiroshima, Japan, in 1949. He studied at Osaka University of Arts, and in 1977 he came to the United States and studied at The Art Students League. He pursues sculpture in a unique way, making paper and clay models until he has the exact design he is seeking. He has had numerous public installations in Japan, Greece, and China, including an exhibition of his work at the Shenzhen Museum of Art in China. His work is in numerous public collections including the Brooklyn Museum, Fukuyama Museum of Art in Japan, Hiroshima Perfectural Art Museum, Portland Art Museum, Philadelphia Museum of Art and Shenzhen Museum of Art. Masaaki draws inspiration from the artistic conflict between form and abstraction.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

For more information on this show, go to The Old Print Shop website: www.oldprintshop.com.

If you are in the New York area, we invite you to come and see the show. Both artists will be at the opening reception on Saturday, May 10th from 1 till 4 pm. Masaaki Noda will be there in person and Robert Cook will attend from Italy, via Skype.

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Charcoal, Collagraph, Contemporary, Drawing, Gallery Event, Prints

Clare Romano and John Ross: Collagraphs and Drawings of the Southwest

Grand Canyon by Clare Romano. Collagraph, 1975.

The Old Print Shop has a contemporary exhibit on view now, Clare Romano and John Ross: Collagraphs and Drawings of the Southwest. Clare and John met while studying at Cooper Union in the early 1940’s. They were married in 1943, just before John went to Italy during WWII. It is unusual for two married artists to have such highly acclaimed individual careers, but they have managed to make a name for themselves though their writing, printmaking technique, and art.

They wrote, published, and illustrated several books together, the first being Manhattan Island in 1957. One of the most important publications was The Complete Printmaker, published by Macmillan in 1972 and updated and reprinted for decades.

Buttes by John Ross. Collagraph.

Both artists were professors at several colleges and universities over their careers. Clare Romano taught at the Art Center of Northern NJ from 1960-1965, New School University, NYC from 1960-1973, Pratt Graphics Center from 1963-1987, Pratt Institute from 1964-1991 and the Pratt Institute Summer Program in Venice, Italy from 1988-2007.

John Ross taught at New School for Social Research from 1957-2008, Manhattanville College from 1966-1986, Cooper Union from 1967-1969, and Columbia University from 1983-1984.

The process of collagraphy is particularly identified with John Ross and Clare Romano. Ross began making collagraphs while teaching printmaking for the U.S.I.A. in Romania in 1964. He was teaching etchings and drypoints when a shortage of zinc plates occurred. In a desperate bid for materials, he started working with cardboard and glue to replace the zinc plates.

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To see more prints in the show, you can view them online here.

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19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: View of Washington

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two prints of Washington, DC. The older print is an engraving by W. J. Bennett. This is one of the great views of the Nation’s Capital.  Washington is shown from the south bank of the Anacostia River.  On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, est. 1799, behind is the original Capitol Building, and to the left is the White House. The painter of this view is George Cooke. He and the engraver, William Bennett, teamed up to produce four folio-size views of American cities.

The later view was drawn by Vernon Howe Bailey, a famous illustrator working in the first part of the 20th century. The piece offers a similar view of Washington, composed of fleeting brushstrokes and delicate line work. It was used as an illustration for an article or story, although we do not know where. In the lower margin reads the inscription “Heading or Tail Piece.”

Image on Left: City of Washington : From beyond the Navy Yard. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Engraved by W. J. Bennett.  Aquatint engraving, 1834.

Image on Right: Washington from across Potomac River. By Vernon Howe Bailey. Pencil and wash drawing, c. 1930.

 

 

 

 

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