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May 2015 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new May 2015 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog presents a wide range of prints and maps, at all price points. Highlights include Fritz Baedeker travel maps of popular cities and destinations, baseball scenes, college views, circus prints, Frederick Catherwood lithographs of ancient Mayan temples, and more! We have also feature several selections from our most recent aquatint show, Tonal Array, and our current landscape exhibit, Resonant Terrain.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in September. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the May Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.  Volume XXXVIII, Number 2.  May 2015. Click Here To Read!

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.
Volume XXXVIII, Number 2. May 2015.
Click Here To Read!

We hope you enjoy it!

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Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Woodcut

Past/Present: Circus

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two prints from our upcoming summer show, PER∙FORM. The older print is by Arnold Ronnebeck (1885-1947), a noted modernist sculptor and lithographer. Ronnenbeck studied sculpture with Aristide Maillol and Émile-Antoine Bourdelle in Paris between 1907 and 1913. In 1923, he made the move to the United States, and was best known for his lithographs of New York City in the 1920s and depictions of western life in Colorado and New Mexico in the 1920s through the 1940s. He later settled in Denver, Colorado, and worked as Art Adviser to the Denver Art Museum from 1926-1931. His print shown below, We Shall Always Love Them, was first exhibited in November of 1937, at the Chicago Art Institute’s “Sixth International Exhibition of Lithography and Wood Engraving”.

The contemporary print is a woodcut by Ellen Nathan Singer. Singer grew up in Brooklyn, New York and studied theater at Columbia University and at some of the New York acting schools. In her early twenties, she took classes at the Art Students League of New York where she won scholarships and ultimately taught. Recently, she was voted into the Society of American Graphic Artists, and is now on their council. Singer works primarily in pastels, etchings, and woodcuts. Trips around the country and abroad, almost yearly to England, serve as subject matter for her art. She also continues to work on New York City images, and to draw inspiration from the moment.

Image on Left: We Shall Always Love Them. By Arnold Ronnebeck. Lithograph, 1936. Edition 20.

Image on Right: On the High Wire.  [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010. Edition 10.

69561-1936

69438-2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***PER∙FORM opens THIS Friday, July 13, 2013, with an opening night reception. Join us at the gallery from 5:00 to 8:00pm to help us celebrate our new summer show!

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Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Linocut, Lithograph, Offset Lithograph, Prints, Woodcut

PER∙FORM to open in July

On the High Wire.  [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010.

On the High Wire. [New York, NY.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Woodcut, 2010.

PER∙FORM

We are very happy to announce our upcoming summer show, PER∙FORM, which opens on Friday, July 19, 2013. As always, there will be a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-8pm on that opening Friday. The show will stay up on the gallery walls until September 14, 2013.

PER∙FORM celebrates depictions of dancers, musicians, circus performers, and stars of the stage, and pulls from our inventory of both early 20th century and contemporary prints. Ranging from abstract to figurative, these compositions are ambitious and inventive in their attempt to capture sound, forms in movement, and the indefinable energy- both physical and emotional- that fuels and motivates performers.

Vibrato II. By Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006.

Vibrato II. By Stanley Kaplan. Color linocut, 2006.

Highlights include Stanley Kaplan’s Vibrato II, which uses multiple, repeated cuts into a linoleum matrix to mimic the quiver of its musical title and an original offset lithograph, circa 1938, that announces the arrival of Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey circus performers to 5th and Florida Avenue in Washington, DC. Another showstopper is Robert Riggs’ Drum Major. Completed in charcoal and red crayon, Riggs uses deft and simple line work to conjure up a musician who has given his whole body over to the performance- back arched and foot in mid stomp.

Untitled. [Drum Major]. By Robert Riggs. Charcoal & red crayon, c.1930.

Untitled. [Drum Major]. By Robert Riggs. Charcoal & red crayon, c.1930.

Several prints offer more intimate compositions- dancers hovering in the wings of a theater, a reserved and focused duo practicing for a recital. These serve as a nice contrast to scenes of rigorous athleticism and dramatic lighting mixing on center stage.  As such, this collection of prints not only showcases the spirit and emotive vitality of performers, but also draws attention to the diverse venues in which these performers execute their talent. Scenes are set under striped circus tents and red-curtained stages, as well as on subway platforms and city streets- proving that these printmakers were inspired by acts of performance both  practiced and spontaneous.

You said you had a Story?  (Sweet Smell of Success.). By Maya Hardin. Softground, 2002.

You said you had a Story? (Sweet Smell of Success.) By Maya Hardin. Softground, 2002.

Subway Dance. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color, finished by hand, 2007.

Subway Dance. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color, finished by hand, 2007.

Selected Artists: Abe Blashko, Central PTG and Illinois Co., Robert Cook, Joseph Essig, Eugene C. Fitsch, Thomas Handforth, Maya Hardin, Stanley Kaplan, Dorie Marder, Doel Reed, Robert Riggs, Arnold Ronnebeck, John Ross, Andree Ruellan, Georges Schreiber, Thomas Seawell, Ellen Nathan Singer, John Sloan, Sam Swerdloff, and Bruce Waldman.

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey. Published by Central PTG. and Illinois. Co., Chicago, U.S.A. Offset lithograph, c. 1938.

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey. Published by Central PTG. and Illinois. Co., Chicago, U.S.A. Offset lithograph, c. 1938.

PER∙FORM on the OPG Website: click here.

PER∙FORM Press Release: click here.

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