19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Roto-engraving

New Additions: Cram’s 1898 City Plans

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added twenty-four city plans from a 1898 version of “Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” to our map inventory. George F. Cram Co. was a leading 19th and 20th century map firm, based out of Chicago and later Indianapolis. It was the first American firm to publish a world atlas, and brought globes, classroom maps, and educational atlases into the schools and homes of many. His “Unrivaled Atlas of the World” was so popular it was printed continuously from the 1880’s to 1952.

These maps shown today were printed using color rotogravure, an intaglio technique adopted in the late 19th century. For those looking to collect a map of their city or a favorite travel destination, these Cram maps are handsome and finely detailed. Many offer a key to prominent buildings, churches, attractions, and railroad depots within the city. They are attractively colored in blues, yellows, and pinks, and well sized at ~10 x 13 inches. We hope you enjoy these maps!

“Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” Maps Available at The Old Print Gallery:

  1. Baltimore.
  2. Buffalo.
  3. Brooklyn.
  4. Boston.
  5. Yellowstone National Park.
  6. Map of Parkersburg West Virginia, and Vicinity. 
  7. Richmond and Manchester, Virginia.
  8. Map of Cincinnati.
  9. Cleveland.
  10. Detroit.
  11. Map of the City of Saginaw, Michigan.
  12. Map of Chicago.
  13. St. Louis.
  14. Council Bluffs.
  15. Map of St. Paul.
  16. Omaha.
  17. Denver.
  18. Louisville.
  19. Nashville.
  20. Atlanta.
  21. New Orleans.
  22. Map of the City of Quebec.
  23. Dallas.
  24. City of Montreal.
Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2". LINK.

Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2″.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8", plus text and margins.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8″, plus text and margins.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12". LINK.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12″.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8  x 10". LINK.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8 x 10″.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2". LINK.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2″.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13  x 10 1/8". LINK.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 x 10 1/8″.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

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17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, 20th Century Maps, American Maps, Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Foreign Maps, Foreign Views, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Maps, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Pocket Maps, Prints, Sporting, World Maps

May 2015 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new May 2015 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog presents a wide range of prints and maps, at all price points. Highlights include Fritz Baedeker travel maps of popular cities and destinations, baseball scenes, college views, circus prints, Frederick Catherwood lithographs of ancient Mayan temples, and more! We have also feature several selections from our most recent aquatint show, Tonal Array, and our current landscape exhibit, Resonant Terrain.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in September. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the May Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.  Volume XXXVIII, Number 2.  May 2015. Click Here To Read!

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.
Volume XXXVIII, Number 2. May 2015.
Click Here To Read!

We hope you enjoy it!

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19th Century Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Uncategorized

New Additions: SDUK maps

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added a handful of SDUK-published maps to our Foreign Maps section of our website. The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, better known as SDUK, was an English enterprise devoted to spreading the most up-to-date cartographic information and enhancing geographical understanding and knowledge of the world. Founded in 1826, the SDUK was a Whiggish London organization, established at the insistence of Lord Brougham, a strong proponent of education reform. Along with maps, the society published reasonably priced texts that adapted scientific and equally didactic material for the rapidly expanding reading public. Its target audience was composed of people without access to formal teaching, or who preferred self-education.

Over a period of years, the maps that the SDUK produced were issued by various publishers. The following is a breakdown:

  • 1829-32: Baldwin & Craddock
  • 1844: Chapman & Hall
  • 1844-52: C. Knight
  • 1852-53:  G. Cox
  • 1857-70: Stanford

The maps from this series are known for their fine engraving and attention to detail, and include many city maps. Many times, panoramas of the featured cities adorn the lower and upper edges of the map, along with a key to notable buildings or parks.

Munich (Munchen). Published by Edward Stanford for the SDUK, London. Engraving, hand colored, 1832.

Munich (Munchen). Published by Edward Stanford for the SDUK, London. Engraving, hand colored, 1832.

Turin (Torino). Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1833.

Turin (Torino). Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1833.

Athens. Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1832.

Athens. Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1832.

Amsterdam. Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1835.

Amsterdam. Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1835.

Liverpool. Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1836.

Liverpool. Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1836.

Vienna (Wien). Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK. Engraving. hand colored, 1833.

Vienna (Wien). Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK. Engraving. hand colored, 1833.

Lisbon (Lisboa). Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1833.

Lisbon (Lisboa). Published by Baldwin & Craddock for the SDUK, London. Engraving. hand colored, 1833.

Calcutta. Published by Baldwin & Craddock under the superintendence of the SDUK. Handcolored engraving, 1834.

Calcutta. Published by Baldwin & Craddock under the superintendence of the SDUK. Handcolored engraving, 1834.

To see more SDUK maps, visit our website here. 

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps

Foreign City Plans

Today we are sharing some of our town and city plan maps. These more localized maps are fantastic because they allow viewers to see the development and organization of a city. Information on local customs, the local economy, and even  appearance of buildings can be gained by looking at these large-scale plans.

The majority of city plans are scaled representations of the area, as viewed from directly above. An extension of early surveying techniques for estate plans and engineering plans, city plans offer a more precise awareness of an area, providing to be very beneficial.  Alternatively, some city plans feature an oblique, or bird’s eye, view.  This combination of panoramas and traditional city plans allow both cartographic and pictorial detail to be shown, and are very collectible.

Many city plans were specifically designed as such, however there are some plans, like the famous city plans of English, Welsh, and Irish countries by John Speed, which were incorporated as insets on more general maps. Despite their secondary importance in the atlas, some of these plans were the first cartographic depictions of the cities, and are thus historically important.

Below are a sampling of foreign city plans currently in our inventory. Enjoy!

Pianta Della Citta di Roma, con la Indicazione di tutte le Antichita e Nuovi Abbellimenti. An engraving by Pietro Ruga, published by Venanzio Monaldini in 1823. A beautifully engraved large-scale map of Rome. Along the sides are 16 vignette views of important locations and buildings within the city. Some are of Roman ruins, including the Pantheon of Agrippa, Trajan's Column, Pyramid of Cestio and the Coliseum. In the lower right is a key to the 14 neighborhoods of the city.

Broad Street Ward Divided into Parishes according to a New Survey. A copper engraving by B.Cole. Published by T.Osborne and J Shipton, in London, 1756. The London ward map is decorated with building vignettes and decorative cartouches. From William Maitland's "The History of London from Its Foundation to the Present Time."

Le Plan de Paris. A copper engraving by Matthew Seutter, published by Tobias Conrad Lotter, c.1760. A superb and detailed plan of Paris, with streets, gardens, neighborhoods and landmarks depicted and named. The Palais de Tuileries, Louvre and Notre Dame Cathedral all appear. The Left Bank is in the foreground, below the Seine River. At lower left is a key to major churches, palaces and other sites.

Oxfordshire described with ye Citie and the Armes of the Colledges of ye famous University Ao. 1605. A copper-plate engraving by John Speed, engraved by Jodocus Hondius, and published by John Sudbury and George Humbell in London, 1611. One of the most desirable of all Speed county maps, this map is enhanced with a town plan of Oxford drawn from the 1578 plan by Ralph Agas, coats-of-arms for the various university colleges down the sides, the British coat-of-arms, and two robed dons flanking a globe at bottom.

Ierusalem, cum Suburbiis, Prout Tempore Christi Florint. Copper engraving by Matthew Seutter. Published by Tobias Conrad Lotter in 1756. This is an imaginary aerial (bird's eye) plan of ancient Jerusalem at the time of Jesus Christ. It is based upon the 1584 plan by Christian van Adrichom. Below is an extensive 254-item identification key and explanatory text in German.

Plan de Jedo. Copper engraving by Jacques Nicolas Bellin, 1765. This is a detailed city plan of Tokyo, Japan. Bellin was the famed French hydrographer commissioned by the King of France to chart the known coasts and ports of the world for the French Navy.

Hagae Comitis Celeberrimi Totius EUROPAE Municipy Typus. A copperplate engraving by Braun and Hogenburg, c.1580. A beautiful view of The Hague, the international capital of the Netherlands. With an 18-item key to major sites at right. This view appeared in Braun & Hogenberg's "Civitatus Orbis Theatrum," considered the most famous atlas of city views published in the 16th century.

Berlin. A plan of Berlin, Germany, drawn and engraved by J. Dower. Published by William Orr, London, 1836. Details include a 31-item reference key and a view from the suburbs.

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