Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints, Watercolor

RED show

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

Fast Forward by Rosemary Cooley. Monotype, 2006.

We are very excited to announce our early spring show, RED, which will open with a nighttime reception on February 15, 2013.  RED is a group show of contemporary and early 20th century printmakers who feature the emboldened and passionate hue of red in their prints. Red is the color of blood, fire, earthen clay and blushing petals, and as such, has strong symbolic connections to life and vitality. The selected artists use this energizing pigment to excite the eye and engage viewers- drawing them into their dynamic compositions.

Highlights include a monotype, Fast Forward, by Washington, DC artist Rosemary Cooley, whose concentrated red tones pulsate beneath more delicate looping white and blue strokes. Similarly, red weaves its way along limbs, eyes, and biomorphic shapes in Cantos y Voces and outlines two faces in Black & White, both by Karima Muyaes. Here, red symbolizes blood-ties and familial relationships, linking disparate visages together into a cohesive whole.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Cantos y Voces. By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Red also is used by artists in representations of our natural world. It shows up in the rust-colored canyons of John Ross’s collagraphs, in the flushed petals of Clare Romano’s Mallorcan Flower and Nina Muys’ Hibiscus, and in the ominous and bruised red and purple sky of Frederick Mershimer’s Eye of the Storm.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

Eye of the Storm. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint and aquatint printed in color and finished by hand, 2006.

The show will be on view until April 13, 2013. We encourage all our blog readers and gallery followers to attend the RED opening reception and show, to see these beautiful and striking prints in person.

Selected Artists: Will Barnet, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Robert Birmelin, Rosemary Cooley, Antonio Frasconi, Susan Goldman, Mary Manusos, Tokoha Matsuda, Heather McMordie, Judy Mensch, Frederick Mershimer, Karima Muyaes, Nina Muys, Michael Pellettieri, Matt Phillips, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Clare Romano, John Ross, and Hank Virgona.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

Four Dark Red Vases. By Susan Goldman. Monotype, 2003.

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Charcoal, Collagraph, Contemporary, Drawing, Gallery Event, Prints

Clare Romano and John Ross: Collagraphs and Drawings of the Southwest

Grand Canyon by Clare Romano. Collagraph, 1975.

The Old Print Shop has a contemporary exhibit on view now, Clare Romano and John Ross: Collagraphs and Drawings of the Southwest. Clare and John met while studying at Cooper Union in the early 1940’s. They were married in 1943, just before John went to Italy during WWII. It is unusual for two married artists to have such highly acclaimed individual careers, but they have managed to make a name for themselves though their writing, printmaking technique, and art.

They wrote, published, and illustrated several books together, the first being Manhattan Island in 1957. One of the most important publications was The Complete Printmaker, published by Macmillan in 1972 and updated and reprinted for decades.

Buttes by John Ross. Collagraph.

Both artists were professors at several colleges and universities over their careers. Clare Romano taught at the Art Center of Northern NJ from 1960-1965, New School University, NYC from 1960-1973, Pratt Graphics Center from 1963-1987, Pratt Institute from 1964-1991 and the Pratt Institute Summer Program in Venice, Italy from 1988-2007.

John Ross taught at New School for Social Research from 1957-2008, Manhattanville College from 1966-1986, Cooper Union from 1967-1969, and Columbia University from 1983-1984.

The process of collagraphy is particularly identified with John Ross and Clare Romano. Ross began making collagraphs while teaching printmaking for the U.S.I.A. in Romania in 1964. He was teaching etchings and drypoints when a shortage of zinc plates occurred. In a desperate bid for materials, he started working with cardboard and glue to replace the zinc plates.

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To see more prints in the show, you can view them online here.

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17th Century Prints, Collagraph, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Gallery Event, Lithograph, Prints, Serigraph, Silver Gelatin Print, White-line Woodcut, Woodcut

Online Summer Shows at the Old Print Shop- Pt. 3

Our NYC sister shop, the Old Print Shop, has three fantastic summer shows going on right now. You can view all three summer shows  online, through their exhibition tab on their website.  Below is a preview of one of their shows, Summer in the Country.

Country Scene. By Peter Hurd. Color lithograph, undated.

Summer in the Country

The country: a place of great escape, where one can leave behind the hustle and bustle of their ordinary lives and enwrap themselves in the beauty that is nature. It is a place of endless entertainment, where natural wonders await discovery and hobbies, new and old, can be enjoyed by people of all ages. From mountain tops to canyon bottom, from horseback riding to sailing and fishing, there are any number of possibilities. One simply needs to find them.

Augustus. By Antonio Tempeste. Engraving, c.1600.

Fence and Shadow. (Newport, RI). By Bo Kass. Silver gelatin print, 2002.

Beach Study. By Richard Carleton. Etching, 2007-8.

Landscape, Cape Cod. By Agnes Weinrich. White-line woodcut, c.1920.

Summer. By Will Barnet. Color lithograph and serigraph. 1986.

The Beach at Dorset. By Ellen Nathan Singer. Etching, 2001.

Red Canyon. By Clare Romano. Collagraph, 1983.

To view Summer in the Country online,  click here. We blogged about The Art of Sporting exhibit last Friday, which can be viewed here, and the exhibit City Heat on Saturday, which can be viewed here.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Lithograph, Oil Painting, Serigraph, Silver Gelatin Print, Watercolor, Woodcut

Online Summer Shows at the Old Print Shop- Pt. 2

Our NYC sister shop, the Old Print Shop, has three fantastic summer shows going on right now. We encourage all New York City residents to stop by their shop and view these impressive shows. For those living outside the 10016 zip code, you can view all three summer shows  online, through their exhibition tab on their website.  Below is a preview of one of their shows, City Heat.

Sunset Whispers. By Richard Sloat. Watercolor, 2005-6.

City Heat:

New York City is a fascinating place to be, especially in the summer. The bitter cold of winter has passed, the plant life has returned and the concrete jungle is transformed once more into the hot, sticky, tourist-filled place it’s known to be. Sites are seen, rides are ridden and gridlock fills the air with noise. Explore New York like you never have before – through the eyes of its artists.

Welcome to the City Heat exhibition. Welcome to New York in the summer.

Bowery. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 1997.

Summer Night. By Harry Brodsky. Lithograph, c.1950.

City Children, The Drum. By Rae Russel. Vintage silver gelatin print, 1950.

Metropolis. By Richard Florsheim. Serigraph, 1979.

Central Park Summer. By Clare Romano. Color woodcut, 1957.

The Heart of Coney Island. By Alan Petrulis. Etching, 2005.

Metro. By Michael DiCerbo. Acrylic and watercolor on canvas, 1999.

To view City Heat online, click here. We blogged about The Art of Sporting exhibit yesterday, and it can be viewed here. Make sure to tune in later in the week for information about their third summer exhibit!

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Contemporary, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Prints

July Show Water at The Old Print Gallery

Gale, Old Wheeler’s Island. By Richard Carleton. Etching, 2001.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to present Water, a group show featuring prints by local, national, and international contemporary artists. Water will open on Friday, July 20, 2012, with a nighttime reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. The show will be on view until September 14, 2012. With a subject matter as open and expansive as water, the show yields both personal and universal interpretations for artist and viewer.

Splash. By Philip Bennet, oil-based monotype,2004.

Abstraction and illusion are prominent in the works of Water. Judy Mensch’s woodblock Water 1 is a product of seven woodblocks, ten passes, and eight colors. The result is a dynamic distillation of water in stripes of deep blues and greens. Philip Bennet’s Splash, too, is an abstract blend of colors, forgoing form to capture a more visceral depiction of a plunge into watery depths. NY artist Peter Milton incorporates overlays of watery motifs in his large, dreamlike images. Here, water alludes to the shadowy depths of the subconscious, and hints at memories and influences from the artist’s past.

Waterfall. By Peter Milton. Digital print, 2010.

Some Fragments VIII-C. By Takamune Ishiguro. Etching and aquatint, 2005.

Marked is the artists’ ability to evoke watery imagery from the hard matrices of copper plates and woodblocks. Simple cuts and gouges transform into brilliantly dappled light on water’s surface in Karen Whitman’s Adrift. Likewise, rough, turmoil waves emerge from the constant rocking and reworking of the plate in Art Werger’s Requiem. Other artists highlight the liquid properties of inked media itself to communicate a watery essence. Takume Ishiguro’s use of aquatint and water-based inks in Some Fragments VII-C adds fluidity and glassiness to his macro depiction of water bubbles. Whether water is depicted in large scale or small scale, figuratively or metaphorically, its capacity to mesmerize and captivate artists’ attention is undeniable.

Selected Artists: William J. Behnken, Philip Bennet, Richard Carleton, Antonio Frasconi, Takamune Ishiguro, Stanley Kaplan, Alessandro Mastro-Valerio, Judy Mensch, Frederick Mershimer, Peter Milton, Clare Romano, Ilse Schreiber Noll, Herbert Simon, Mary Teichman, Art Werger, and Karen Whitman.

For more information, please visit our Events page on our website, or check out the images selected for the show on our Current Show page. We hope to see you all there at the opening!

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