19th Century Prints, American Views, Chromolithograph, Collage, Contemporary, Landscapes, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Transfer print

Past/Present: Fall

Today is the first day of Fall, the autumnal equinox, “one of the two periods of the year when the sun crosses the equator and the days and nights are in equal length all over the earth” as explained by this article.  To celebrate this shift in seasons, we have a new Past/Present for you- two artists’ representations of autumn landscapes. The first is a 19th century depiction of the Starrucca Valley, located in Pennsylvania near Lanesboro. One of the few prints produced after a painting by Hudson River School artist Jasper Cropsey, this image was printed exclusively for members of the Crosby Opera House Art Association. We’ve paired it with a hand-colored transfer print and collage by contemporary printmaker Takayo Noda. We hope you enjoy these colorful celebrations of Fall!

Image on the top: American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. By Jasper Cropsey. Published by T. Sinclair’s Chromo Lith., Philadelphia. Lithographed by William Dresser. Chromolithograph, undated, c. 1870s. Image size 15 1/2 x 26 5/8″ (394 x 677 mm). LINK.

Image on the bottom : Autumn Day. By Takayo Noda. Transfer print, hand-colored, 2013. Three dimensional collage in areas. Signed, titled and inscribed “1/1.” Image size 6 7/8 x 9 5/8″ (175 x 243 mm). LINK.

American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. LINK.

American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. LINK.

Autumn Day. LINK.

Autumn Day. LINK.

 

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19th Century Prints, Chromolithograph, Lithograph, New Additions, Prints, Sporting

New Additions: Fishing Flies

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSMary Orvis Marbury’s “Favorite Flies and Their Histories”  became a best seller among anglers after it first appeared in 1892 and went through nine printings by 1896. The 32 prints in this unique book are done in stunning chromolithography, as achieved by M. Bradley Co. Lith.

Mary Orvis Marbury was daughter to Charles Orvis, founder of Orvis, the fishing, hunting, and sporting good store dynasty based in Manchester, Vermont. Mary ran the company’s fly fishing department and was inspired to write the book when she realized how little standardization there was among fly patterns. For each fly illustrated in the book, there is a description or story regarding the creation, design, or naming of the particular fly. In many cases, these descriptions are just as colorful and engaging as the illustrations. They were compiled by Maybury from conversations with regional anglers, letters amassed over time with far away fishermen, and from customers that frequented her family’s famous fishing shop.

One example, from “Bass Flies, Plate X” (pictured below):

“No.240. The Cleveland. There was once a jolly club of three, who styled themselves the “Texas Club,” saying that “their membership consisted of President, Secretary, and Treasurer.” The club was a fishing-club, and met summers to rejoice in being together and in fishing “galore.” The Secretary and Treasurer were rivals always; their joys would have been incomplete without the never-ceasing spirit of contest. What one had the other had, too, if money or skill could procure it, be it a big fish or a new hat. The Cheney fly was made and named in honor of the Secretary. A little later, the maker of the Cheney fly mas a fly with a gallina wing and red and black body, somewhat similar to Dr. Henshall’s Polka, and to it was given the title Cleveland after the Treasurer. But alas for human hopes! One day the maker of these flies met the Treasurer, and this conversation ensued:

Treasurer: I have wanted to meet you for a long time. I have a questions to ask you. Now, honestly, don’t you think you put just a little more color into the Cheney fly than you did the Cleveland? Now answer me frankly.

Maker: I did not intend to do so, I assure you.

Treasurer: Well, but I think you did. Couldn’t it be dressed up a trifle, some way?

Maker: I am glad you spoke to me about it. I shall be pleased to try again, and to make a fly more worthy of the name.

Treasurer: Yes, do; and mind you put a little more gilt on it than is on Cheney’s.

This new Cleveland fly is an earnest endeavor to construct a fly in the embodiment of strength, modesty, brilliancy, and other sterling merits, traits that win and hold the friends of Mr. William D. Cleveland outside as well as within the Texas Club.”

We hope you enjoy these new additions to our sporting and fishing section. As always, the prints can be viewed online as well as in our Georgetown DC gallery.

Bass Flies. Plate X. Cleveland, Cheney, Chippy, Dark Flaggon, Croppie, Barnwell.  From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate X. Cleveland, Cheney, Chippy, Dark Flaggon, Croppie, Barnwell. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate BB. Marston, Manchester, Horicon, Lake George, Max Von Dem Borne, Munro. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate BB. Marston, Manchester, Horicon, Lake George, Max Von Dem Borne, Munro. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate J. Oquossoc, Klamath, no name, New Lake, Tomah Jo., Prince Island. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate J. Oquossoc, Klamath, no name, New Lake, Tomah Jo., Prince Island. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate Z. Golden Dustman; Henshall; Knight Templar; Jungle Cock; Holberton; Holberton II. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Bass Flies. Plate Z. Golden Dustman; Henshall; Knight Templar; Jungle Cock; Holberton; Holberton II. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate K. Silver Doctor, H.P. Wells Pattern; Silver Doctor J. G. Shearer's Pattern; Silver Doctor, C. F. Orvis's Pattern; Spider; Seth Green; Silver Ibis. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16" (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate K. Silver Doctor, H.P. Wells Pattern; Silver Doctor J. G. Shearer’s Pattern; Silver Doctor, C. F. Orvis’s Pattern; Spider; Seth Green; Silver Ibis. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16″ (162 x 116 mm). LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate F. Green Weaver; Golden Pheasant; Gray Duke; Firey Brown; Grackle; Grasshopper. From "Favorite Flies and Their Histories," by Mary Orvis Marbury. "M. Bradley Co. Lith." Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16 inches. LINK.

Lake Flies. Plate F. Green Weaver; Golden Pheasant; Gray Duke; Firey Brown; Grackle; Grasshopper. From “Favorite Flies and Their Histories,” by Mary Orvis Marbury. “M. Bradley Co. Lith.” Text with print. Chromolithograph, 1892. Text with print. Image size 6 3/8 x 4 9/16 inches. LINK.

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18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, 2014 Holiday Gift Guide, 20th Century Maps, American Maps, Aquatint, Chromolithograph, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Copperplate, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Lithograph, Maps, Monotype, Multi-stone Lithograph, Natural History, Naval, Portraits, Prints, Serigraph, Sporting, Wood

2014 Holiday Gift Guide

We are less than a week until Christmas, and if you are like us, you are probably still searching for one or two last-minute gifts for that special someone (or someones!). We have you covered! We have always believed that art makes the BEST gifts. It is meaningful, special, and unlike the go-to Christmas sweater, always the right size. We have prints and maps for all interests, at all price points. Stop by our gallery or visit our website www.oldprintgallery.com to browse our collection of historic, antique, decorative, and fine original art. 

Below is a Holiday Gift Guide for 2014, with ideas for everyone on your list. We hope you enjoy our selections, and if you need more ideas, give us a call or stop by our gallery and we will be happy to help you find something fantastic. Happy shopping and Happy Holidays!

For the Cook:

Summer King Apple. Plate III. E. I. Schutt. Published by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Chromolithograph, 1912. Image size 6 1/4 x 3 3/8" (158 x 85 mm). LINK.  Lithographed by Julius Bien Co. Lith. From the USDA Yearbook. A beautiful chromolithograph of an apple, with a cross section of the apple below.

Summer King Apple. Plate III. E. I. Schutt. Published by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Chromolithograph, 1912. Image size 6 1/4 x 3 3/8″ (158 x 85 mm). LINK.
Lithographed by Julius Bien Co. Lith. From the USDA Yearbook. A beautiful chromolithograph of an apple, with a cross section of the apple below.

For the Sports Fan:

Lacrosse.  "Hard Pressed." T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, Aug 21, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8" (348 x 506 mm.). LINK.  Lacrosse, today a popular team sport in North America, may have developed as early as 1100 AD among indigenous peoples on the continent. By the seventeenth century, it was well-established. It was documented by Jesuit missionary priests in the territory of present-day Canada, although the game has undergone many modifications since that time.

Lacrosse. “Hard Pressed.” T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, Aug 21, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8″ (348 x 506 mm.). LINK.
Lacrosse, today a popular team sport in North America, may have developed as early as 1100 AD among indigenous peoples on the continent. By the seventeenth century, it was well-established. It was documented by Jesuit missionary priests in the territory of present-day Canada, although the game has undergone many modifications since that time.

For the Washingtonian:

Map of Washington, D.C.  George H. Walker. Published by the Walker Lith. & Pub. Co. Boston. Multi-stone lithograph, c.1900. Image size 21 1/2 x 26 1/4" plus margins. LINK.   A pleasant view of the city from the turn of the last century. Outlined in red are the many trolley lines that once ran in the city and suburbs. The Walker Co. was formed in 1880 by George Hiram Walker and his brother Oscar.  They were very prolific, publishing maps, atlases and bird's eye views of New England locales.  The Walkers were the last of Boston's important lithographers.  President George  Bush is a descendant of this family.

Map of Washington, D.C. George H. Walker. Published by the Walker Lith. & Pub. Co. Boston. Multi-stone lithograph, c.1900. Image size 21 1/2 x 26 1/4″ plus margins. LINK.
A pleasant view of the city from the turn of the last century. Outlined in red are the many trolley lines that once ran in the city and suburbs. The Walker Co. was formed in 1880 by George Hiram Walker and his brother Oscar. They were very prolific, publishing maps, atlases, and bird’s eye views of New England and East Coast locales. The Walkers were the last of Boston’s important lithographers. President George Bush is a descendant of this family.

For the World Traveler:

Encampment of the Travellers. By Karl Bodmer. Published by Ackermann & Co., London. Aquatint engraving, 1843-44. Image size 7 1/2 x 11" (190 x 290 mm) plus title and margins. From "Travels in the Interior of North America"  by Maximilian, Prince of Wied-Neuwied.  In 1832, the German prince, Maximilian of Wied, organized an expedition to explore the region along the Missouri River.  He was accompanied by Karl Bodmer, a young Swiss artist, who recorded in pictorial form all he observed.  Following the Lewis & Clark trail up the Missouri River, they traveled 5,000 miles during the course of a year.  Maximilian kept detailed notes on a day-by-day basis for his book, which was published six years later in German, French, and English editions and included Bodmer's aquatint engravings.  Karl Bodmer's landscapes, portraits, and splendid scenes of Indian life are regarded today as first rate picture histories of the western frontier at that time. Engraved by Outhwaite.  Printed by de Bougeard. LINK.

Encampment of the Travellers. By Karl Bodmer. Published by Ackermann & Co., London. Aquatint engraving, 1843-44. Image size 7 1/2 x 11″ (190 x 290 mm) plus title and margins. LINK.
From “Travels in the Interior of North America” by Maximilian, Prince of Wied-Neuwied. In 1832, the German prince, Maximilian of Wied, organized an expedition to explore the region along the Missouri River. He was accompanied by Karl Bodmer, a young Swiss artist, who recorded in pictorial form all he observed. Following the Lewis & Clark trail up the Missouri River, they traveled 5,000 miles during the course of a year. Maximilian kept detailed notes on a day-by-day basis for his book, which was published six years later in German, French, and English editions and included Bodmer’s aquatint engravings. Karl Bodmer’s landscapes, portraits, and splendid scenes of Indian life are regarded today as first rate picture histories of the western frontier at that time. Engraved by Outhwaite. Printed by de Bougeard.

For the History-Buff:

John Paul Jones. C. J. Notte. Published by  Carl Guttenberg, Paris. Engraving, 1780. Image size 10 11/16 x 9 1/16”, plus publication line and margins. LINK.  Title continues: "Commodore au Service des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique...". Engraved by Carl Guttenberg. John Paul Jones( 1747-1792) was an American naval officer, famous for his exploits in British waters during the American Revolution. As captain of the Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones fought an epic battle against Captain Pearson’s ship Serapis. It is during this battle that he uttered his famous words "I have not yet begun to fight". The engraving shows Jones on the deck of ship, dramatically emerging from smoke and musket fire. Although the engraver, Carl Guttenberg, was from Nuremberg, he lived in France and like many French at the time, was deeply connected to the American cause. The French admired Jones for his heroism and celebrated his success, making this print popular not only in America, but France as well.

John Paul Jones. C. J. Notte. Published by Carl Guttenberg, Paris. Engraving, 1780. Image size 10 11/16 x 9 1/16”, plus publication line and margins. LINK.
Title continues: “Commodore au Service des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique…”. Engraved by Carl Guttenberg. John Paul Jones (1747-1792) was an American naval officer, famous for his exploits in British waters during the American Revolution. As captain of the Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones fought an epic battle against Captain Pearson’s ship Serapis. It is during this battle that he uttered his famous words “I have not yet begun to fight”. The engraving shows Jones on the deck of ship, dramatically emerging from smoke and musket fire. Although the engraver, Carl Guttenberg, was from Nuremberg, he lived in France and like many French at the time, was deeply connected to the American cause. The French admired Jones for his heroism and celebrated his success, making this print popular not only in America, but in France as well.

For the Nature-Lover:

a. Cardamomum munis Cardamoe. b. Cardamonum longum vel medium. N. 306. (Cardamom). Johann W. Weinmann. Published Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-45. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8 inches. LINK. From Johann Wilhelm Weinmann's Phytanthoza Iconographia. This beautiful work provides a nearly complete record of the flowers, fruits and vegetables cultivated in the early 18th century. The plates are among the earliest examples of color printing from a single plate.

a. Cardamomum munis Cardamoe. b. Cardamonum longum vel medium. N. 306. (Cardamom). Johann W. Weinmann. Published Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-45. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8 inches. LINK.
From Johann Wilhelm Weinmann’s “Phytanthoza Iconographia.” This beautiful work provides a nearly complete record of the flowers, fruits and vegetables cultivated in the early 18th century. The plates are among the earliest examples of color printing from a single plate.

For the Map Enthusiast:

A Map of the Most Inhabited part of Virginia containing the whole Province of Maryland with Part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina. Drawn by Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson in 1775. Printed for Robt. Sayer at No. 53 in Fleet Street. Copper plate engraving, c.1777. Four-sheet map, joined into two sheets. Overall, if joined, 31 x 48 1/4. LINK.   This important map of Virginia was commissioned by the English Lords of Trade, who in 1750 required each colony to conduct a comprehensive survey. Joshua Fry, a mathematician, and Peter Jefferson, a surveyor and father of Thomas Jefferson, were appointed to execute the commission. The resulting map is highly detailed, giving roads, ferry crossings, settlements and names of many of the rivers and creeks. It is also the first map to depict the general configuration of the Appalachian and Allegheny mountain ranges. The cartouche depicts an image of the Virginia tobacco trade. The map was first issued in 1751. Other editions were done in 1755 onward through 1794. This particular map is from the 1775 edition and likely appeared in Thomas Jefferys' "The American Atlas."

A Map of the Most Inhabited part of Virginia containing the whole Province of Maryland with Part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina. Drawn by Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson in 1775. Printed for Robt. Sayer at No. 53 in Fleet Street. Copper plate engraving, c.1777. Four-sheet map, joined into two sheets. Overall, if joined, 31 x 48 1/4. LINK.
This important map of Virginia was commissioned by the English Lords of Trade, who in 1750 required each colony to conduct a comprehensive survey. Joshua Fry, a mathematician, and Peter Jefferson, a surveyor and father of Thomas Jefferson, were appointed to execute the commission. The resulting map is highly detailed, giving roads, ferry crossings, settlements and names of many of the rivers and creeks. It is also the first map to depict the general configuration of the Appalachian and Allegheny mountain ranges. The cartouche depicts an image of the Virginia tobacco trade. The map was first issued in 1751. Other editions were done in 1755 onward through 1794. This particular map is from the 1775 edition and likely appeared in Thomas Jefferys’ “The American Atlas.”

For the Kids:

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew.  Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2 inches. LINK.  Edition of 55. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. A fanciful image of a boat, castle, and friendly creatures. printed in beautiful colors.

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2 inches. LINK.
Edition of 55. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. A fanciful image of a boat, castle, and friendly creatures. Printed in three beautiful colors.

For the City-Slicker:

Gotham Lights. Michael Di Cerbo. Etching, aquatint, and drypoint, 2005. Image size 11 7/8 x 8 13/16 inches. LINK.  Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil by artist. Micahel DiCerbo is a NEw York City based artist. Di Cerbo has turned his sense of urban grandeur into geometric forms with patterns of light and dark that allude to the soaring architecture of skyscrapers. One sees the city from the perspective of both an ant and eagle, moving endlessly upward or falling away to infinite chasms below. The images, though devoid of people and any overt sign of life, create an ambiance of mystery. One may find themselves alone in a composition as an observer of a timeless cityscape.

Gotham Lights. Michael Di Cerbo. Etching, aquatint, and drypoint, 2005. Image size 11 7/8 x 8 13/16 inches. LINK.
Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil by artist. Micahel DiCerbo is a NEw York City based artist. Di Cerbo has turned his sense of urban grandeur into geometric forms with patterns of light and dark that allude to the soaring architecture of skyscrapers. One sees the city from the perspective of both an ant and eagle, moving endlessly upward or falling away to infinite chasms below. The images, though devoid of people and any overt sign of life, create an ambiance of mystery. One may find themselves alone in a composition as an observer of a timeless citiscape.

For the Contemporary:

Dreamscape #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2010. Image size 13 3/4 x 9 7/8 inches. LINK. Signed and titled in pencil by the artist. Ed 1/1. Bennet’s medium of choice is the monotype, abstract and dynamic images achieved as a result of his playful and liberal approach to printmaking. He experiments with colored inks of varied viscosity, often employing hued “ghost” images as backgrounds for new prints and integrating multiple plates into each composition. His unrestricted and unique working style allows for a spontaneity and creative freedom not normally associated with printmaking.

Dreamscape #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2010. Image size 13 3/4 x 9 7/8 inches. LINK.
Signed and titled in pencil by the artist. Ed 1/1. Bennet’s medium of choice is the monotype, abstract and dynamic images achieved as a result of his playful and liberal approach to printmaking. He experiments with colored inks of varied viscosity, often employing hued “ghost” images as backgrounds for new prints and integrating multiple plates into each composition. His unrestricted and unique working style allows for a spontaneity and creative freedom not normally associated with printmaking.

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Chromolithograph, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Natural History, Prints, Science

The World’s Minerals

Today we are sharing several chromolithographic plates from Leonard J. Spencer’s The World’s Minerals. Published in London by W. & R. Chambers, this 1911 book included forty colored plates, twenty-one diagrams, and descriptive text for “116 species of the more common simple minerals.” The introductory chapter of the book explains that The Worlds Minerals is an attempt to “present in popular language an interesting and readable account of several kinds of minerals.” For each mineral, Spencer describes the defining physical characteristics and mineralogical make-up, and highlights any practical applications for use in the modern world. Spencer worked for the Mineral Department of The British Museum, and was editor of The Mineralogical Magazine.

We currently have eight plates available for sale, all of which can be viewed online or in our Georgetown DC gallery. Hope you enjoy!

Oxides (Quartz group). Plate 12.  1. Agate. 2,3. Jasper. 4. Hornstone. From "The World's Minerals" by J. Spencer. LINK.

Oxides (Quartz group). Plate 12. 1. Agate. 2, 3. Jasper. 4. Hornstone. From “The World’s Minerals” by Leonard J. Spencer. LINK.

Silicates. Plate 28. 1. Sodalite. 2. Lapis-lazuli. 3. Leucite. 4. Beryl. From "The World's Minerals" by J. Spencer. LINK.

Silicates. Plate 28. 1. Sodalite. 2. Lapis-lazuli. 3. Leucite. 4. Beryl. From “The World’s Minerals” by Leonard J. Spencer. LINK.

Haloids : Oxides. Plate 10. 1,2, Rock-salt. 3, Atacamite. 4,5, Opal. From "The World's Minerals" by J. Spencer. LINK.

Haloids: Oxides. Plate 10. 1, 2. Rock-salt. 3. Atacamite. 4, 5. Opal. From “The World’s Minerals” by Leonard J. Spencer. LINK.

Sulphides & Arsenides. Plate 6. 1. Niccolite. 2. & 3. Cinnabar. 4. Mispickel. From "The World's Minerals" by J. Spencer. LINK.

Sulphides & Arsenides. Plate 6. 1. Niccolite. 2, 3. Cinnabar. 4. Mispickel. From “The World’s Minerals” by Leonard J. Spencer. LINK.

Sulphur-Salts. Plate 8. 1, Platinum. 2-4, Gold. 5,6, Copper. From "The World's Minerals" by J. Spencer. LINK.

Sulphur-Salts. Plate 8.  1, 2. Copper-pyrites. 3. Smaltite. 4. Tetrahedrite. 5. Pyrargyrite. 6. Proustite. From “The World’s Minerals” by Leonard J. Spencer. LINK.

Metallic Elements. Plate 3. 1. Platinum. 2-4. Gold. 5-6. Copper. From "The World's Minerals" by J. Spencer. LINK.

Metallic Elements. Plate 3. 1. Platinum. 2-4. Gold. 5, 6. Copper. From “The World’s Minerals” by Leonard J. Spencer. LINK.

Carbonates. Plate 19.  1-2. Chessylite. 3-4. Malachite. From "The World's Minerals" by J. Spencer. LINK.

Carbonates. Plate 19. 1, 2. Chessylite. 3, 4. Malachite. From “The World’s Minerals” by Leonard J. Spencer. LINK.

Sulphates. Plate 20. 1-2. Barytes. 3. Anglesite. 4. Celestite. From "The World's Minerals" by J. Spencer. LINK.

Sulphates. Plate 20. 1, 2. Barytes. 3. Anglesite. 4. Celestite. From “The World’s Minerals” by Leonard J. Spencer. LINK.

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19th Century Prints, Botanical, Chromolithograph, Lithograph, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Fern Prints

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSBetween 1837 and 1914, Pteridomania, or fern madness, swept through Britain and, later, the United States. Coupled with the rise of the amateur gardener and naturalist in the nineteenth century, hundreds of books and articles encouraged a popular fascination with ferns. This resulted in widespread collection and cultivation of the plant.

Ferns are one of the oldest forms of life still thriving; fern fossils have been found dating back 360 million years, although the majority of most modern species only date back to the Cretaceous period (145 million years ago). To the Victorian populace, ferns encapsulated the mystery and majesty of another era. Lectures were given on fern history and the differences in both form and color of the  multitude of obtainable varieties for cultivation. These talks were often concluded with expert-led “fern-hunting” parties, comprised of a group of pteridomaniacs trouncing through English hills and lanes, searching for particularly rare or beautiful fern specimens.

As the craze intensified, fern patterns and motifs appeared on fabric, embroidery, cast iron, and pottery. Women wore gowns decorated with ferns, exchanged pressed ferns, and collected illustrations of ferns torn from the pages of scientific volumes. The Wardian case was invented in 1829 by a physician to protect his ferns from the air pollution of London, and soon became a staple in stylish households, along with outdoor ferneries.

Fern mania reached American shores as well, although with a little less intensity. Turn of the century greenhouse ferneries were established in Philadelphia, Detroit, and Chicago, and other cities.

From E.J. Lowe’s Our Native Ferns; or a History of the British Species and Their Varieties. Chromolithographs, published by Groombridge and Sons, London, 1865-67. See all available E. J. Lowe fern prints here.

Plate LIX. Bleachnum Spicant (Var. Subserratum) and B. Spicant (Var. Ramosum). LINK.

Plate LIX. Bleachnum Spicant (Var. Subserratum) and B. Spicant (Var. Ramosum). LINK.

Plate LII. Scolopendrium Vulgare (Var. Submarginatum). S. Vulgare (Var. Jugosum) . LINK.

Plate LII. Scolopendrium Vulgare (Var. Submarginatum) and S. Vulgare (Var. Jugosum). LINK.

Plate LXXVI. Botrychium Lunaria and B. Lunaria (Var. Moorei). LINK.

Plate LXXVI. Botrychium Lunaria and B. Lunaria (Var. Moorei). LINK.

From Anne Pratt’s The Flowering Plants, Sedges and Ferns of Great Britain. Chromolithographs, published by Frederick Warne & Co., London, c. 1865-75. Engraved by W. Dickes. See all Anne Pratt fern prints here. 

1. Mountain Bladder Fern. (Cystopteris montana) 2. Alpine B. F. (C. alpina). LINK.

1. Mountain Bladder Fern. (Cystopteris montana) 2. Alpine B. F. (C. alpina). LINK.

Common Brake. LINK.

Common Brake. LINK.

From Daniel Cady Eaton’s Ferns of the United States of America. Chromolithographs published by Armstrong & Co. Lith., Boston, 1879. After watercolors by C. E. Faxon and J. H. Emerton. Eaton was a Yale botany professor who founded the Peabody Museum Herbarium. See all our Eaton fern prints here.

Eaton Fern Plate III. Asplenium Serratum fern. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate III. Asplenium Serratum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LII. A Woodwardia Virginica fern. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LII. Woodwardia Virginica. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXVII. Aspidium Floridanum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXVII. Aspidium Floridanum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXII. Aspidium Aculeatum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXII. Aspidium Aculeatum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXXI. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXXI. Woodsia Oregana. Woodsia Scopulina. Woodsia Obtusa. LINK.

 

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