Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Monotype, Prints, Screenprint, Woodcut

Outside the Margin Series

Our 2014 Winter Contemporary Show is still on view at The Old Print Gallery. One of the best things about doing the Winter Contemporary Show every year is catching up with all our talented contemporary artists, seeing and learning about their new projects and experiments in printmaking. It is exciting to witness the evolution of their art over time, as they play with scale, new color palettes, subject matter, and technique.
Outside the Margin (3). Susan Goldman. Screenprint monotype with woodcut, 2014. Signed, titled, dated, and editioned on back by artist in pencil. Lily Press stamp in red ink on back. Paper size 10 x 8" (254 x 203 mm).  LINK.

Outside the Margin (3). Susan Goldman. Screenprint monotype with woodcut, 2014. Signed, titled, dated, and editioned on back by artist in pencil. Lily Press stamp in red ink on back. Paper size 10 x 8″ (254 x 203 mm). LINK.

Susan Goldman (no stranger to the OPG blog- read her interview here) is one of our contemporary printmakers from DC. We have represented her work for several years now, and her new series, entitled “Outside the Margin” is an intriguing transition from her previous work. While smaller in size than most of her other prints, you can certainly link the thematic elements to her earlier monotypes. In the past, Susan has worked with the image of an amphora, exploring and celebrating ancient civilizations’ reverence for the object. Homer describes the vessel as the “Prima Materia”, a metaphor for the womb of the earth. Swirling and blossoming, Goldman’s amphorae mirror the female silhouette as it generates and nurtures new life. In her new series, Goldman uses the motif of an amphora, but layers in new pattern work and symbolism-like concentric circles and blossoms.
“This varied edition evolved out of mixing my earlier ideas about pattern inspired by travel to Morocco and my new ideas about simplifying my approach to imagery of flowers, targets and amphorae. The layering of multiple print mediums relates to an archaeology of process, what is below is mysterious and fragmented, but as one uncovers the clues, a new picture emerges that references the past and the present.”- Susan Goldman
Outside the Margin (1). Susan Goldman. Screenprint monotype with woodcut, 2014. Signed, titled, dated, and editioned on back by artist in pencil. Lily Press stamp in red ink on back. Paper size 10 x 8" (254 x 203 mm).  LINK.

Outside the Margin (1). Susan Goldman. Screenprint monotype with woodcut, 2014. Signed, titled, dated, and editioned on back by artist in pencil. Lily Press stamp in red ink on back. Paper size 10 x 8″ (254 x 203 mm). LINK.

Outside the Margin (2). Susan Goldman. Screenprint monotype with woodcut, 2014. Signed, titled, dated, and editioned on back by artist in pencil. Lily Press stamp in red ink on back. Paper size 10 x 8" (254 x 203 mm). LINK.

Outside the Margin (2). Susan Goldman. Screenprint monotype with woodcut, 2014. Signed, titled, dated, and editioned on back by artist in pencil. Lily Press stamp in red ink on back. Paper size 10 x 8″ (254 x 203 mm). LINK.

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Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Gallery Updates, Prints, Woodcut

Thanksgiving Holiday Hours

Turkey. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 1978. Edition 50. Image size 10 5/8 x 10 7/8" (273 x 278 mm). LINK.

Turkey. By Su-Li Hung. Color woodcut, 1978. Edition 50. Image size 10 5/8 x 10 7/8″ (273 x 278 mm). LINK.

Thanksgiving Hours:

  • Tuesday 11/25: Open 10:00 AM to 5:20 PM
  • Wednesday 11/26: Open 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
  • Thursday 11/27: Closed for Thanksgiving
  • Friday 11/28- Saturday 11/29: Open 10:00 AM to 5:20 PM

We wish you all a happy Thanksgiving and safe travels. Above are our Thanksgiving holiday hours- feel free to stop by today, tomorrow, or Friday and Saturday to browse our extensive collection and to see our 2014 Winter Contemporary Show. The gallery is free and all ages are welcome. With prints and maps ranging from the 15th century to the 21st century, we have something for everyone to enjoy (and great gifts for the holidays).

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Abstract, Citiscapes, Color Woodcut, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Figurative, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Prints, White-line Woodcut, Wood, woodblock print, Woodcut

Washington Post Review of “Ink & Grain”

Head of a Traveler. By Adja Yunkers. Color woodcut,  1952.  Image size 13 1/2 x 9 1/2". LINK.

Head of a Traveler. By Adja Yunkers. Color woodcut, 1952. Image size 13 1/2 x 9 1/2″. LINK.

Mark Jenkins, arts writer for The Washington Post, featured our woodcut and wood engraving show, Ink & Grain,  in his most recent column. Follow the link below to read his article, and make sure to stop by the gallery before November 15th to see the show in person.

Mark Jenkin’s Ink & Grain review in The Washington Post, 10/31/14.

(Quick note: Our exhibit  is the last show reviewed, so it does take some scrolling to get to the write up on Ink & Grain).

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19th Century Prints, Botanical, Color Woodcut, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Woodcut

Past/Present: Honeysuckle

past present logo copyToday we are happy to share a new Past/Present post, featuring two stunning honeysuckle prints. The older print is a scarce lithograph, with original hand color, from “Flora’s Dictionary,” by Mrs. E.W. Wirt of Virginia.  With a publication date of 1837, Mrs. Wirt’s book is one of the earliest colored botanical works published in America.  Rather than depicting a single flower, each plate shows a carefully selected grouping.  As Bennett notes, “The arrangements of flowers are beautifully balanced and the coloring is brilliant.”  (Bennett, “American Color Plate Books, 115).

The woodcut is by English woodcut artist Mayel Allington Royds (1874-1941). Royds grew up in Liverpool and turned down a scholarship at age of fifteen to the Royal Academy of London, in order to attend the Slade School of Art and study under the formidable Henry Tonks. After an apprenticeship in Paris working in the studio of Walter Sickert, Royds accepted a teaching post at the Havergal College in Toronto. She later returned to the UK to teach at the Edinburgh College of Art where she met three people integral to her artistic development and life: Samuel Peploe, a Scottish post-impressionist painter highly regarded for his mastery of color, Frank Morley Fletcher, under whose influence she took up Japanese color woodcuts, and her future husband, Scottish etcher E. S. Lumsden.

Together Lumsen and Royds traveled to Tibet and India, their experiences serving as inspiration for her later woodcuts, both in design and in the use of saturated, rich color. The scenes she created of India from 1920 to 1930s are some of her more renowned work. From 1930 to 1933, Royds created a series of flower prints, which utilized her bold color work and Japanese woodblock technique. These stunning compositions, including Honeysuckle, are now part of the permanent collection at the National Gallery of Scotland. Royds was a regular contributor to the Society of Scottish Artists, the Society of Artist Printers, and the Graver Printers in Colour, exhibited her work in Scotland, Manchester, and further abroad.

Hope you enjoy these two prints!

Image on the left: Honeysuckle, Coral Honeysuckle, Wild Honeysuckle, Hop. Plate XXIV.  From “Flora’s Dictionary,” by Mrs. E.W. Wirt of Virginia. Embellished by Mrs. Anna Smith. Published by Fielding Lucas, Jr., Baltimore. Lithograph, original hand color, 1837. Image size (vignette) 7 x 5″ (175 x 130 mm).

Image on the rightHoneysuckle. By Mabel A. Royds. Woodcut printed in color, 1935-38. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 6 /12″ (203 x 165 mm).

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Color Woodcut, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Landscapes, Prints, Wood, woodblock print, Woodcut

“Ink & Grain” to open in September

Autumn Road Santa Fe. By Norma Basset Hall. Color woodblock, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist.

Autumn Road Santa Fe. By Norma Basset Hall. Color woodblock, 1928. Signed in pencil by the artist.

The Old Print Gallery is proud to announce its new fall print show, Ink & Grain, which will open on Friday, September 19, 2014 with a free opening night reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. Ink & Grain is a group show, highlighting 20th century printmakers who excelled in woodcuts and wood engravings. The exhibit will remain on view at the Old Print Gallery until November 15th, 2014.

One of the most ancient forms of printmaking, the woodcut was in huge decline in the 19th century, as printmakers turned to other forms of reproductive mediums. Luckily, the 20th century saw a revived and energized artistic expression for woodcuts and wood engravings. These new woodcut artists experimented heavily with technique, in ways both innovative and nuanced. Printmakers, like Werner Drewes and Barbara Latham, incorporated the grain of the woodblock directly into the composition of their prints- surrendering to its complexities while highlighting its unique, undulating patterns. Others, including Gustave Baumann, Leo Frank, Norma Bassset Hall, and Luigi Rist, experimented with new methods of ink and color application, resulting in stylized prints in a bold, modern palate, as well as softer, luminous color prints inked onto thin Japanese paper.

Sea Shell and Carlic. Luigi Rist. Color woodcut, 1947. Signed in ink on the block. Titled and inscribed "150 Edition" in pencil.

Sea Shell and Garlic. Luigi Rist. Color woodcut, 1947. Signed in ink on the block. Titled and inscribed “150 Edition” in pencil.

Wood engravings also saw a resurgence during the 20th century, especially in the form of artist’s hand-made books and commercial book illustrations. The show includes works by skilled wood engravers Clare Leighton, Lawrence N. Wilbur, and John Murphy, all who made a name for themselves as dynamic illustrators and artists.

Digging Potatoes. By Clare Leighton. Wood engraving, 1935. Signed and titled in pencil. Edition 30.

Digging Potatoes. By Clare Leighton. Wood engraving, 1935. Signed and titled in pencil. Edition 30.

Selected Artists: Gustave Baumann, Asa Cheffetz, Werner Drewes, Leo Frank, Antonio Frasconi, Eliza Draper Gardiner, Norma Bassett Hall, Barbara Latham, Clare Leighton, Alessandro Mastro-Valerio, John J. A. Murphy, Luigi Rist, Mabel Royds, Charles Svendsen, Paul Wenck, Lawrence N. Wilbur, and Adja Yunkers.

 

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