19th Century Prints, Americana, Engraving, Lithograph, Prints, Wood

First Battle of Bull Run

154 Years Ago Today…..

The First Battle of Bull Run was fought on July 21, 1861, near the city of Manassas, Virginia not far from Washington, D.C. It was the first major battle of the American Civil War. The Union forces, led by McDowell, were slow in positioning themselves, allowing Confederate reinforcements time to arrive by rail. Each side had about 18,000 poorly trained and poorly led troops in their first battle. It was a Confederate victory which ended with a disorganized and hasty retreat of the Union forces. Below are several prints we have of the widely documented (and illustrated) first battle.

The Battle of Bull Run, 2 P.M. July 21, 1861.  Alfred Waud. Published by Harper's Weekly, August 10, 1861. Wood engraving, 1861. Image size 13 3/4 x 20 1/4" (35 x 51.4 cm). LINK.

The Battle of Bull Run, 2 P.M. July 21, 1861. Alfred Waud. Published by Harper’s Weekly, August 10, 1861. Wood engraving, 1861. Image size 13 3/4 x 20 1/4″ (35 x 51.4 cm). LINK.

Col. Michael Corcoran, at the Battle of Bull Run, Va. - July 21st 1861. : The desperate and bloody charge of the "Gallant Sixty-Ninth," on the Rebel Batteries.  Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, undated. Small folio - image size 8 x 12 1/4 inches. LINK.

Col. Michael Corcoran, at the Battle of Bull Run, Va. – July 21st 1861. : The desperate and bloody charge of the “Gallant Sixty-Ninth,” on the Rebel Batteries. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, undated. Small folio – image size 8 x 12 1/4 inches. LINK.

The Great Battle at Bull Run, VA., on Sunday Afternoon, July 21, Retreat of the Federal Army upon Centreville – Col. Miles’s Reserve Division Covering the Retreat and Repelling the Charge of the Rebel Cavalry – Panic Among the Teamsters and Civilians, and General Stampede Towards Arlington Heights. Published by  Frank Leslie, New York. Wood engraving, c. 1862.  From "Pictorial History of the War of 1861." Image size 19 7/8 x 29 1/4". LINK.

The Great Battle at Bull Run, VA., on Sunday Afternoon, July 21, Retreat of the Federal Army upon Centreville – Col. Miles’s Reserve Division Covering the Retreat and Repelling the Charge of the Rebel Cavalry – Panic Among the Teamsters and Civilians, and General Stampede Towards Arlington Heights. Published by Frank Leslie, New York. Wood engraving, c. 1862. From “Pictorial History of the War of 1861.” Image size 19 7/8 x 29 1/4″. LINK.

 

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Lithograph, Maps, Pocket Maps

Rare Confederate imprint of “Map of the Seat of War”

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8" (521 x 650 mm) plus margins. LINK.

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8″ (521 x 650 mm) plus margins.  LINK.

The map we are sharing in today’s blog post is an extremely rare Confederate imprint, Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia by Evans & Cogswell.  Printed in 1861, this unusual pocket map shows the coastal area from Georgetown, South Carolina, to Savannah, Georgia, and territory inland as far north as Kingstree, South Carolina, and west to Barnwell, South Carolina. The map notes the location of forts, rivers, roads, railroads, ferries, bridges, dwellings with names of inhabitants, churches, and post offices. In the lower right is an inset map titled “Portion of Georgia” which shows Savannah and the nearby areas to the south and east. Drawn on a scale of one inch to five miles, this map was originally issued as a folding pocket map, although this particular example lacks the original covers.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A detailed look at  the inset map,  “Portion of Georgia.”

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A detailed look at the inset map, “Portion of Georgia.”

Very few examples of this map are known to exist. During the Civil War, map publishers in the South were limited by access to paper, presses, and experienced lithographers and engravers. Those who did publish from the Confederate states did so in smaller edition sizes and with much less frequency.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A close-up view of the publisher's imprint.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A close-up view of the publisher’s imprint.

This map, a lithograph, was printed by Evans & Cogswell, a company based at 3 Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina. The firm of Walker, Evans & Cogswell was founded in Charleston in 1821. They were printers as well as stationers. In 1860, Walker died and the business continued as Evans & Cogswell. While the firm printed a handful of maps during their existence, they are best remembered for printing the Ordinance of Secession. They also printed small denomination currency, Government bonds, the Soldier’s Prayer Book, books on war tactics, stamps, and medical books for the Confederacy. Later in the war, the firm moved to Columbia hoping for protection from the war. Soon after their move, the business was burned during Gen. Sherman’s infamous March to the Sea. We urge all map enthusiasts to stop by our gallery to see this map in person. This imprint would make an impressive addition to any Civil War map collection.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Lithograph, Maps

War Telegram Marking Map

War Telegram Marking Map. Published by L. Prang & Co. Boston. Lithograph, 1862. Image size 33 3/8 x 22 3/8" (850 x 567 mm) plus margins. Good condition save for repared splitting along fold lines. Backed with japan paper. LINK.

War Telegram Marking Map. Published by L. Prang & Co. Boston. Lithograph, 1862. Image size 33 3/8 x 22 3/8″ (850 x 567 mm) plus margins. Good condition save for repared splitting along fold lines. Backed with japan paper.

This large scale Civil War map depicts the area between Richmond and Baltimore in good detail. In the “Explanations” below the map, map publisher L. Prang states that “The extraordinary large scale on which this map is drawn has been adopted to make it just what we designed it to be, namely 1st The most distinct map ever published of the whole Virginia Territory; where the decisive battles for the Union will be fought, 2nd A Marking Map, that is a map to mark the change of positions of the Union Forces in Red Pencil and the Rebel Forces in Blue, on the receipt of Every Telegram from the seat of war…” He goes on to say that he will furnish the necessary colored pencils and that “with the aid of a little soft bread”, prior markings can be erased to show the latest developments.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing "Explanation" written by publisher L. Prang.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing “Explanation” written by publisher L. Prang.

Printed in brown-black ink, this is a fascinating historical map. Our impression has colored pencil markings, to depict troop movements of both the Union and Confederate troops, around Washington, Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Yorktown.

The telegraph was invented in 1844 by Samuel F. B. Morse and revolutionized communications. He utilized one wire to carry the entire alphabet rather than a wire for each letter. By the time the Civil War erupted, President Abraham Lincoln encouraged the use of the telegram and had a telegraph office set up in the war room. Traveling telegraph wagons followed troops into the field.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Richmond, Va.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Richmond, Va. Blue pencil markings signified Confederate forces.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements of Union and Confederate forces near Washington, DC and Alexandria, VA.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements of Union and Confederate forces near Washington, DC and Alexandria, VA. Red pencil markings denote Union troops, blue pencil markings denote Confederate troops.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Yorktown, VA.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Yorktown, Hampton, and Ft. Norfolk.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Fredericksburg.

Detail of War Telegram Marking Map. Showing troop movements near Fredericksburg, VA.

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Gallery Updates, Maps, Stone, Woodcut

Mapping America

The Old Print Gallery is celebrating maps in 2014, with a mini exhibit of antique American maps displayed on our gallery walls. We selected eight maps from our collection, starting with the influential Munster 1588 map Americae sive Noi Orbis Nova Descriptio, and ending with Mitchell’s 1861 Military Map of the United States. Gallery friends are invited to stop by and see “snapshots” of our great country over time, through wars and conflict as well as periods of prodigious exploration and expansion, as told by maps.

Americae sive Novi Orbis, Nova Descriptio. Sebastain Munster.  Published by Sebastain Petri, Basel. Woodcut, 1588. 1628 edition. Image size 12 1/8 x 14 1/8" (306 x 360 mm) plus margins. Very good condition; black and white. Framed in acid-free zinc mat with gold line, in gold frame and UV glass. Framed map $3,100.

Americae sive Novi Orbis, Nova Descriptio. Sebastain Munster. Published by Sebastain Petri, Basel. Woodcut, 1588. 1628 edition. Image size 12 1/8 x 14 1/8″ (306 x 360 mm) plus margins. Very good condition; black and white. Framed in acid-free zinc mat with gold line, in gold frame and UV glass. Framed map $3,100.00. Click on map for better detail.

This influential woodcut map from Munster’s Cosmographia replaced the earlier and highly speculative Munster map of 1540. Cartographically based on Ortelius’ 1570 map, this map features a typical Ortelian treatment of the western coastline of North America. Place names like Quieriva, Anian, and Tolm are artfully engraved in the Northern continent, along with river ways and mountain ranges, including the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The map shows an oversized southwestern coastline of South America, sometimes referred to as the “Chilean bulge”. A massive southern continent, Meridies Tierra del Fuego, sits at the bottom of the map.

This map was issued unchanged from 1588 through 1628. A secondary title in German appears above the map, “Die newen Inseln so hinder Hispania Gegen Orient bey dem Landt Indie Gelegen”.

America. Jodocus Hondius. Published by J. Hondius, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, c.1606. French issue, 1630. . Image size 14 3/4 x 19 3/4" (373 x 500mm). Good condition save repair near lower centerfold. Black and white. Framed in acid-free tumbleweed mat with cream top mat, in a wooden frame with panel and UV Plexiglas.  Framed $7850.00

America. Jodocus Hondius. Published by J. Hondius, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, c.1606. French issue, 1630. . Image size 14 3/4 x 19 3/4″ (373 x 500mm). Good condition save repair near lower centerfold. Black and white. Framed in acid-free tumbleweed mat with cream top mat, in a wooden frame with panel and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $7,850.00. Click on map for better detail. 

Hondius engraved this map for his first edition of Gerard Mercator’s atlas.  It was issued in his atlases until 1630.  The enlarged North American continent includes many errors, notably the northeast portion in the current U.S., which is badly distorted, and an oddly protruding Virginia coastline. It does have a more accurate depiction of the southwest coast of South America.

Various scenes which were taken from the earlier volumes of de Bry’s Grand Voyages adorn this map.  The inset in the lower left margin is an intriguing Brazilian native scene, illustrating the method used to make a local beverage.

America with those known parts in that unknown worlde both people and manner of buildings Discribed and inlarged by I.S. Ano. 1626. John Speed. Published by Thomas Bassett and Richard Chiswell, London. Copper plate engraving, 1626 (1676.)  Image size 15 1/8 x 20" (385 x 506 mm) plus narrow margins. Good condition save for tear in lower portion of image just left of the centerfold. Early twentieth century hand coloring. Framed map $7,975.00.

America with those known parts in that unknown worlde both people and manner of buildings Discribed and inlarged by I.S. Ano. 1626. John Speed. Published by Thomas Bassett and Richard Chiswell, London. Copper plate engraving, 1626 (1676.)  On the verso is a two-page English text “The Description of America”. Fourth state of four. Image size 15 1/8 x 20″ (385 x 506 mm) plus narrow margins. Good condition save for tear in lower portion of image just left of the centerfold. Early twentieth century hand coloring. Framed map $7,975.00. Click on map for better detail.

This is a quite decorative and highly desirable map of the Americas. It appeared in Speed’s atlas Prospect of the Most Formed Parts of the World, the first English world atlas, although the copperplates were engraved by Abraham Goos in Amsterdam, the center of the European map trade.

This was the first map published in an atlas that depicted California not as a peninsula, but as an island, a cartographic misconception that endured for nearly 100 years. The map has a fairly accurate rending of the East Coast, especially between Chesapeake Bay and Cape Cod.  Many English colonies appear on the map, including Plymouth in the northeast and Iames Citti in Virginia. The northwest coastline is very faint.

Surrounding this map on two sides are images of indigenous peoples found from Greenland to the Straits of Magellan. The figures on the left represent natives from the north, while figures on the right side are southern natives. Eight town views appear on top. Although the map depicts the English presence in North America, surprisingly none of the town views are English colonies. Rather, they show important early views of Havana, St. Domingo, and Rio, among others. An inset map shows Greenland, Baffin’s Bay and Iceland.

Accurata delineatio celeberrimae Regionis Ludovicianae vel Galliee Louisiane ol Canadae et Floridae adpellatione in Septemtrionali America . . . Mississippi vel St. Louis. Matthew Seutter. Published by Matthew Seutter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving with original hand color, c.1730. Image size 19 3/8 x 22 1/2" (494 x 571 mm). Good condition, save several faint foxing marks in right margin and brown stain in lower right of image. Framed in an acid-free dark grey bottom mat, antique tan top mat, rounded gold frame with red rub, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $3,355.00

Accurata delineatio celeberrimae Regionis Ludovicianae vel Galliee Louisiane ol Canadae et Floridae adpellatione in Septemtrionali America . . . Mississippi vel St. Louis. Matthew Seutter. Published by Matthew Seutter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving with original hand color, c.1730. Image size 19 3/8 x 22 1/2″ (494 x 571 mm). Good condition, save several faint foxing marks in right margin and brown stain in lower right of image. Framed in an acid-free dark grey bottom mat, antique tan top mat, rounded gold frame with red rub, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $3,355.00. Click on map for better detail.

This map shows North America as known in the early 18th century, with the English colonies along the Atlantic seaboard, a large Louisiana to the south, and Canada with New France taking up the northern tier. At upper left is a large inset of the Gulf coast from the Mississippi delta to Cap St. Blaise. The map prominently features the Mississippi River and Great Lakes.

This map has an elaborately engraved title cartouche, which depicts an allegorical scene of the Mississippi Bubble, a rather poor investment scheme by John Law to develop French Louisiana. The cherubs floating above the cartouche are shown issuing stock for Law’s trading company, while a female personification of the Mississippi River pours out riches and gold to frenzied buyers on her left. To her right, forlorn investors mourn their losses and stab themselves, while cherubs below blow bubbles, surrounded by worthless stocks.

A New Map of North America. Copper plate engraving, undated, c.1760. Image size 16 7/8 x 21 1/2" (429 x 546 mm) plus margins. Good condition, save for splitting along fold lines. Professionally conserved. Black & white. Framed with acid-free zinc mat, gold spandrel, zinc top mat, light gold beaded frame with gold panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $2,230.

A New Map of North America. Copper plate engraving, undated, c.1760. Image size 16 7/8 x 21 1/2″ (429 x 546 mm) plus margins. Good condition, save for splitting along fold lines. Professionally conserved. Black & white. Framed with acid-free zinc mat, gold spandrel, zinc top mat, light gold beaded frame with gold panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $2,230.00. Click on map for better detail.

This is an unusual folio-sized map of the English colonies, shown approximately at the close of the French and Indian War. No cartographer or publisher’s name is given. This scarce and highly detailed map later appeared as a folded insert in History of the War in America printed in 1779 Dublin, and the next year in An Impartial History of the War in America. It was engraved based on John Mitchell’s map of 1755.

The map, meant to acquaint the general reader with the North American theater of the Seven Years War, identifies Indian tribes and forts built by the French.

A Correct Map of the United States of North America Including the British and Spanish Territories carefully laid down agreeable to the Treaty of 1784. Thomas Bowen. Published London. Copper plate engraving, 1787-90. Image size 12 3/8 x 17 5/8" (314 x 447 mm). Good condition, save small marginal repairs.  Framed with acid-free black mat, antique top mat, brushed gold frame, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,220.00

A Correct Map of the United States of North America Including the British and Spanish Territories carefully laid down agreeable to the Treaty of 1784. Thomas Bowen. Published London. Copper plate engraving, 1787-90. Image size 12 3/8 x 17 5/8″ (314 x 447 mm). Good condition, save small marginal repairs. Framed with acid-free black mat, antique top mat, brushed gold frame, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,220.00. Click on map for better detail.

An early map of the United States, printed soon after the conclusion of the American Revolution. It was published in A New Royal Authentic and Complete System of Universal Geography by Rev. Thomas Bankes. The map shows the first 13 states; it was published prior to admission of Vermont, Kentucky or Tennessee. The map includes a great deal of information on the Great Lakes and Mississippi valley areas. It is also filled with extensive notations on everything from locations and characteristics of Native American tribes (ex: “Tintons- a Wandering Nation”) to land conditions (ex: “Extensive Meadows Full of Buffalos” and “Country Full of Mines”). East and West Florida are shown, as are a large Louisiana and New Mexico.

Charte uber die vereinigten Staaten von Nord-America. Christoph Fembo. Copper plate engraving, 1818.  Image size 17 5/8 x 22 3/4" (447 x 575 mm) plus margins. Good condition. Original outline hand coloring. Framed with acid-free bluff mat, fieldstone blue top mat, beaded light gold frame with panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,260.00.

Charte uber die vereinigten Staaten von Nord-America. Christoph Fembo. Copper plate engraving, 1818. Image size 17 5/8 x 22 3/4″ (447 x 575 mm) plus margins. Good condition. Original outline hand coloring. Framed with acid-free bluff mat, fieldstone blue top mat, beaded light gold frame with panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,260.00. Click on map for better detail.

This unusual map was first issued by Gussefeld / Homann Heirs of Nuremburg in 1784, showing the newly formed United States under the title “Charte über die XIII verinigte Staaten von Nord-America.” The plate was subsequently updated and reissued in 1818 to reflect additional states. Many of the new states are strangely shaped. Virginia is engraved with an almost straight north to south western border, and Kentucky and Ohio are wedge shaped. Indiana and Illinois are placed approximately 100 miles to the west of where they should be. Illinois does not touch Lake Michigan. Mississippi is shown as a territory, despite gaining statehood in December of 1817.  A very scarce map.

Mitchell's Military Map of the United States, showing forts, &c. With separate maps of states, vicinities of cities &c.  S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by S.A. Mitchell Jr., Philadelphia. Stone engraving, 1861. Image size 22 3/4 x 25 1/4" (64.1 x 57.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition, save for several short tears along sheet edges and fold lines. Small stain in upper title. Backed on rice paper.  Framed with acid-free black bottom mat, antique tan top mat, gold frame with aged patina, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,950.00

Mitchell’s Military Map of the United States, showing forts, &c. With separate maps of states, vicinities of cities &c. S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by S.A. Mitchell Jr., Philadelphia. Stone engraving, 1861. Image size 22 3/4 x 25 1/4″ (64.1 x 57.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition, save for several short tears along sheet edges and fold lines. Small stain in upper title. Backed on rice paper. Framed with acid-free black bottom mat, antique tan top mat, gold frame with aged patina, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,950.00. Click on map for better detail. 

A scarce separately issued broadside map produced at the beginning of the American Civil War. This map shows the new territories that were made after southern states seceded. As the trans-Mississippi region developed during the 1850s, there was a call to break up the very large territories into smaller ones. However, every newly created territory had an impact on the power struggle in Congress over the issue of slavery, so between 1854, with its Kansas-Nebraska Act, and 1860, no new territories were created.  After secession, the northerners in Congress were able to act quickly and create three new territories:  a large Dakota Territory, Territory of Nevada, and Colorado Territory- all present on this map.

Another feature of this map is the depiction of a never-existing horizontal border between the free territory of New Mexico and slave territory of Arizona. On August 1 1861, the Confederacy established Arizona Territory, consisting of the southern half of the Union’s New Mexico Territory; the Union still claimed the whole territory. The region was sometimes called Arizona before 1863, despite the fact it was still part of the Territory of New Mexico until 1912.

Two large inset maps show County map of Virginia, and North Carolina and County map of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. Smaller inset maps show Hampton Roads, Washington, D.C., Pensacola Bay, Charleston Harbor, New Orleans, Louisiana, Baltimore and Richmond.

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Stone

New Additions: US Maps

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe have three new maps if the United States in our inventory- all rare and unique representations of our country. These 19th century maps highlight pivotal moments in our history and development as a nation- our coast-to-coast expansion, creation of new western territories, and our country at the beginning of a long civil war. The maps are already up on our website, and can be viewed in our Georgetown gallery as well, if you want a closer look. Enjoy!

666681. United States of America, corrected & improved from the best authorities. Benjamin Warner. Published by B. Warner, Philadelphia. Engraving, 1820. 16 1/2 x 25 1/4″ (420 x 644 mm) plus hairline margins. Good condition and color. Backed on rice paper. Removed from original covers. Phillips, Maps, p. 881; Wheat 341. View on website.

One of the earliest separately published maps to show the United States from coast to coast. Wheat remarks that this is one of a series of maps issued between 1818 and 1820 which galvanized the mythological rivers of the west. It also shows a Michigan Territory, a double wide Arkansas Territory, and a Northwest Territory (Minnesota and Wisconsin).

89782. Central America II, including Texas, California and the Northern States of Mexico. Published under the superintendence of the S.D.U.K. by Chapman & Hall, London. Engraving with hand-colored outlines, 1842. Engraved by J. & C. Walker. Image size 12 5/16 x 15 1/2″ (313 x 394 mm). Good condition. Original outline color. View on website.

This SDUK published map of the American southwest shows the northern parts of Mexico, ‘Nueva California,’ and the independent republic of Texas. California was to remain under Mexican control until conquered by U. S. forces in the Mexican War (1846-47).  It is a highly detailed map, with many references to historic locales. The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, better known as SDUK, was an English enterprise devoted to spreading the most up to date cartographic information and enhancing geographical understanding and knowledge of the world.

796743. Mitchell’s Military Map of the United States, showing forts, &c. With separate maps of states, vicinities of cities &c. S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by S.A. Mitchell Jr. 31 S. 6th St., Philadelphia. Stone engraving, 1861. Image size 22 3/4 x 25 1/4″ (64.1 x 57.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition save for several short tears along sheet edges and fold lines. Small stain in upper title. Backed on rice paper. View on website.

This is a scarce, separately issued broadside map produced at the beginning of the American Civil War. The map shows the new territories that were made after southern states succeeded. As the trans-Mississippi region grew and developed during the 1850s, there was a call for the breaking up the very large territories from the beginning of the decade into smaller ones. However, every newly created territory had an impact on the power struggle in Congress over the issue of slavery, so between 1854, with its Kansas-Nebraska Act, and 1860, no new territories were created.  After succession, the northerners in Congress were able to act quickly and create three new territories:  a large Dakota Territory, Territory of Utah, and Colorado Territory- all shown here. Another feature of this map is the depiction of the never-existing horizontal border between the free territory of Arizona and slave territory of New Mexico. Two large inset maps show a county map of Virginia and North Carolina and a county map of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. Smaller inset maps show Hampton Roads, Washington, D.C., Pensacola Bay, Charleston Harbor, New Orleans, Louisiana, Baltimore and Richmond.

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