19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Roto-engraving

New Additions: Cram’s 1898 City Plans

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added twenty-four city plans from a 1898 version of “Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” to our map inventory. George F. Cram Co. was a leading 19th and 20th century map firm, based out of Chicago and later Indianapolis. It was the first American firm to publish a world atlas, and brought globes, classroom maps, and educational atlases into the schools and homes of many. His “Unrivaled Atlas of the World” was so popular it was printed continuously from the 1880’s to 1952.

These maps shown today were printed using color rotogravure, an intaglio technique adopted in the late 19th century. For those looking to collect a map of their city or a favorite travel destination, these Cram maps are handsome and finely detailed. Many offer a key to prominent buildings, churches, attractions, and railroad depots within the city. They are attractively colored in blues, yellows, and pinks, and well sized at ~10 x 13 inches. We hope you enjoy these maps!

“Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” Maps Available at The Old Print Gallery:

  1. Baltimore.
  2. Buffalo.
  3. Brooklyn.
  4. Boston.
  5. Yellowstone National Park.
  6. Map of Parkersburg West Virginia, and Vicinity. 
  7. Richmond and Manchester, Virginia.
  8. Map of Cincinnati.
  9. Cleveland.
  10. Detroit.
  11. Map of the City of Saginaw, Michigan.
  12. Map of Chicago.
  13. St. Louis.
  14. Council Bluffs.
  15. Map of St. Paul.
  16. Omaha.
  17. Denver.
  18. Louisville.
  19. Nashville.
  20. Atlanta.
  21. New Orleans.
  22. Map of the City of Quebec.
  23. Dallas.
  24. City of Montreal.
Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2". LINK.

Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2″.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8", plus text and margins.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8″, plus text and margins.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12". LINK.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12″.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8  x 10". LINK.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8 x 10″.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2". LINK.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2″.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13  x 10 1/8". LINK.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 x 10 1/8″.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

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Abstract, Citiscapes, Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Landscapes, Lithograph, Multi-stone Lithograph, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Richard Florsheim Lithographs

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSIn preparation for our upcoming landscape show, Resonant Terrain, we have added several lithographs by Richard Florsheim, one of the artists selected for the exhibit, to our 20th century print inventory. With titles like “City Lights”, “Illuminations”, and “Light and Water”, it is apparent the Florsheim was engrossed with and inspired by his surroundings, allowing both the sea and the city to have equal reign over his creative focus. Using large, gestural sweeps of the lithographic pencil over stone and dynamic swathes of color, Florsheim was able to capture the vibrancy of his hometowns of Chicago and Provincetown.

Night Harbor. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1962. Image size 13 15/16 x 17 7/8" (353 x 454 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Night Harbor. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1962. Image size 13 15/16 x 17 7/8″ (353 x 454 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Richard Florsheim was active as a painter, sculptor and graphics artist in Chicago, Milwaukee, Provincetown, and Woodstock, New York. Florsheim was born in Chicago in 1916. He spent his youth and early adulthood studying at the University of Chicago and in New York with artist Aaron Bohrod. His father paid for a lengthy European independent study, where Florsheim exhibited at Salon des Refusés, and the Musée du Jeu de Paume honored him by purchasing one of his paintings, Don Quixote.

Florsheim returned to Chicago in 1939, and began lithography in 1940, exhibiting at the Quest Gallery and working out of a studio on North Avenue. He then enlisted in the US Navy, active in the Pacific Theater as a cartographer. It was at this time that he also obtained patents for his radar plane-spotting technique.

After the war, he resumed his artistic career, exhibiting widely. He helped found the Artists’ League of the Midwest with Artists’ Equity Association of New York. He was assistant director of the Arts Center Association, 1951-52, and taught at the Layton School of Art in Milwaukee from 1949 to 1950, and the Contemporary Art Workshop in Chicago from 1952 to 1963. From 1965 to 1973, he was a board member of the Illinois Arts Council.  Florsheim was a member of the National Academy of Design, the Society of American Graphic Artists, the Provincetown Art Association, which he served as Trustee and Vice President from 1962 to 1971, and the Chicago Society of Artists.

Light and Water.  Richard Florsheim. Lithograph , 1959.  Image size 17 3/4 x 13 7/8" (450 x 353 mm).  Edition 30. LINK.

Light and Water. Richard Florsheim. Lithograph , 1959. Image size 17 3/4 x 13 7/8″ (450 x 353 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Illuminations.  Richard Florsheim. Lithograph, 1959. Commissioned by the Print & Drawing Club of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Image size 17 13/16 x 13 7/8" (452 x 352 mm). Edition 180. LINK.

Illuminations. Richard Florsheim. Lithograph, 1959. Commissioned by the Print & Drawing Club of the Art Institute of Chicago. Image size 17 13/16 x 13 7/8″ (452 x 352 mm). Edition 180. LINK.

Last Light. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1962. Image size 13 15/16 x 17 7/8" (353 x 454 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Last Light. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1962. Image size 13 15/16 x 17 7/8″ (353 x 454 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Dark City. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph,  1967. Image size 20 11/16 x 22 1/2" (409 x 571 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Dark City. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1967. Image size 20 11/16 x 22 1/2″ (409 x 571 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

City Lights. Richard Florsheim. Published by Associated American Artists.  Color lithograph, 1965. Image size 10 1/16 x 29 13/16" (255 x 758 mm). Edition 250 + 33 a.p. LINK.

City Lights. Richard Florsheim. Published by Associated American Artists. Color lithograph, 1965. Image size 10 1/16 x 29 13/16″ (255 x 758 mm). Edition 250 + 33 a.p. LINK.

City Morning. (City Halo). Richard Florsheim. Published by Associated American Artists. Color lithograph, 1964. Image size 10 1/4 x 29 1/2" (259 x 749 mm). Edition 250.  LINK.

City Morning. (City Halo). Richard Florsheim. Published by Associated American Artists. Color lithograph, 1964. Image size 10 1/4 x 29 1/2″ (259 x 749 mm). Edition 250. LINK.

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American Views, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Rain

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two rainy day prints by Martin Lewis and Richard Florsheim. Martin Lewis was born on June 7, 1881 in Castlemaine, Australia. He was the second of eight children and he had a passion for drawing. At the age of fifteen he left home and traveled in New South Wales and New Zealand, working as a post hole digger and a merchant seaman before settling into a Bohemian community outside of Sidney. Two of his drawings were published in a radical Sydney newspaper, the Bulletin. He also studied with Julian Ashton at the Art Society’s School in Sydney. Ashton, a famous painter, was also one the first Australian artists to take up printmaking.

In 1900, Lewis left for the United States. His first known job after arriving in the United States was painting stage decorations for the McKinley Presidential Campaign of 1900. Little is known of his early years in this country; however, by 1909 he was living and working in New York City. With the exception of a few years, he spent the rest of his life in and around the city. His earliest etching dates from 1915 but shows a technical ability that suggests that he had been working in the medium for some time. During these early years, Lewis experimented with different intaglio processes including etching, aquatint, engraving, mezzotint, and drypoint.

In 1920, Lewis left for Japan, a turning point in his artistic career. He studied the art and culture of Japan. During his eighteen-month stay, he spent his time painting in both oil and watercolor. He did not work in printmaking again until 1925, when he produced a group of etchings and drypoints depicting Japan. These new prints led him several years later to produce many memorable images of New York City. The period of 1925 through 1935 was his most productive, during which he produced eighty-one of his one hundred and forty-eight known prints.

Richard Florsheim was active as a painter, sculptor and graphics artist in Chicago, Milwaukee, Provincetown, and Woodstock, New York. Florsheim was born in Chicago in 1916, to a very wealthy family. He spent his youth and early adulthood studying at the University of Chicago and in New York with artist Aaron Bohrod. His father paid for a lengthy European independent study, where Florsheim exhibited at Salon des Refusés, and the Musée du Jeu de Paume honored him by purchasing one of his paintings, Don Quixote.

Florsheim returned to Chicago in 1939, and began lithography in 1940, exhibiting at the Quest Gallery and working out of a studio on North Avenue. He then enlisted in the US Navy, active in the Pacific Theater as a cartographer. It was at this time that he also obtained patents for his radar plane-spotting technique.

After the war, he resumed his artistic career, exhibiting widely. He helped found the Artists’ League of the Midwest with Artists’ Equity Association of New York. He was assistant director of the Arts Center Association, 1951-52, and taught at the Layton School of Art in Milwaukee from 1949 to 1950, and the Contemporary Art Workshop in Chicago from 1952 to 1963. From 1965 to 1973, he was a board member of the Illinois Arts Council.  Florsheim was a member of the National Academy of Design, the Society of American Graphic Artists, the Provincetown Art Association, which he served as Trustee and Vice President from 1962 to 1971, and the Chicago Society of Artists.

Image on Right: Rain on Murray Hill.  By Martin Lewis. Drypoint, 1928. Recorded impressions 100.

Image on Left: City Rain. By Richard Florsheim. Published by The Associated American Artists. Lithograph, 1976. Edition of 250.

875

36793

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